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Publication numberUS3831850 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1974
Filing dateMay 30, 1973
Priority dateMay 30, 1973
Publication numberUS 3831850 A, US 3831850A, US-A-3831850, US3831850 A, US3831850A
InventorsT Hunter
Original AssigneeT Hunter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray gun assembly having stir means
US 3831850 A
Abstract
A pneumatic spray gun container assembly having a suction tube through which a substance to be sprayed, such as paint, feeds from the container proper of the assembly to the spray gun. A stirrer, such as a flexible paddle, is fixed to the suction tube within the container, and the container is rotatable relative to the tube and stirrer to effect stirring of the container contents periodically during spraying operation without opening the container. A finger operated latch is provided for releasably securing the suction tube and container in a fixed relative angular position between stirrings.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,831,850 Hunter 1 Aug. 27, 1974 SPRAY GUN ASSEMBLY HAVING STIR 3,412,937 11/1968 Chamberlain 239/142 MEANS Primary Examiner--Lloyd L. King Assistant Examiner-Andres Kashnikow Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Boniard 1. Brown 5 7 ABSTRACT A pneumatic spray gun container assembly having a suction tube through which a substance to be sprayed, such as paint, feeds from the container proper of the assembly to the spray gun. A stirrer, such as a flexible paddle, is fixed to the suction tube within the con tainer, and the container is rotatable relative to the tube and stirrer to effect stirring of the container contents periodically during spraying operation without opening the container. A finger operated latch is provided for releasably securing the suction tube and con tainer in a fixed relative angular position between stirrings.

13 Claims, 7 Drawing; Figures I 47 6 0 40 /'1 at i I 1 g I 52 l 4% Fl] PAIENIEMucznsu [1? saw MP 3 v BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to pneumatic spray guns and the like and more particularly to a novel spray gun container assembly for containing and effecting periodic stirring of the substance being sprayed without opening the container proper of the assembly.

2. Prior Art As will appear from the ensuing description, the spray gun container assembly of the invention may be utilized on spray guns for spraying vertically any sprayable substance which requires periodic stirring to maintain the substance in proper spraying condition. However, the primary application of the container assembly involves spraying paint. The container assembly will be described in connection with this application. In this regard, it is significant to note at the outset that in the context of the present disclosure the term paint is used in a broad sense to encompass all sprayable surface coatings, including but not limited to sanding primers, surface primers, and the more usual points, particularly metallic paints, metal fleck paints, polyester fleck paints, pearlescent paints and the like.

A conventional paint spray gun has a spray gun head, referred to herein simply as a spray gun, and a container assembly for containing the paint to be sprayed.

This container assembly includes a paint container proper having a removable cover which is secured to the container by a cover clamp, and a suction tube extending through the container to a position adjacent the container bottom and through the container cover and cover clamp to the spray gun. On the upper end of the suction tube is a coupling for securing the tube to the gun. The gun is supplied with high pressure air which asperates paint from the paint container through the suction tube and expels the paint through the gun nozzle in the form of a finely atomized spray.

Conventional spray guns of this kind have one inherent disadvantage with which the present invention is concerned. This disadvantage stems from the fact that many if not all paints of the kind contemplated in the present invention are composed of various constituents which tend to separate. As a consequence, it is essential that such paints be stirred or otherwise agitated periodically during a spraying operation to maintain them in the properly thoroughly mixed or homogeneous condition for optimum spraying. Unless the paints are thus agitated at'frequent intervals, separation of the paint constituents will occur, with various resultant adverse effects, such as spraying of blotches, nonuniform coating of the work surface, clogging of the spray gun, and the like.

The disadvantage of conventional spray guns resides in the fact that the only effective way of agitating or stirring the paint being sprayed is to open the paint container and manually stir the paint with a paddle or the like. This requires release of the paint container cover clamp, removal of the container from the spray gun, stirring of the paint, and reassembly of the container on the spray gun. The entire operation is quite time consuming and, since it must be repeated at relatively frequent intervals, i.e., about every twenty minutes or so, it extends substantially the time required to complete a spraying job.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention avoids the above disadvantage of conventional spray guns which permits the paint or other substance being sprayed to be agitated or stirred without removal, opening, closing, and reassembly of the spray gun container. To this end, the invention provides a container assembly for a spray gun having a container proper for the substance to be sprayed. Extending through this container to a position adjacent the container bottom and through the container top or cover is the usual suction tube mounting an upper coupling for connection to the spray gun, i.e., spray gun head. The container cover may be secured to the container by the usual cover clamp arrangement commonly used in spray guns.

