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Publication numberUS3829597 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1974
Filing dateApr 26, 1973
Priority dateApr 26, 1973
Also published asCA990553A, CA990553A1, DE2420159A1
Publication numberUS 3829597 A, US 3829597A, US-A-3829597, US3829597 A, US3829597A
InventorsR Peterson, R Finch
Original AssigneeR Peterson, R Finch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Keyboard instrument player system with time division multiplexing techniques and synchronized rhythm device
US 3829597 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent n91 Peterson et a1.

[451 Aug. 13, 1974 KEYBOARD INSTRUMENT PLAYER SYSTEM WITH TIME DIVISION MULTIPLEXING TECHNIQUES AND SYNCHRONIZED RHYTHM DEVICE [76] Inventors: Richard H. Peterson, 11748 Walnut Ridge Drive 60464; Robert A. Finch, 12219 South 89th Avenue, both of Palos Park, Ill.

[51] Int. Cl. GlOh 1/00 [58] Field of Search 84/1.02, 1.03, 1.28, DIG. 29,

84/l.01, 461, 462, DIG. 12

3,697,661 10/1972 Dcutsch 84/101 3,781,452 12/1973 3,789,719 2/1974 Maillct 84/103 X Primary ExaminerRichard B. Wilkinson Assistant Eraminer-Stanley J. Witkowski Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Jones and Lockwood 5 7 ABSTRACT A player type electrically operated musical instrument includes a rhythm device for producing timed repetitive rhythm patterns of unpitched or semi-pitched percussive sounds. Information as to the playing of the keys of the instrument is encoded in digital form on one track of a magnetic tape using time division multiplexing techniques. The sounds produced by the rhythm device are simultaneously recorded on a second audio channel on the same magnetic tape. On

[56] Referenc Cited playback, the digital channel is decoded and used to UNITED STATES PATENTS play the same or a similar musical instrument, and

the audio channel is reproduced to provide a rhythm 2,533,461 12/1950 lllsley 84/1.28 3 250 847 5/l960 Chamberlain 84H 28 accompaniment synchronized to the performance of 3 272 907 9/1966 Chamberlainiiiiiii 11:11:: 84/1I28 the instrument Information encoded the digital 3:546:354 12/1970 uchiyama h I i 0 34/102 track automatically disconnects the rhythm instrument 3,562,398 2/1971 Bnj2lm1rl....' 1 84/1.03 during p ay ack and connects the audio channel of 3,604,299 9/1971 Englund 84/1.03 the tape player to the reproducing system. 3,610,799 /1971 Watson 84/1.01 3,647,929 3/1972 Milde, .lr 84/1.01 11 C aims, 2 Drawing Figures 3,683,096 8/1972 Peterson et a1. 84/1.03 X

I08 ,-l|5 AUTOMATIC AUDIO MAGNETIC RHYTHM 3| TAPE TRACK DE DIGITAL MAGNETIC I22 I TAPE TRACK ORGAN 010mm. KEYSWITCHES '4' I19 I18 LOUDSPEAKER DIGITAL 2 KEYING DECODER AND SWITCHES ittl 125, ORGAN TONE GENERATING SYSTEM LOUDSPEAKER PATENTEU 31974 3.829.597

H5 H9 I08 H8 '05 H3 H H6 H2 IoI Io2 w IOO"\ -I52 Figure 1 [I08 I ,II5 AuToMATIc AuDIo MAGNETIc RHYTHM m TAPE TRACK DEVICE DIGITAL MAGNETIC TAPE TRAcI l22 I ORGAN DIGITAL KEYSWITCHES KEYING ENCODER H9 H8 DIGITAL KEYING DECODER l AND SWITCHES 5 '26 I27 T ORGAN ToNE GENERATING AMPLIFIER LOUDSPEAKER SYSTEM Figure 2 l KEYBOARD INSTRUMENT PLAYER SYSTEM WITH TIME DIVISION MULTIPLEXING TECHNIQUES AND SYNCHRONIZED RHYTHM DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to the subject matter disclosed in prior U.S. Pat. No. 3,683,096 dated Aug. 8, 1972, and titled Electronic Player System for Electrically Operated Musical Instrument. More specifically, the present invention is directed to the problem of maintaining synchronism between the playing of a musical instrument by an automatic player device and the sounds produced by an automatic rhythm device, which may have been used during the original performance, to produce patterns of unpitched or semi-pitched musical sounds. Such rhythm devices are well known and are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,105,106; 3,146,290; 3,247,307; 3,255,292 (Re, 26,521 3,358,068; 3,383,542; and 3,478,633.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Our prior U.S. Pat. No. 3,683,096 discloses a Player System for Electrically Operated Musical Instruments. In the system disclosed, information representing the manipulation of the playing keys of a musical instrument, such as an organ, is converted to electrical signals and recorded digitally on magnetic tape using a conventional cassette recorder. A system known as time division multiplexing is used to encode the keying" information on the magnetic tape. n playback the recorded signal is decoded" and used to operate a series of semiconductor switches" to play a similar or the same musical instrument.

