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Publication numberUS3831948 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1974
Filing dateApr 19, 1973
Priority dateApr 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3831948 A, US 3831948A, US-A-3831948, US3831948 A, US3831948A
InventorsK Suda
Original AssigneeYoshi Ito
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic dice shaking device
US 3831948 A
Abstract
An automatic dice shaking and dispensing device comprises a dice cup fixed to a rotary shaft. A switch in the bottom of the cup is activated by the weight of dice dropped into the cup. The switch activates an electric motor which through gear mechanism drives a crank mechanism and timer at two different speeds. The fast driven crank mechanism agitates the dice cup by repeated camming the dice cup on its rotary shaft against restoring spring tension while the slow turning timer has a cam fixed thereto which eventually cams the dice cup far enough to dispense the dice. Finally, the timer and its cam releases the dice cup which is restored to its upright position by the spring tension and the timer deactivates the electric motor.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Suda [111 3,831,948 Aug. 27, 1974 AUTOMATIC DICE SHAKING DEVICE [75] Inventor: Kataro Suda, Tokyo, Japan [73] Assignee: Yoshi, Ito, Tokyo, Japan [22] Filed: Apr. 19, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 352,636

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Apr. 24,'1972 Japan 47-4838] [52] US. Cl 273/145 R [51] Int. Cl. A63f 9/04 [58] Field of Search 273/145 R, 145 A, 145 B, 273/145 C, 145 CA, 145 D, 145 E, 144 R,

144 A, 144 B, 138 A, 138 R; 46/245, 247,

[56] Reierences Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 397,398 2/1889 Spiegel 194/30 488,328 12/1892 Clawson 194/30 491,971 2/1893 Williams et al. 194/30 1,054,694 3/1913 Langworthy 273/145 A 1,706,465 3/1929 Rosenblatt 273/145 A UX 3,684,291 8/1972 Johmann 273/145 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 46,134 12/1935 France 273/144 A Primary Examiner--Anton O. Oechsle Assistant Examiner-Arn01d W. Kramer Attorney, Agent, or Firn -Wi1liam Anthony Drucker ABSTRACT An automatic dice shaking and dispensing device comprises a dice cup fixed to a rotary shaft. A switch in the bottom of the cup is activated by the weight of dice dropped into the cup. The switch activates an electric motor which through gear mechanism drives a crank mechanism and timer at two different speeds. The fast driven crank mechanism agitates the dice cup by repeated camming the dice cup on its rotary shaft against restoring spring tension while the slow turning timer has a cam fixed thereto which eventually cams the dice cup far enough to dispense the dice. Finally, the timer and its cam releases the dice cup which is restored to its upright position by the spring tension and the timer deactivates the electric motor.

8 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures WIENTED AUBZ 71974 3.831 @948 FIG.5Q

1 AUTOMATIC ica SHAKHNG DEVICE The present invention relates to an automatic disc shaking cup in which a die or dice in a cup is shaken left and right, and then tilted down to cast out the die or dice contained in the cup.

A main object of the invention is to provide a dice shaking cup which is automatically shaken left and right, and casts out the die or dice contained therein without any manual operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide an automatically shaken dice cup which is electrically operated by means of an electric motor for a given period of time, after the die or dice are cast into the cup.

A further object of the invention is to provide an automatically shaken dice cup which makes all kinds of games using a die or dice more amusing.

The objects and features of the invention will be better understood from the following detailed description taken with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the automatic dice shaking cup device according to the invention, partly broken away.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the first embodiment, partly broken away.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the first embodiment.

FIG. 4 is an electrical switching circuit of the first embodiment.

FIGS. 5A to SC show each situation of the cup in the operation of the first embodiment.

FIG. 6 is a front sectional view of the second embodiment of the automatic dice shaking cup device according to the invention, partly broken away.

FIG. 7 is a side view of a part of the second embodiment.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the second embodiment, partly broken away.

FIG. 9 is an electrical switching circuit of the second embodiment.

Referring to the drawings of FIGS. 1 to SC, the first embodiment of an automatic dice shaking cup according to the invention will now be described.

Gear mechanism and crank mechanism are arranged within a frame member 102 fixed on a frame member 101, which are described below. An electric motor 103 is disposed at a bottom of the frame member 101, which motor is operated by an electric power source, for instance, a dry cell. A driving shaft 103' of the motor 103 is attached to a pinion 104. A shaft 106 is rotatably supported in the frame member 102, on which a pinion 107 and a gear 105 are fixed. The gear 105 is engaged with the pinion 104. A crank shaft 110 is rotatably supported in the frame member 102 and an inner frame member 102 and has a gear 108 and a pinion 109 as one body fixed thereon. The gear 108 is engaged with the pinion 107. One end of the crank shaft 110 is projected from the inner frame member 102 and forms a crank 110' engageable with a lever 112 as described below. A sleeve 117 is rotatably disposed concentric on and with respect to the crank shaft 110. A shaft 114 is rotatably supported in the frame member 102 and the inner frame member 102' and a gear 113 and a pinion 115 are fixed thereon. The pinion 115 is engaged with a gear 116 fixed on the sleeve 117. The gear 113 is engaged with the pinion 109.