This cover clamp comprises a bridge which extends diametrically over the cover and releasably secured at its ends to diametrically opposite sides of the container mouth. Between this bridge and the cover is a rotary cam or wedge-like clamp member which is rotatable, by means of a radially projecting handle, between cover-locking or clamping and cover-releasing positions. When in locking position, the clamp member clamps the cover firmly against the rim of the container mouth. When in releasing position, the clamp member releases the clamping pressure on the cover to permit removal or separation of the container from the clamp bridge and removal of the cover from the container.

According to the present invention, the suction tube is journalled for rotation in the container cover and extends rotatably through the cover clamp member and bridge. Accordingly, when the container assembly is installed on the spray gun, the container may be manually rotated about the suction tube. Fixed to the suction tube within the container is a stirrer, such as a paddle, disposed in scraping contact with the side and bottom walls of the container. When the container is rotated, the stirrer or paddle effectively undergoes relative rotation through the container contents to stir the latter without removal of the container from the spray gun.

The disclosed stirrer is a flexible paddle which guides in a direction opposite to the direction of its relative rotation through the contents of the container when the latter is rotated. This yielding action prevents wedging or binding of the paddle in the container. According to another feature of the invention, a readily finger operated latch is provided for releasably locking the container in a fixed angular position and, thereby, the container in a fixed angular position relative to the spray gun.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view of a spray gun and container assembly according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary front elevation of the spray gun;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of the spray gun structure shown in FIG. 3 illustrating an anti-rotation or indexing latch of the invention in latching position;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing the latch released;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged side elevation of the spray gun and container assembly of the invention with parts broken away; and

FIG. 6 is a section taken on line 6-6 in FIG. illustrating the yielding action of the stirring paddle.

FIG. 7 is a section taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The drawings illustrate a paint sprayer 10 including a spray gun l2 proper and a container assembly 14 for containing the paint to be sprayed. Spray gun R2 is conventional and hence need not be described in elaborate detail. Suffice it to say that the spray gun includes a body 16 having a downturned hand grip 18 at one end, a removable nozzle 20 at the other end, and a threaded suction fitting 22 at the underside of the body, just to the rear of the nozzle 20. Secured to and extending from the butt end of the hand grip I8 is an air inlet fitting 24 for connection to an air hose 26. Hose 26 connects to a source (not shown) of high pressure air.

Extending through the spray gun body 16 is an air passage (not shown) communicating the air inlet 24 to the nozzle orifice 28. A valve (not shown) is located in this air passage for controlling air flow through the passage to the nozzle orifice. This valve is normally closed to block air flow through the passage and is operatively connected to a trigger 30 pivotally mounted on the gun body 16 in such a way that the valve is opened to permit air flow to the nozzle orifice 28 by rearward depression of the trigger toward the hand grip 18.

Within the air passage in the vicinity of the suction fitting 22 is a venturi (not shown) through which air flow occurs to the nozzle orifice 28. This air flow creates a suction within the passage through the fitting 22.

The container assembly 14 constitutes the major contribution of the present invention. This container assembly includes a container body 32 proper for containing the substance 34 to be sprayed, in this instance, paint. Container body 32 has a side wall 36, bottom wall 38, and an open top or mouth surrounded by a rim 40. The open mouth of the container body is closed by a removable cover 44 releasably secured to the container body by cover clamping means 46. Cover 44 has a vent port 47. Container body 32 and its cover 44, when clamped to the body, form a closed container which, for convenience, is hereafter referred to as container 32. The cover forms the top wall of this container.

Extending through the interior of the container 32 to a position adjacent the bottom container wall 38 is a suction tube 48. Sucrion tube 48 extends through the center of the container cover 44 and the cover clamping means 46. On the upper end of the suction tube is a coupling member or nut 50 which is threaded on the suction fitting 22 of the spray gun 12.