Many keyboard instruments now include an automatic rhythm playing device, one type of which is sold commercially under the name Select-A-Rhythm, and marketed by Gulbransen Industries of Chicago, Illinois. The incorporation of such a rhythm device complicates the operation of the player instrument in that it is not economically practical to use the digital system to operate the automatic rhythm instrument. In the present invention two types of magnetic recording, on two separate tracks, are utilitized. One track is used for encoding, digitally, information for keying the instrument, and for controlling the second audio track, upon which the sounds of the automatic rhythm instrument are linearly" recorded.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an electronic organ with a rhythm device.

FIG. 2 is a combination block, schematic drawing of a player system'according to the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT combination of desired rhythm patterns such as, ballad, rock, tango, waltz, and so on. The tempo control 112 adjusts the tempo of the rhythm pattern, and the start stop control 1 13 starts and stops the production of the rhythm sounds. In ordinary use, the performer, having preset the tempo control to a suitable tempo for the music to be played, turns on the rhythm unit by pushing the on button 113, and then proceeds to play the keys and pedals of the instrument in time with the automatically produced rhythm pattern. With some rhythm devices the tempo can be controlled to a considerable degree by an automatic mechanism which senses the rate of pedal key depression and adjusts the tempo automatically. For example if he wants to speed-up his rhythm he may do so by gradually speeding up his playing, and the rhythm device will automatically sense the speed-up and speed-up the tempo accordingly. 115 is a magnetic tape recorder having at least two separate magnetic tracks. The controls 116 are conventional and serve to turn the tape recording device on and off and to perform the usual rewind and fast forward functions.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the automatic rhythm device 108 is connected to the audio input terminal 120 of the tape recorder 115. Whenever one of the buttons 110 of FIG. 1 is depressed, an automatic rhythm pattern is produced by the automatic rhythm device 108 and the audio signals produced by the rhythm device will be applied to the input of amplifier 132 by way of relay contacts 133 and 134, and will be heard through the loudspeaker 152. In addition, the signals from the rhythm device 108 are connected to the input terminal 120 of the tape recorder 115, and will be recorded in linear form on the audio track, providing the the record" button 118 is depressed.

' Conventional organ keyswitches 122 are understood to be physically connected to be operated by the keys .101, 102, and the pedals 103 (FIG. 1) and are connected to a conventional organ tone generating system 125. The particular tone generating system employed is not a part of the present invention, it being understood that any of the many known systems would be appropriate. The output of the tone generating system is connected to the amplifier 126, and. thence to loudspeaker 127, which reproduces the sound of the organ portion of the instrument. Also connected to the organ keyswitches is the digital keying encoder which is preferably of the type shown in FIG. 1 of our prior U.S. Pat. No. 3,683,096, previously referred to. The output of the digital keying encoder is connected to the input terminal 131 of the digital track of the magnetic recorder 115, and again assuming the record button 118 is depressed, information as to the instantaneous open or closed condition of the organ keyswitches will be recorded in the form of digital data on the digital magnetic tape track. Also connected to the digital keying encoder 130 is the rhythm on/off switch 114 which is also connected to the source of potential 128. The rhythm on/off switch 144 is physically attached to and is operated by, the on/off knob 113 in FIG. 1. Whenever switch 113 is closed and the rhythm device is operating this information is digitally encoded on the digital track.

