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Publication numberUS3830501 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 20, 1974
Filing dateMar 28, 1973
Priority dateMar 28, 1973
Publication numberUS 3830501 A, US 3830501A, US-A-3830501, US3830501 A, US3830501A
InventorsN Fabricant
Original AssigneeN Fabricant
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air impulse board game apparatus
US 3830501 A
Abstract
A toy includes a circular support; a rotatable pointer centrally coupled to the support; and indicia, on the support, surrounding the pointer. The support includes a plurality of radial arrangements, each of the arrangements comprising first and second holes, a set of three holes, and first and second air channels coupling the first and second holes, respectively, to a different hole of the set. The air channels are created by forming the support from a board having grooves on one side and by fixing thereto a groove cover. The holes of the set are slidably engageable with extensions of playing pieces and the first and second holes are engageable with the nozzle of a bellows. A stand is used to support the bellows over the circular support when its nozzle is engaged with a hole. According to one set of game rules, each player rotates the pointer and when the pointer comes to rest moves, according to the indicium towards which the pointer points, the playing piece or the nozzle into engagement with a designated hole. If after such a move the nozzle and a playing piece are coupled by one of the channels, actuation of the bellows will cause an impulse of air to travel through the channel and the playing piece will be ejected from its hole.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Enited tates atet [1 1 Eabricant 51 Aug. 20, 1974 AIR IMPULSE BOARD GAME APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Norman Fabricant, 94-19 64th Rd.,

Rego Park, NY. 11374 [22] Filed: Mar. 28, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 345,629

[52] US. Cl. 273/134 E, 273/134 C, 273/134 D,

Primary ExaminerDelbert B. Lowe Attorney, Agent, or FirmBreitenfeld & Levine [57] ABSTRACT A toy includes a circular support; a rotatable pointer centrally coupled to the support; and indicia, on the support, surrounding the pointer. The support includes a plurality of radial arrangements, each of the arrangements comprising first and second holes, a set of three holes, and first and second air channels coupling the first and second holes, respectively, to a different hole of the set. The air channels are created by forming the support from a board having grooves on one side and by fixing thereto a groove cover. The holes of the set are slidably engageable with extensions of playing pieces and the first and second holes are engageable with the nozzle of a bellows. A stand is used to support the bellows over the circular support when its nozzle is engaged with a hole. According to one set of game rules, each player rotates the pointer and when the pointer comes to rest moves, according to the indicium towards which the pointer points, the playing piece or the nozzle into engagement with a designated hole. If after such a move the nozzle and a playing piece are coupled by one of the channels, actuation of the bellows will cause an impulse of air to travel through the channel and the playing piece will be ejected from its hole.

9 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures AIR IMPULSE BOARD GAME APPARATUS The subject invention relates to toys, and in particular to a toy wherein playing pieces or projectiles are caused to travel by air impulses.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a toy which may be played with by a number of players, and requires physical action by the players.

It is another object of the invention to provide a toy wherein, by chance, a player is given the opportunity to blast the playing piece of one of his opponents from the playing board.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a playing board for a pneumatic toy having air channels which may be manufactured inexpensively on a mass production basis.

In a game using the toy in its preferred form, the rules may require that the players catch ejected projectiles so as to cause the players to exercise and improve their coordination.

Additional objects and features of this invention will become apparent by reference to the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I. is a perspective view of the toy, according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a bottom view of the game board of the toy, a bottom cover of the board being partially broken away to show the grooves which connect the holes in the top layer of the board;-and

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view, taken along lines 3-3 in FIG. 2, showing, in solid lines, a bellows coupled to a projectile by a groove and, in dash lines, a projectile ejected by the rapid compression of the bellows.

A preferred embodiment of the toy, according to the invention, is shown in FIG. 1. In general, the toy includes a circular support projectiles 11 (only one shown) engageable with the support; and pump means 12, engageable with the support,-for ejecting projectiles 11 from the support 10. Typically, each player is provided with a projectile 11 and, as more fully described below, is given the opportunity to operate the pump means 12 to eject a projectile 11 from the support 10.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the support 10 includes a plurality of radial arrangements 13-32. Referring, for example, to arrangements 2830, each of the arrangements has a first hole identified with the arrangement reference numeral followed by the letter a, a second hole identified by the arrangement reference numeral followed by the letter b, and a set of three holes, each one of the set of holes being identified by the arrangement reference numeral followed by a different one of the letters c, d, and e. Each of the c, d, and e holes is preferably surrounded by an upwardly projecting boss 9. In addition, each of the arrangements includes a groove identified by the arrangement reference numeral followed by the letter f, and a groove designated by the arrangement reference numeral followed by the letter g. The grooves are defined by ridges projecting downwardly from the under side of top 33. In each arrangement, the a and b holes are connected by f and g grooves, respectively, to only two of the c, d, and e holes. In other words, one of the (-0 holes of each arrangement is completely isolated, i.e., completely surrounded by a ridge, as for example holes 28d, 29c, and 300. Each of the other two c-e holes of each arrangement communicates with one of the a and b holes. Thus, for example, hole 280 is connected by groove 28g to hole 28b and hole 282 is connected by groove 28f to hole 28a.

