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Publication numberUS3831360 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1974
Filing dateNov 2, 1972
Priority dateNov 5, 1971
Also published asDE2249947A1
Publication numberUS 3831360 A, US 3831360A, US-A-3831360, US3831360 A, US3831360A
InventorsHorvath L
Original AssigneeHeberlein & Co Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Texturized staple fiber structures
US 3831360 A
Abstract
Method and means for forming continuously by high-twisting a bundle of endless filaments, and grinding or cutting same while in the high-twisted state. The high-twisted bundle may be heat set before or after the grinding or cutting action, or not at all.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O United States Patent 1 1 11 1 3,831,360

Horvath Aug. 27, 1974 1 [541 TEXTURIZED STAPLE FIBER 2,184,254 12/1939 Koster 57/2 RES 2,278,879 4/1942 Hunter 19/.64 X STRUCTU 2,570,173 10/1951 Von Koborn 19/.32 [75] Inventor: Lajos Horvath, Wallisellen, 3,001,358 9/1961 Mayner 57/2 X Switzerland 3,017,684 1/1962 Pittman 19/.32 X 3,379,003 4/1968 Kanbar 57/157 TS [731 Asslgneei l & Gan, 3,435,608 4/1969 Stanley 19/32 x swlmrland 3,516,241 6/1970 Nakano et a1. 19/.32 x

[22] Filed: Nov. 2, 1972 [21] APPL 303,002 Primary Examiner-John W. Huckert Assistant ExaminerCharles Gorenstein Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper [30] F orelgn Application Priority Data & Scinto Nov. 5, 1971 Switzerland 16105/71 Mar. 9, 1972 Switzerland 3472/72 [57] ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl 57/2, 19/.32, 19/.64, 7

57/34 HS 57/157 T5 Method and means for forming continuously by high- [51] I t, Cl. D02 1/02, D02 3/00, [302 3/34 twisting a bundle of endless filaments, and grinding or [58 Field of Search 57/2, 140 R, 157 R, 34 R, cutting Same while in the high-twisted State- The high- 5 7/34 HS. 157 TS; ]9/.32,.64 twisted bundle may be heat set before or after the grinding or cutting action, or not at all.

[56] References Cited H t. UNITED STATES PATENTS 21 3 Draw F'gms 2.156.723 5/1939 Esselmann et a1. 19/.32 X

1 TEXTURIZED STAPLE FIBER STRUCTURES This invention relates to the production of staple fiber structures.

It is known to produce staple fiber yams from bundles of endless synthetic filaments by periodically cutting continuously advancing fiber bundles or bringing them into frictional contact with grinding means, and by spinning the thus-obtained staple fibers by imparting a twist to obtain smooth staple fiber yarns therefrom. French Patent No. 790,092, British Patent No. 633,1 I and U.S. Pat. No. 2,077,320 are of interest in this respect.

It is also known to crimp endless filament cables consisting of synthetic material such as polyamides and polyesters and thereafter to cut them into staple fibers (German Auslegeschrift 1,033,841). It has, however, been scarcely possible, to date, to spin crimped staple fibers from loose flocks; slubs being easily formed which cause particular difficulties while stretching the rovings.

By means of the novel concept of the present invention, I am able to avoid the disadvantages of the known systems for producing crimped staple fiber yarns, and am able continuously to produce textured staple fiber structures from bundles of filaments of thermoplastic material.

According to the present invention, a bundle of endless filaments which has been subjected to usual temporary high-twisting, preferably by means of a false-twist device, and to heat setting in the high-twisted state is brought, when. in high-twisted state, into frictional contact with grinding or cutting means (hereinafter referred to as grinding means) and thereby converted into a staple fiber structure. Apparatus suitable for execution of the process of the present invention consists of at least one each filament delivery device, heating element, false-twist imparter and wind-up device, and is characterized in that grinding or cutting means are provided in the false-twisting path before or after the heating element for heat-setting the false-twist.

l have also found that it is possible to obtain textured staple fiber structures if heat-setting in the high-twisted state is entirely omitted, whereby the process can be made far less expensive. Thus, a further possibility, according to the present invention, is characterized in that the filament bundles are temporarily high-twisted by means of a false-twist device and are brought into frictional contact with the grinding means without heat-setting of the false-twist.