To recreate the complete musical performance, the magnetic tape is rewound, and the play button 119 (FIG. 1) is depressed, which puts the magnetic tape recorder in its playback mode. Under these conditions,

3 the output of the digital magnetic track will appear at terminal 140 and will be connected to the input of the digital keying decoder terminal 141. The decoder also includes a series of semiconductor switches which are operated by the decoder. The operation of this decode system is explained in connection with FIG. 7 of the prior US. Pat. No. 3,683,096 previously referred to. The electronic switches which are a part of the decoder are connected in parallel with the organ keyswitches by means of cable 144. In this manner The original organ performance is duplicated and once again the sound of the original performance is heard through loudspeaker 127.

In addition, because the condition (open or closed) of switch 113 was digitally encoded an output voltage will now appear at decoder output terminal 145 for such periods of time during the original performance when switch 113 was closed. Whenever such a voltage is present, relay 147 is energized, thus pulling switchblade 134 away from contact 133 and into contact with terminal 149 as indicated in FIG. 2 by the dotted line position of the contact 134. Terminal 149 is connected to the output of the audio track of the magnetic tape recorder, and thus the audio signals that were recorded during the original performance will be connected to the amplifier 132 and will be reproduced by loudspeaker 152. Thus the complete performance, including rhythm and organ, will be reproduced, and with the original rhythm accompaniment heard in perfect synchronism with the player performance of the organ.

waltz rhythm would be appropriate and it would be very undesirable if the automatic rhythm device was to produce a tango or a bossa nova accompaniment during playback while the organ was recreating a waltz melody. This problem is solved by the apparatus of the invention. because if a rhythm effect was used during encoding of the organ performance, upon playback the automatic rhythm device is automatically locked out and only the recorded rhythm sound is heard.

Others may readily adapt the invention to various uses by employing one or more of the novel elements disclosed. As at present advised, we desire to claim the following subject matter:

We claim:

1. A keyboard instrument player system for recording and later recreating a musical performance, comprising: y

an electrically operated musical instrument having a plurality of playing key-operated keyswitches;

an electrically operated tone generating system connected to and responsive to said keyswitches to produce pitched musical tones; a rhythm device for producing selected rhythm sound patterns; a

a tape recorder having first and second magnetic tracks, and means for operating said recorder in a record mode;

a time division multiplex encoder connected to said keyswitches to encode information as to the on or off condition of said keyswitches;

means feeding said encoded information to said tape recorder to record said information in digital'form v on said first magnetic track when said tape recorder is in its record mode; and

means feeding said rhythm sound patterns to said tape recorder to record said patterns on said second magnetic track when said tape recorder is in its record mode.

2. The player system of claim 1, further including:

means providing a playback mode for said tape recorder;

a keying decoder having a plurality of electrical switches corresponding to said keyswitches; means connecting said keying decoder between the output of said first track of said tape recorder and said tone generating system during said playback mode, said keying decoder receiving said information in digital form and operating said electrical switches in accordance therewith, said tone generating system responding to said electrical switches to produce pitched musical tones; and

means for reproducing said rhythm sound patterns recorded on said second track of said tape recorder during said playback mode.

3. The player system of claim 2, further including an amplifier and a loudspeaker connected to the output thereof and means connecting said rhythm device to the input of said amplifier to produce sound patterns; said means for reproducing said recorder rhythm sound patterns including means for selectively disconnecting said rhythm device from said amplifier input and connecting the output of said second track of said tape recorder to the input of said amplifier.

4. The player system of claim 3, including further means connected to said encoder to encode information as to the on or off condition of said rhythm device, said last-named encoded information being recorded in digital form on said first track.

5. The player system of claim 4, wherein said means for selectively disconnecting said rhythm device comprises switching means responsive to said keying decoder.

6. In a keyboard instrument player system for recording and later recreating a musical performance, an

musical performance while said recorder is in said record mode; decoder means connected between said tape recorder and said tone generator, said tone generator responding to said digital information during said playback mode to recreate said musical performance,

the improvement comprising:

a second magnetic track for said tape recorder;

means for recording in linear form on said second track said selected rhythm patterns, said patterns being recorded simultaneously with said digital information during said musical performance; and

means for reproducing, during said playback mode,

said recorded rhythm patterns simultaneously with the recreation. of said musical performance,

whereby said rhythm sound patterns are synchronized with said recreated musical performance.

7. The player system of claim 6, further including output means connected to said rhythm device for producing rhythm sound patterns; said means for reproducing said recorded rhythm patterns including switch means disconnecting said rhythm device from said output means and connecting the output of said second magnetic track to said output means, whereby said recorded rhythm patterns are reproduced as rhythm sound patterns.