From the description to this point, it is apparent that when the spray gun trigger 30 is depressed, high velocity air flow occurs through the spray gun air passage to the nozzle orifice 28. This air flow produces a suction in the interior passage of the suction tube 48 which draws paint 34 from the container 32 into the air stream flowing through the spray gun air passage. The paint is entrained in the air stream and expelled as a finely atomized spray through the nozzle orifice 28.

As noted earlier, the paint 34 within the container 32 must be agitated or stirred at frequent intervals to prevent separation of the paint ingredients and thereby maintain the paint in the proper condition for spraying.

According to this invention, the container assembly 14 is uniquely constructed to permit this periodic stirring action without removal of the paint container 32 from the spray gun 12.

To this end the container 32 is rotatable by hand relative to the suction tube 48. Fixed to the tube within the container is a stirrer 52. When the container is rotated on the suction tube, as indicated by the arrow in FIG. I, the stirrer 52 and the paint 34 within the container undergo relative rotation with resultant relative rotational motion of the stirrer through the paint. This relative motion of the stirrer effectively agitates or stirs the paint to maintain the latter in a thoroughly mixed h0- mogeneous state suitable for spraying.

Referring in greater detail to the particular container assembly 14 selected for illustration, the container 32 has a jar-like shape with its upper end reduced somewhat in diameter to form the container mouth. The container cover 44 includes a cap 54 with a downturned peripheral flange 56 which fits over the container rim 40. Fixed to the inside of this cap is a sealing disc or gasket 58 which seats on the rim. At the center of the cover cap 54 is an enlarged or thickened portion 60 having a central bore forming a bearing.

The cover clamping means 46 comprises a bridge 64 having an upwardly arching central section 66 which extends over and diametrically across the cover 44 and terminates in downturned ends 68 which straddle the cover and the container rim 40. These bridge ends have lateral slots 70 which open through opposite edges of the ends and hence in the same circumferential direction of the container 32. Projecting from diametrically opposite sides of the container, just below its rim 40, are a pair of pins 72 which engage in the bridge slots 70. The container 32 may thus be secured to and released from the bridge 64 by rotating the container relative to the bridge to engage the pins 72 in and retract the pins from the bridge slots 70.

Turning to FIG. 5, the bridge central section 66 has a bottom channel-like cross-section with aligned bores 74 in its upper and lower walls at the center of the bridge. Rotatably journalled in these bores is a rotary clamp member or wedge 76. The upper end of this clamp member extends above the bridge 64 and is enlarged to form a shoulder 78. The lower end of the clamp member extends below the bridge and has a reduced lower extension which extends rotatably through the container cover bearing 60. At the upper end of this extension is a shoulder 82 on the clamp member 76 which seats against the upper side of the cover bearing. The lower end of the extension extends below the cover bearing and mounts a nut 84 which secures the cover 44 in position on the clamp member 76 between its shoulder 82 and the nut. Sufficient clearance is provided to permit free relative rotation of the cover and clamp member.

Rotary clamp member 76 has a pair of annular shoulders 86 and 88. Shoulder 86 is located within the bridge 64 in a plane normal to the axis of the clamp member. Shoulder 88 is located directly below and in a plane inclined at an acute angle to the shoulder 86. Shoulder 88 has a diameter (in the plane of FIG. 5) larger than that of the lower bore 74 in the bridge 64 and serves as an inclined locking shoulder. It will be seen that this locking shoulder extends through the lower bridge bore 74, which is elongated normal to the plane of FIG. 5 to pass the shoulder, so as to engage under the lower bridge wall at one side of the bore and over this wall at the opposite side of the bore.

Rotation of the clamp member 76 is thus effective to move or cam the member axially relative to the bridge 64. The container cover 44, being secured to the clamp member, moves with the member relative to the bridge. Thus rotation of the clamp member in one direction draws the cover toward the bridge and away from the container rim 40. Rotation of the member in the opposite direction moves the cover away from the bridge and toward the container rim. It will be understood, therefore, that when the bridge. 64 is secured to the container pins 72, the cover 44 may be clamped against the container rim 40 by rotation of the clamp member 76 in one direction. Rotation of the clamp member in the opposite direction removes the clamping pressure from the cover to permit separation of the container 32 from the bridge 64 and reattachment of the container to the bridge by rotation of the container relative to the bridge, as explained earlier. The clamp member has a radial handle or finger piece 90 for turning the member between these clamping and releasing positions.