is shown in the accompanying drawings, forming a part of the specification, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of an apparatus for effecting the process of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a detail of FIG. 1 at an enlarged scale;

F IG. 3 is a detail view of another form of the apparatus of FIG. 1 in longitudinal section; and

FIGS. 4 and 5 are views similar to FIG. 1, but illustrating the grinding means in different attitudes relatively to the advancing filament bundle.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, it will be seen that the filament bundle l 1 drawn off from delivery bobbin 1 successively passes through a thread-brake 2, a delivery device 3, 3', a heating element 4, a grinding or cutting device 10, a false-twist imparter 7, a second delivery device 8, 8' and finally reaches a winding-up shaft 9 by means of which the staple fiber structure 12 is wound up. Means (10), capable of grinding or cutting fibers, comprises two thread-guides, 5, 5', the purpose of which consists in braking the filament balloon caused by the false-twist imparter and to stabilize the direction of the filament bundle l l, and a rotating disc 6, the rim of which may be coated with a grinding agent such, for example, as carborundum, or provided with cutting ribs, serves to form the staple fibers. The disc 6 may rotate in the same or the'opposite direction with respect to the direction of filament movement, a difference between the circumferential speed of the rotating disc 6 and the speed of the filament bundle 11 being necessary. The circumferential speed of disc 6 should be preferably higher than the speed of the filament bundle 11 and, for example, it may amount to between 5 and 10 times the speed of the filament bundle. The length of the contact path of the filament bundle 11 with the disc 6 and the pressure on the disc 6 can be selected by providing for modification of the mutual positions of the'disc 6 and the thread-guides 5, 5'. Exchangeable, different grinding or cutting discs with various sizes of grinding grains or cutting ribs may be used according to the titer of the filament bundle or filaments. The

' of filament movement; and the grinding or cutting de- There has thus been outlined rather broadly the more important features of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of

course, additional features of the invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject of the claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception upon which this disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures for carrying out the several purposes of the invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent construction as do not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention.

A specific embodiment of the invention has been chosen for purposes of illustration and description, and

vice 10 may also be provided upstream from the heating element 4.

According to the example of FIG. 3, instead of a special grindingor cutting device, a twist tube 13 may be used. In the latter case, at the filament output extremity of the tube 13, there is provided a false-twist imparter consisting of a forked head 14 with a pin 15 of hard material such as, for example, sapphire passing across the fork gap. At the extremity of twist tube 13 forming the filament input, there is provided an annular collar 16 which may be provided with a coating or grinding agent or with cutting ribs or edges or similar means. The filament bundle 11 from the heating element 4 enters into the twist tube at an angle so as to pass over and in contact with the collar 16, and then over pin 15 around which it has been looped.

According to FIGS. 4 and 5, the structure for advancing the bundle is similar to that of FIG. 1 and similar reference numerals identify similar elements. In FIG. 4 however, the grinding means 10 is arranged so that the axis of rotation of the cutting wheel or disc 6 extends obliquely with respect to the filament path; and in FIG. 5, the grinding means 10 is arranged so that the axis of rotation of the wheel or disc 6 extends parallel to the direction of filament, movement.

While false-twisting the filament bundle 11, all filaments are wound about a filament lying in the center of thefilament bundle and rotating about its own axis, whereby those filamentswhich are very close to the central filament make a shorter path than the outer filaments. Thus, tension differences arise in the various filaments which cause the filaments to change their place continuously, i.e., the outer filaments successively penetrate into the center of the bundle while the inner filaments eventually reach the surface of the filament bundle. Therefore, it will be seen that periodically along the length of the bundle, all the filaments reach the surface where they are cut by the grinding disc 6. Depending on the number of filaments in the bundle, of the fil ament titers, and on the number of turns of the filament bundle per meter, staple fibers of a length of between 30 and 100 mm are obtained.