One end of the sleeve 117 is projected from the frame member 102 and has a cam 119 with a recess 123 fixed thereon. The sleeve 117 fixes a timer 118 which consists of a metal disc 118' and an insulating disc 120 with a smaller diameter than that of the metal disc 118', attached to the metal disc 118 and having a projection 120' on its periphery projecting from the periphery of the metal disc 118". An electric contact plate 121 is fixed on the frame member 102 through an insulator 122 in such a manner that one end of the electric contact plate 121 is in contact with the periphery of the timer 118. A pin 125 is fixed on the inner surface of a lever 124, and is engageable with the cam 119. The lever 124 and the lever 112 are combined as one body by a cross member to form a U-slhaped member which is rotatably supported on the frame member 102 by means of a mounting hole 126. A bend 112' is formed on the lever 112 and can be in contact with the crank 110. Coil springs 127 and 129 are stretched between a part of the inner frame member 102' and a top portion of the lever 112, and a part of the frame member 102 and a top portion of the lever 124, respectively, so that the levers 112 and 124 are tensioned oppositely to each other. A bracket 125 is formed on the top portion of the lever 124 to hook one end of the coil spring 129. A curved engaging hole 128 is formed in the upper portion of the lever 124, into which a pin 130' fits, as described below. A rotary shaft 131 is fixed on an attachment 132 of a cup 130, which is rotatably supported at holes 131', 131' of triangular bearing members 102", 102" formed on the frame members 102 and 102'. The pin 130' also is attached to the attachment 132 and is designed to be engaged with the curved engaging hole 128 for the shaking of the cup 130.

A metal ring 133 is attached to the side of the attachment 132. A contact electrode 135 is fixed on the frame member 102 through an insulating plate 134 in such a manner that it is in contact with the metal ring 133. A mounting disc 138 is moveably supported by a supporting axis 136 and a coil spring 137 in the bottom portion of the cup 130. An electrode 139 is attached to the back side of the mounting disc 138. A stationary electrode is fixed opposite to the electrode 139 at the bottom of the cup 130. When a die or dice are cast into the cup 130, the electrodes 139, 140 come into contact with each other. The electrodes 139 and 140 are electrically connected to the rotary shaft 131 and the metal ring 133, respectively. Reference numeral 141 represents a dry cell, shown in FIG. 2.

Referring to FIG. 4, one terminal of the motor 103 is connected to one terminal of the dry cell 141, and another terminal of the motor 103 is connected to the electric contact plate 121 for the timer 118 and the electrode 139 in the cup 130. Another terminal of the dry cell 141 is connected to the metal disc 118 of the timer 118 and the electrode 140. Thus, the electrodes 139 and 140 form a switching means for the starting of the motor 103.

The operation of the first embodiment as described above, is as follows:

When a die or dice are cast into the cup 130, the mounting disc 138 sinks somewhat so as to bring the electrode 139 fixed at the back side of the mounting disc 138 into contact with the electrode 140 fixed at the bottom of the cup 130. Consequently, since the dry cell 141 is connected to both tenninals of the motor 103, the motor 103 immediately starts to rotate. The

rotation of the motor 103 is transmitted to the gear 108 through the pinion 104, the gear 105 and the pinion 107 to rotate the crank shaft 110 at relatively high speed. Since the pinion 109 is engaged with the gear 113, the shaft 114 rotates. The rotation of the shaft 114 is transmitted to the sleeve 117 through the pinion 115 and the gear 116. The sleeve 117 rotates at a lower speed than the crank shaft 110.

Before the gear 116 starts to rotate, the insulating projecting 120 of the timer 118 fixed on the sleeve 117 lifts up the corresponding electrode 121 so that the corresponding connection between both terminals of the motor 103 is broken there. With the start of the rotation of the gear 116 due to the actuating of the switching means in the cup 130, the metal disc 118' and the insulating disc 120 of the timer 118 start to rotate, and so the electrode 121 comes into contact with the metal disc 118. Consequently the motor 103 continues to rotate in the self-holding.