The holes a-e of each arrangement 1332 extend completely through the circular top 33 of the support 10 and are serially arranged along an imaginary radius, and each of the holes having the same letter reference lies on the circumference of an imaginary circle, the circle corresponding to the a holes having the smallest diameter. Further, the underside of the top 33 is formed with extensions 35 and the f and g grooves, and a skirt 34 extending from the edge of the top surrounds the grooves and extensions 35. The support includes a bottom layer 36 having holes 37 which serve to guide the layer 36 into abutment with the underside of the top 33 having the grooves. Layer 36 is secured, such as by an adhesive, to the bottom edges of the ridges defining the f and g grooves, thereby converting the f and g grooves into airtight channels such as those designated in FIGS. 2 and 3 with the corresponding arrangement reference numeral followed by the letters h and i, respectively. Since the channels are airtight, each of the channels of an arrangement can be used to transmit an impulse of air from one of the a and b holes to one of the c, d, and e holes. Resilient mounts 40 fixed to the extensions 35 cooperate with the bottom edge of the skirt 34 to support the support 10 on a table top or some other horizontal surface.

The top 33 formed with all the holes and grooves mentioned above and the skirt 34 may be integrally molded of a suitable plastic. The bottom layer 36 may be a circular piece of stiff cardboard. Therefore, it will be appreciated that the support 10 described above offers a very inexpensive way of providing airtight channels.

The pump means 12 include a bellows for pumping a pulse of air through any one of the channels, and a stand 41 for supporting the bellows. More particularly, the bellows includes a collapsible air chamber 42 formed, for example, from a plastic, and a circular nozzle 43 whose outside diameter is slidably, but snugly, engageable with the a or b holes of the support 10 (see FIGS. 1 and 3). The stand 41 rests on the support 10 and supports the air chamber 42 while the nozzle 43 extends axially through the stand 41 from the bottom part of the chamber. The air chamber 42 is axially collapsible and, as a result, when the nozzle is introduced into one of the a and b holes on the support 10, a sharp blow struck against the top of the chamber 42 causes compression of the air chamber along its axis, thereby producing a pulse of air which travels through the channel associated with the hole accommodating the bellows nozzle (see FIG. 3).

Each of the projectiles 11 includes a pin-like extension 45 (FIG. 3) which is snugly but slidably engageable with the c, d, and 2 holes of the support 10. The

projectiles may have an ornamental design suitable to the game being played, such as the ship design shown in FIGS. 1 and 3. Each projectile includes a flat surface 46 (see FIG. 3) which abuts against the top edge of a boss 9 when its extension is engaged with one of the c, d, and e holes. As a result, if a pulse of air is delivered to a projectile associated with a hole, the air acts against the bottom face of extension 45, and the pulse causes the projectile to be ejected from the support 10 (see FIG. 3).

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 3, the top 33 of the support 10 includes a centrally located circular recess 48 to which there is fixed by an adhesive or other equivalent means a circular disk 49 having indicia. In addition, a rotatable pointer 50 is mounted on the game board 33 over the indicia-bearing disk. The indicia and the rotatable pointer are used in accordance with game rules to tell the players of the game the nature of the moves which they can make with either the projectiles or the pump means.

According to one set of rules for the game, a marker, such as a simulated treasure chest 51 (see FIG. I) having a downwardly projecting pin is placed in any of the c-e holes of an arrangement to indicate a start and finish position for the projectiles 11 (only one shown) of two players. The start and finish position is purposely made changeable and arbitrary so as to avoid the possibility of players remembering which holes in each arrangement are interconnected by the hidden air channels. Each player spins the pointer 50 and, starting at the treasure chest, moves his projectile along a generally circular path from one arrangement to the next the number of spaces indicated in the area of disk 49 over which the pointer stops. Thus, a player with a projectile in one of the c-e holes of arrangement 20, for example, who spins a 2, as shown in FIG. 1, will move his projectile to one of the c-e holes of arrangement 18. Whenever the pointer points to an area which also bears the word Blast, the player first moves his ship, i.e., the projectile 11, the number of arrangements or spaces indicated on the disk 49, and then places the nozzle 43 of the pump means in one of the a and b holes which correspond to an arrangement supporting another players projectile (see FIG. 3). Thereafter, the player strikes the collapsible chamber 42 and if his opponents projectile is blasted from the board, the projectile is moved back five spaces. If the moving projectile is caught by an opponent it is only moved back three spaces. If no projectile is ejected, the next player takes his turn. The player who spins a Blast may also try to eject his own projectile from the board. If successful, he moves his projectile ahead five spaces. The first player to reach the treasure chest wins the game.