It is advantageous to impart to the filament bundles to be treated, according to the process of the present invention, a relatively high initial twist. This initial twist may be in filament bundles of a total titer of more than 150 dtex, approximately between 100 and 300 turns per meter and, in filament bundles with a total titer of less than 150 dtex, between approximately 200 and 400 turns per meter. In this way, the staple fiber structure 12, after leaving the false-twist imparter 7, is not disintegrated. The process of the present invention is suitable for the treatment of filament bundles of synthetic material such as polyamides, polyesters, materials on a vinylic base (polyacrylonitrile) or polyolefines. Furthermore, it is also possible to use filament bundles of cellulose acetate.

In order to avoid torque, two staple fiber structures may be ply-twisted. Furthermore, the staple fiber structures, after passage through the second delivery mechanism 8, 8 and before being wound-up at reduced tension, may be passed through a second heating element 17, also under reduced tension (which is shown in P16. 1 by a dashed line), whereby its elasticity is reduced.

The process of the present invention also makes it possible to produce mixed spun yarns from crimped synthetic staple fibers with natural staple fibers such as wool and cotton. It is preferable then to submit a filament bundle of synthetic material having a relatively coarse titer to the false-twist texturing treatment and to the grinding or cutting treatment, and to use the thusobtained staple fiber structure as roving for mixing with the natural fibers.

Some examples of the process of the present inven tion will be described hereinafter in which the apparatus according to FIG. 1 has been used. Examples 7 and 8 describe the process of using the apparatus of FIG. 1 in which the heating element 4 has been omitted.

' EXAMPLE 1 A bundle of polypropylene filaments of a titer of dtex 220 30 having an initial twist of 300 turns per meter in s direction is temporarily high-twisted to 2000 turns per meter in z direction. In the high-twisted state, the filament bundle is heated to 165C for one second. The thread-guides 5, of the grinding disc 6 are arranged so that the filament bundle contacts the grinding disc rotating oppositely with respect to the movement of the filaments over a length of 30 mm; the circumferential speed of the grinding disc is 500 meter per minute. Fi-

nally, two temporarily high-twisted filament bundles are ply-twisted at 250 t/m in z direction. By slight steaming in loose condition, the ply-yarn becomes voluminous, elastic and assumes a warm, wool-like hand.

EXAMPLE 2 A bundle of polyester filaments (polyethylene glycol terephtalate), dtex 84x15, having an initial twist of 400 t/m in 5 direction is temporarily high-twisted to 3000 t/m in z direction. Heat-setting is effected at 225 C for 0.8 seconds. The filament bundle passes over the surface of grinding disc 6 rotating oppositely with respect to the direction of filament movement over a contact path 20 mm long, the circumferential speed of the grinding disc being between 400 and 600 m/minute. Finally, two temporarily high-twisted filament bundles are ply-twisted with 300 t/m in z direction. Woven and knitted fabrics produced from such a ply-yarn become voluminous and elastic by slight steaming or dry heating to temperatures of between and C in tensionless condition, and an agreeable, warm hand is imparted to them.

EXAMPLE 3 A filament bundle of polyamide 6.6 (polyhexamethylene adipamide), dtex 75X23, is treated as described in Example 2, the heat-setting temperature being, however, reduced to 220 C and the filament bundle being passed over the grinding surface of the grinding disc at an angle of 45 with respect to the axis of the grinding disc. Textiles manufactured from the obtained ply-yarn present a full and warm hand, are elastic and have good covering properties.

Example 4 A filament bundle of polyamide 6 (polymerization product of Epsilon-caprolactam), dtex l l0 24, having an initial twist of 350 t/m is temporarily high-twisted to 2800 t/m in 5 direction, the feeding speed of the filament bundle being 50 m/min, and is heated to 180 C for one second in the high-twisted state. The filament bundle passes over a length of 20 mm over the surface of the grinding disc rotating in the direction of the filament movement, the circumferential speed of the grinding disc being 500 m/minute. Interlock fabrics produced from the obtained staple fiber yarn become voluminous and elastic by slight steaming in tensionless condition and have a warm and agreeable hand.