Suction tube 48 extends rotatably through a central bearing bore 92 in the clamp member 76. Welded or otherwise rigidly joined to the tube below the lower clamp member nut 84 is a collar 94. A washer 96 is positioned on the tube between this collar and nut. A collar 98 is welded or otherwise rigidly joined to the suction tube 48 above the upper clamp member shoulder 78. Thus, the cover 44, bridge 64 and clamp member;

76 are all captivated between the suction tube collars 94, 98. However, the tube is free to turn relative to the cover, bridge, clamp member, and container 32. It will be understood, therefore, that when the parts are assembled as in FIG. 5, and the cover 44 is clamped to the container 32, the container may be rotated relative to the suction tube 48 and the spray gun 12 fixed to the upper tube end. The cover 44, bridge 64, and clamp member 76 all rotate in unison with the container.

A releasable latch 100 (FIGS. 2-4) is provided for releasably locking the container 32 in its position of FIG. 1, wherein the handle 90 of the clamp member 76 extends away from the spray gun hand grip 18 so as to not interfere with holding the gun. This latch comprises a wire latch member 102 which is pivoted between its ends on a stud or pivot pin 104 extending from one side of the upper suction tube 98. One end of latch member 102 extends toward the spray gun handle 18 and is bent, as shown, to form a finger piece or handle 106. The opposite end of the latch member is bent to form a latch detent or arm 108 which is engageable in grooves 110, 112 in the upper clamp member shoulder 78 and suction tube collar 98 when the parts are in the positions shown. The latch member 102 is biased to this position by a spring 114 connected to the spray head 12.

It will now be understood that when in its position of FIG. 3, the latch arm 108 of the latch member 102 engages on the aligned latch grooves 110, 112 to lock the container 32 in its position of FIG. 1. Depression of the latch handle 106, as shown in FIG. 4, rotates the latch arm 108 from the latch groove 110 to release the container 32 for rotation. It will be observed that the latch member 102, when released, serves also as an indexing means which automatically engages when the container is rotated to its position of FIG. 1.

Suction tube 48 is a relatively rigid metal tube or the like. The lower end of this tube curves toward the container side wall 36, as shown in FIG. 5. As noted earlier, a stirrer 52 is secured to the tube within the container 32. The stirrer shown is a resiliently flexible plastic or metal vane or paddle reinforced by a vertical spring strip 116 and an upper horizontal mounting strip 118 along the upper paddle edge. This mounting strip is welded or otherwise rigidly joined to the suction tube 18 in such a way that the paddle 52 has a vertical edge wiping contact with the container side wall 36 and its lower edge in wiping contact with the container bottom wall 38.

In use, the container cover clamping member 76 is rotated to its released position and the container 32 is removed for filling with the substance 34, in this instance paint, to be sprayed. The container is then replaced and locked in position with the cover 44 clamped to the container. The spray gun may then be operated to spray the paint or other substance by depression of its trigger 30.

Periodically during the spraying operation, the latch is released and the container 32 is rotated by hand. This container rotation causes relative rotational motion of the paddle 52 through the container contents 34 to stir or agitate the same. The container is rotated in the direction of the arrows in FIGS. 1 and 6 to cause flexing of the paddle away from the suction tube 48, as depicted in FIG. 6, and thereby prevent wedging or binding of the paddle in the container. After each stirring operation, the container is returned to its position of FIG. 1, wherein the latch 100 automatically reengages to lock the container in position.

What is claimed as new in support of Letters Patent 1. A container assembly for a spray gun or the like comprising:

a closed container for the substance to be sprayed,

a suction tube extending rotatably through one wall of said container having an outer end outside the container,

a stirrer secured to said tube within said container,

and

exposed means secured to the outer end of said tube whereby said latter means and container may be grasped to effect relative rotation of said container and tube and thereby relative rotation of said stirrer and container.

2. A container assembly according to claim 1 wherein:

said one wall is the top container wall, and

said stirrer is a paddle having one edge in scraping contact with the bottom container wall and an edge in scraping contact with the container side wall.