It will be appreciated, from FIG. 2, that the interconnection of the holes by the channels in the different arrangements is varied and arbitrary. As a result, when a player completes his move, he hopes to place his projectile in the one of the holes -6 which is isolated, and hence cannot be blasted from the support (unless of course he chooses to try to blast his own projectile from the support). However, since the air channels are hidden, he cannot be sure. Also, when a player seeks to blast an opponents projectile from the support, he hopes to place the nozzle 43 of pump means 12 into the one of the holes a and b which communicates with the hole in which his opponents projectile is located, but again he cannot be certain which is the correct hole.

In the embodiment described above, the holes of the arrangements 13-32 pass perpendicularly through the board 33. However, if desired, the holes could pass through at some other angle. Further, although the f and g grooves have been described and illustrated as being formed in the bottom surface of the board 33, the grooves could alternatively be formed in the upper surface of. cover 36. Under these circumstances, the location of the grooves in the bottom layer 36 would of course be carefully determined so that when the top and bottom layers of the support are mated, the grooves properly register with the holes in the board In addition, although a pointer 50 and disk 49 are shown for determining the movements by the players, other means such as dice or a stack of cards could be used for this purpose.

What is more, although the present example shows each arrangement including first and second holes (a and b) and a set of three holes (ce), the concept includes any format in which one hole of the set is isolated. Thus, there might be only one hole 0 adapted to receive nozzle 43 and two holes, say c and d, in the set, only one of which is connected by an air channel to hole a. In general, in each arrangement there will usually be one less nozzle hole than the number of holes for receiving projectiles.

In view of the fact that other similar changes will be obvious to those skilled in the art, it is to be understood that the description herein of a preferred embodiment according to the invention is set forth as an example thereof and is not to be construed or interpreted as a limitation on the claims which follow and define the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A toy comprising:

a. a support having a plurality of arrangements, each of said arrangements including a first hole, a set of at least two holes, and a channel coupling the first hole to only one of the holes in the set, at least one hole of each set being unconnected to any channel;

b. a projectile slidably engageable with the sets of holes of said arrangements; and 0. pump means engageable with said first holes of said arrangements, whereby if the projectile and pump means are engaged with holes coupled by a channel and the pump means are actuated the projectile is caused to leave its hole on the board, but if the projectile is engaged with a hole unconnected to a channel the projectile cannot be caused to leave that hole by operation of the pump means. 2. A toy as defined in claim I wherein at least one of the arrangements further includes a second hole engageable with the pump means, and a second channel; and wherein said set of holes of said one arrangement includes at least three holes, the second channel coupling the second hole to any one of the holes of the set, other than the hole of the set coupled to said firsthole.

3. A toy as defined in claim 1 wherein the pump means includes a bellows having a nozzle, the nozzle being engageable with the first hole of the arrangements.

4. A toy as defined in claim 1, further including indicia located on the support in a circular array, and a pointer rotatably mounted on the support so that when the pointer is at rest it points towards an indicium of the indicia.

5. A toy as defined in claim I wherein the support includes a top having the first hole and sets of holes of said arrangements, and a plurality of grooves, each of the grooves coupling a first hole of an arrangement to one of the holes of the set of holes corresponding to the same arrangement; and a layer coupled to the top and closing said grooves whereby said grooves and cover provide the channels of the arrangements.

has a pin-like projection adapted to be snugly but slidably accommodated by any hole of said set.

9. A toy as defined in claim 8 including a boss surrounding each hole of said set, said boss having a flat top surface, and wherein each projectile has a flat bottom surface surrounding its pin-like projection, said bottom surface bing adapted to engage said boss when the projectile and a hole of said set are engaged.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US262066 *Jul 1, 1881Aug 1, 1882 Hob ast linton
US1419074 *Feb 12, 1921Jun 6, 1922Floyd O BowersGame
US2952461 *Jun 19, 1957Sep 13, 1960Anthony D BoulangerTravel game with non-losable parts
US3211459 *Mar 8, 1963Oct 12, 1965Kropinski John JGame apparatus based on simulated rocket flight
US3752481 *Mar 3, 1972Aug 14, 1973N FabricantPneumatic board game apparatus
GB873165A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4449709 *Jun 1, 1982May 22, 1984Mckay RobertBoard game having means for ejection of playing pieces
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/249, 273/287, 273/139
International ClassificationA63F3/00, A63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F9/0079
European ClassificationA63F9/00N