EXAMPLE 5 A filament bundle of cellulose 2 V2 acetate of dtex 220x33 having an initial twist of 400 t/m s is temporarily high-twisted to 1,800 t/m in 5 direction and heated to 180 C in the high-twisted state for 1.5 seconds. The filament bundle passes over the surface of the grinding disc rotating oppositely with respect to the filament movement over a length of 30 mm, the circumferential speed of the grinding disc being 250 m/minute. Textiles containing the thus-obtained staple fiber yarn have a decent lustre and an agreeable, warm hand.

EXAMPLE 6 A polyacrylonitrile filament bundle of dtex 330 with an initial twist of 200 t/m is temporarily high-twisted to 1000 t/m in z direction, the speed of the filament bundle being 40 m/minute. A similar fiber bundle having an initial twist of 600 t/m in z direction is temporarily high-twisted to 1400 t/m in s direction. In the hightwisted state, the two filament bundles are heated to 225 C for 1.2 seconds and pass over the surface of the grinding disc rotating at 400 m/minute in the direction of the filament movement, the contact path extending over 40 mm. The thus-treated filament bundles are plytwisted at 200 t/m in 5 direction. Textiles produced from such a ply-yarn show a pronounced wool-like character.

EXAMPLE 7 A filament bundle of polyamide 6.6 (polyhexamethylene adipamide) of dtex 155x46 having an initial twist of 400 t/m in 5 direction is temporarily twisted over the zero point to 2000 t/m in z direction. On the distance between the pair of delivery rollers 3, 3' and the twist imparter 7, the filament bundle is passed through the grinding device 10 in temporarily high-twisted state and pressed against the grinding disc 6 over a length of mm by means of thread-guides 5, 5', said disc rotating at a cricumferential speed of 700 m/minute oppositely with respect to filament movement. The filament bundle passes through the apparatus at a speed of 50 m/minute; the yarn tension on the false-twist path is chosen to be approximately p. Two thus-treated filament bundles are finally ply-twisted at 100 turns per meter in 5 direction. Woven and knitted fabrics produced from such a ply-yarn present good covering properties, a soft and warm hand and have a relatively low elasticity.

EXAMPLE 8 A polypropylene filament bundle of dtex 220x with an initial twist of 500 t/m in s direction is temporarily high-twisted to 1800 tm/ in z direction over the zero point and pressed against the surface'of the grinding disc 6 over a length of 30 mm by means of the thread-guides 5, 5', said disc rotating in the direction of movement of the filament bundle. The circumferential speed of the grinding disc is 700 m/minute and the filament speed m/minute. Woven and knitted fabrics produced from thus-treated filament bundles have a noticeably improved hand and improved covering properties.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that I contribute. by my invention, novel texturized staple fiber structures as well as novel apparatus and method for making same which avoid the disadvantages of the prior art noted heretofore.

I believe that the construction and operation of my novel apparatus and the practice of the processes disclosed herein, will now be understood; and that the advantages of my contribution will be fully appreciated by those persons skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. Process for the continuous production of textured staple fiber structures from filament bundles of thermoplastic material, characterized by subjecting a bundle of endless filaments to temporary high-twisting by means of a false-twist device and to heat-setting in the high-twisted state, and bringing said bundle into frictioncontact with grinding means while said bundle is in the high-twisted state upstream of said false-twist device thereby to convert said bundle into a staple fiber structure.

2. Process according to claim 1, characterized in that the filament bundle is brought into frictional contact with the grinding means after heat-setting in the hightwisted state.

3. Process according to claim 1, characterized in that the filament bundle is brought into frictional contact with the grinding means before heat-setting in the hightwisted state.

4. Process according to claim 1, characterized in that the staple fiber structure is subjected to a second heatsetting operation under reduced tension.

5. A process as in claim 1 wherein said bundle of endless filaments are cellulose acetate filaments.

6. Textured staple fiber structure produced according to the process of claims 5.

7. Textured staple fiber structure produced according to the process of claim 1.

8. Apparatus for effecting continuous production of textured staple fiber structures from filament bundles of thermoplastic material, comprising filament delivery means, heating means, false-twist and wind-up means, characterized in that a grinding means (10) is provided along the path of said bundle upstream from the falsetwist means.

9. Apparatus according to claim 8, characterized in that the grinding means (10) is arranged between the heating element (4) for heat-setting the false-twist and the false-twist imparter (7).