3. A container assembly according to claim 1, wherein:

said stirrer is a paddle disposed in scraping contact with one container wall and is flexible so as to yield during relative rotation of said container and suction tube.

4. A container assembly according to claim I wherein:

said container comprises an open container body and a removable cover which closes said body and constitutes said one container wall.

5. The combination according to claim 1 wherein:

said stirrer is a paddle having one edge in scraping Contact with the bottom container wall and an edge in scraping contact with the container side wall.

6. A container assembly according to claim 4 including:

a cover clamping bridge extending over said cover and secured to said container body, and a rotary clamping member between said bridge and cover rotatable between cover clamping and releasing positions, and

said suction tube extends rotatably through said bridge and clamping member.

7. A container assembly according to claim 6 including:

a coupling member on the upper end of said suction tube for coupling said upper tube end to a spray said paddle is flexible and is secured at its upper end only to said suction tube so as to yield during relative rotation of said container and suction tube in one direction.

11. The combination according to claim 5 wherein:

said paddle is flexible and is secured at its upper end only to said suction tube so as to yield during relative rotation of said container and suction tube in one direction.

l2. In combination:

a spray gun,

a closed container for a substance to be sprayed,

means connecting said spray gun and container for passage of said substance from said container to said spray gun including a suction tube extending rotatably through the top wall of said container a stirrer secured to said tube within said container,

and

said container being rotatable relative to said tube and spray gun to effect relative rotation of said container and stirrer for stirring the container contents without removing the container from said spray gun.

13. The combination according to claim 12 including:

means for locking said spray gun and said container against relative rotation.

Patent Citations
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US1841434 *Aug 15, 1929Jan 19, 1932Fanner Mfg CoPaint stirrer
US2035646 *Mar 22, 1932Mar 31, 1936Charles E FarringtonPaint mixer
US2580132 *Mar 14, 1950Dec 25, 1951Edward H SeymourHermetically sealed package for mixing and discharging paint
US3042310 *Nov 23, 1960Jul 3, 1962Reinhold A FrankeHand paint spray gun agitator
US3162338 *Jul 25, 1962Dec 22, 1964Nicholas T GrubelicClosure device for liquid containers such as paint cans
US3412937 *May 20, 1966Nov 26, 1968Binks Mfg CoSpray gun with paint agitator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4596779 *Mar 23, 1983Jun 24, 1986Bellco Glass, Inc.Culture vessel with agitator
US5368388 *Mar 31, 1992Nov 29, 1994Fillon Pichon S.A.Stirrer lid device for a paint pot
US6138875 *Sep 21, 1999Oct 31, 2000Chapin Manufacturing, Inc.Hand-operated foaming apparatus
US6357673Nov 24, 1999Mar 19, 2002Chapin Manufacturing, Inc.Two prong professional sprayer assembly with agitator and filter
US6367663Aug 7, 2000Apr 9, 2002Chapin Manufacturing, Inc.Hand-operated foaming apparatus with interchangeable nozzle
US6837399Sep 27, 2000Jan 4, 20053M Espe AgDynamic mixer
US6945483 *Dec 5, 2001Sep 20, 2005Fanuc Robotics North America, Inc.Electrostatic painting apparatus with paint filling station and method for operating same
US7832923Apr 7, 2007Nov 16, 2010Dynamix Agitators Inc.Mounting assembly for plastic bulk container
US8118478Nov 12, 2010Feb 21, 2012Charles Brian MottMounting assembly for plastic bulk container
US20110089261 *Dec 14, 2010Apr 21, 2011Goehring AlfredSpray gun assembly
EP1541243A1 *Dec 3, 2004Jun 15, 2005Martin RudaSpray gun container with a lockable connecting device
WO2001024919A1 *Sep 27, 2000Apr 12, 2001Espe Dental AgDynamic mixer
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/144, 366/221, 366/605
International ClassificationB01F13/00, B01F7/00, B01F15/00, B05B7/24
Cooperative ClassificationB01F15/00487, B01F15/00538, B05B7/2408, B01F7/00, B01F13/002, Y10S366/605
European ClassificationB01F13/00K2B, B01F15/00L8G, B05B7/24A3A