8. The player system of claim 7, wherein said switch means comprises relay means operable in the playback mode of said recorder.

9. The player system of claim 7, wherein said means for recording digital information as to the condition of said keyswitches further includes means for recording digital information as to the operation or nonoperation of said rhythm device, and wherein said switch means is responsive during said playback mode to recorded digital information as to the operation of said rhythm device.

10. A keyboard instrument player system for recording and later recreating a musical performance comprising:

an electrically operated musical instrument including playing key-operated keyswitches;

an electrically operated tone generating system, said keyswitches being connected to said tone generating system to produce pitched musical tones;

a rhythm device for producing selected rhythm patterns of unpitched or semi-pitched musical sounds;

a tape recorder having first and second magnetic tracks;

means operating said tape recorder in either a record or a playback mode;

a time division multiplex keying encoder having its input connected to said keyswitches for encoding information as to the on or off condition of said keyswitches and having its output connected to said tape recorder when said recorder is in the record mode to record said information in digital form on said first magnetic track of said tape recorder;

means for simultaneously recording rhythm sounds from said rhythm device on said second magnetic track of said tape recorder;

a keying decoder connected during said playback mode to the output of said first magnetic track of said tape recorder;

21 series of switches operated by said decoder and connected in parallel with said keyswitches to operate said tone generating system;

an amplifier and a loudspeaker connected to the output of said rhythm device; and

means for disconnecting said rhythm device from said amplifier and loudspeaker and for connecting the output of said second magnetic track to the input of said amplifier.

11. The instrument described in claim 10 wherein said means for disabling said rhythm device and for connecting the output of said second track to the input of said amplifier comprises means controlled by digital information encoded by the encoder and decoded by the decoder.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3865002 *Dec 28, 1973Feb 11, 1975Pioneer Electric CorpAutomatic performance system for electronic instruments
US3868882 *Nov 19, 1973Mar 4, 1975Pioneer Electronic CorpAutomatic musical performance method and apparatus for a keyed instrument
US3878750 *Nov 21, 1973Apr 22, 1975Kapps Charles AProgrammable music synthesizer
US4022097 *Jul 15, 1974May 10, 1977Strangio Christopher EComputer-aided musical apparatus and method
US4132139 *Apr 8, 1977Jan 2, 1979Nippon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki KaishaRhythm selection switch assembly for electronic musical instruments
US4215619 *Dec 22, 1978Aug 5, 1980Cbs Inc.System for recording and automatic playback of a musical performance
US4244259 *Jul 3, 1979Jan 13, 1981Nippon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki KaishaElectronic musical instrument with memory to store tone control information
US4339980 *Aug 29, 1980Jul 20, 1982Helen HookeLoop tape recorder
US4344344 *Aug 18, 1980Aug 17, 1982Nippon Gakki Seizo Kabushiki KaishaElectronic musical instrument having musical performance training system
US5138925 *Jun 29, 1990Aug 18, 1992Casio Computer Co., Ltd.Apparatus for playing auto-play data in synchronism with audio data stored in a compact disc
US5189237 *Dec 10, 1990Feb 23, 1993Casio Computer Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for performing auto-playing in synchronism with reproduction of audio data
US5397853 *Aug 5, 1992Mar 14, 1995Casio Computer Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for performing auto-playing in synchronism with reproduction of audio data and/or image data
US5852795 *Nov 22, 1996Dec 22, 1998New York Gas GroupApparatus for controlling a multiplicity of compressors
US8373055 *Mar 31, 2006Feb 12, 2013Kawai Musical Instruments Mfg. Co., Ltd.Apparatus, method and computer program for switching musical tone output
US20100083814 *Mar 31, 2006Apr 8, 2010Kawai Musical Instruments Mfg. Co., Ltd.Apparatus, Method and Computer Program for Switching Musical Tone Output
EP0406773A2 *Jul 2, 1990Jan 9, 1991Casio Computer Company LimitedAuto-playing apparatus
EP0434006A2 *Dec 18, 1990Jun 26, 1991Casio Computer Company LimitedAuto-playing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/635, 84/DIG.120, 984/351, 84/462, 84/642
International ClassificationG10H1/00, G10H1/26, G10H1/40
Cooperative ClassificationG10H1/40, G10H1/005, G10H2240/325, Y10S84/12
European ClassificationG10H1/40, G10H1/00R2B