10. Apparatus according to claim 8, characterized in that the grinding means (10) is arranged upstream of the heating element (4) for heat-setting the false-twist.

11. Apparatus according to claim 8, characterized in that the grinding means consists of a rotating grinding or cutting disc (6) and of thread guides (5, 5').

12. Apparatus according to claim 11, characterized in that a difference of speed exists between the circumferential speed of the rotating disc (6) and the speed of the filament bundle to be treated.

13. Apparatus according to claim 12, characterized in that the disc (6) rotates in the direction of filament movement.

14. Apparatus according to claim 12, characterized in that the disc (6) rotates in a direction opposite to that of filament movement.

15. Apparatus according to claim 11, characterized in that the circumferential speed of the rotating disc (6) is higher than the speed of the filament bundle to be treated.

16. Apparatus according to claim 15, characterized in that the circumferential speed of the rotating disc (6) is between 5 and 10 times higher than the speed of the filament bundle to be treated.

17. Apparatus according to claim 11, characterized in that the axis of rotation of the disc (6) is perpendicular to the direction of filament movement.

18. Apparatus according to claim 11, characterized in that the axis of rotation of the disc (6) extends obliquely with respect to the filament path.

19. Apparatus according to claim 11, characterized in that the axis of rotation of disc (6) extends parallel to the direction of filament movement.

20. Apparatus according to claim 11, characterized in that different exchangeable discs (6) having different grinding or cutting characteristics may be used.

21. Apparatus according to claim 8, characterized in that the false-twist means includes a twist tube (13) at the output extremity of which is arranged the falsetwist imparter (l4) and at the input extremityof which is provided an annular collar (16) with grinding or cutting means.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3928958 *Oct 29, 1974Dec 30, 1975Asahi Chemical IndMethod for producing spun yarn-like bulked yarns
US3946548 *Jul 5, 1974Mar 30, 1976Teijin LimitedBulky multifilament yarn and process for manufacturing the same
US3987614 *Aug 6, 1974Oct 26, 1976Hoechst AktiengesellschaftVoluminous filament yarn
US3991549 *Sep 27, 1974Nov 16, 1976Hoechst AktiengesellschaftFilament yarn and process to prepare same
US4055938 *Nov 8, 1976Nov 1, 1977Platt Saco Lowell LimitedOpen-end spinning
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US4121412 *May 10, 1977Oct 24, 1978Toray Industries, Inc.Spun yarn and process for manufacturing the same
US4164836 *May 31, 1978Aug 21, 1979Teijin Seiki Company LimitedBulky yarn producing apparatus
US4297837 *Dec 5, 1979Nov 3, 1981Barmag Barmer Maschinenfabrik AktiengesellschaftMethod and apparatus for producing spun yarn characteristics in synthetic multifilament yarns
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US4365394 *Mar 22, 1979Dec 28, 1982Toray Industries, Inc.Method for producing an interlaced multifilament yarn
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US7013542 *Mar 17, 2004Mar 21, 2006Unitech Textile Machinery S.P.A.Process and apparatus for the transformation of yarns and a yarn thus produced
US7127784Feb 15, 2005Oct 31, 2006Milliken & CompanyTreatment of filament yarns to provide spun-like characteristics and yarns and fabrics produced thereby
US20040216278 *Mar 17, 2004Nov 4, 2004Pierluigi MarraniProcess and apparatus for the transformation of yarns and a yarn thus produced
US20050244637 *Feb 15, 2005Nov 3, 2005Goineau Andre MTreatment of filament yarns to provide spun-like characteristics and yarns and fabrics produced thereby
US20060200956 *Apr 15, 2003Sep 14, 2006Alfio VezilMethod and device for the mechanical treatment of a yarn particularly a synthetic multi-strand yarn, and yarn produced in this way
US20160095381 *Oct 1, 2014Apr 7, 2016Shanghai Uniwise International Co. Ltd.Composite waterproof breathable sock with two-way extensible properties
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/2, 19/.64, 57/284, 28/219, 28/220
International ClassificationD02J3/02, D02J3/00, D02G1/02
Cooperative ClassificationD02G1/0246
European ClassificationD02G1/02B6