On the other hand, the crank 110' of the crank shaft 110 which rotates at a higher speed than the timer 118, collides with the bend 112' of the lever 112 every revolution to rotate the lever 112 clockwise around the hole 126. The springs 127, 129 work to restore the lever 112 anticlockwise back around the hole 126. Thus, with the rotation of the crank shaft 110, the crank 110' intermittently strikes the bend 112' to swing right and left the lever 112 as well as the lever 124 combined with the lever 112 as one body.

The pin 130 is slideably engaged with the curved engaging hole 128 of the lever 124, and therefore it is moved up and down along the curved engaging hole 128 with the left and right swinging motion of the lever 124. Thus, the pin 130 swings left and right around the rotary shaft 131 and also the cup 130. Thus, the cup 130 swings left and right, or is shaken left and right with the swing motion of the lever 124.

While the cup 130 is shaken as mentioned above, the sleeve 117 and therefore the cam 119 fixed at the top of the sleeve 117 rotate at the lower speed, as shown in FIG. a. When the recess 123 of the cam 119 comes to an upper position, as shown in FIG. 58, it is engaged with the pin 125 fixed at the innerside of the lever 124, whereby the lever 124 is regulated to be tilted greatly to one side without the swing motion. At that time, the crank shaft 110 rotates idle. Thus, the cup 130 is tilted greatly to one side, as shown in FIG. SC, to cast out the die or dice contained therein. In the further rotation of the cam 119, the pin 125 is released from the recess 123 after the die or dice has been cast out. At that time, the timer 118 performs just one revolution, and the projection 120' lifts up the electrode 121 to break the electrical connection between the electrode 121 and the metal disc 118' of the timer 118. Thus, the motor 103 stops to put the cup 130 into the stationary state.

One cycle of the operation is performed in the abovementioned manner. Next, referring to FIG. 6 to FIG. 9, the second embodiment of the invention will be described.

A cup 202 is disposed at an upper position of a base member 201. A rotary shaft 203 is disposed at a lower position and has a gear 204 fixed thereon. The gear 204 is engaged with a rack 206 formed on an upper portion of a hook-shaped lever 205 pivoted at its lower portion on the base member 201. A coil spring 208 is stretched between a part of the base member 201 and one end portion of the lever 205 to tension the lever 205 clockwise. A sliding surface 205 with which a crank 209 of a crank shaft 225 is in contact, is formed on a recess portion of the lever 205, and a projection 205" with which a cam 210 is engageable, is formed on a center portion of the lever 205. The cam 210 is fixed at one end of a main shaft 211, with which a disc 212 is combined as one body. The disc 212 is provided with a curved bend 212'. The cam 210, the disc with the curved bend 212 and the crank shaft 225 are interconnected through a gear mechanism, as mentioned below. A motor 213 is arranged under the base member 201 as a drive source. A rotary shaft 216 is driven by a pinion 214 fixed to the motor 213 and a gear 217 is engaged with the pinion 214 on which a pinion 215 is fixed. The pinion 215 is engaged with a gear 218 supported rotatably on the main shaft 211. A pinion 219 is combined with the gear 218 as one body. The pinion 219 is engaged with a gear 222 fixed on a shaft 220 which is driven at a reduced speed. A pinion 221 is fixed on the shaft 220 on which a coil spring 223 is stretched between one end of the pinion 221 and the frame member 201 in such a manner that the shaft 220 can move in the axial direction. When a top end 220' of the shaft 220 rides on a curved bend 212 of the disc 212, the shaft 220 is moved right hand against the coil spring 223 so that the pinion 224 fixed on the crank shaft 225 is released from the engagement with the gear 222. The crank shaft 225 rotates only when the pinion 224 is engaged with the gear 222. The main shaft 211 is driven by the motor 213 through the pinion 214, the gear 217, the pinion 215, the gear 218, the pinion 219, the gear 222, the pinion 221 and the gear 226. A metal cylinder 227 is combined with the gear 226 as one body on the shaft 211, on which a timer 228 is fixed. The timer 228 consists of a metal disc 229 electrically connected to the main shaft 211 and the frame member 201, and an insulating disc 230 with a somewhat smaller diameter than that of the metal disc 229, fixed on the metal disc 229. A projection 230' is formed on the periphery of the insulating disc 230, projecting from the periphery of the metal disc 229. An electrode 231 is disposed so as to be in contact with the periphery of the timer 228. When the electrode 231 is lifted up on the projection 230, the electrical connection between the metal disc 229 and the electrode 231 is broken.

FIG. 4 shows the driving circuit of the motor 213 including the electrode 231. One terminal of the motor 213 is connected to one terminal of a dry cell 232 with another terminal of which is connected to the frame member 201. Another terminal of the motor 213 is connected to a starting switch 236, 237 which is disposed in the cup 202. A mounting disc 235 is supported by a supporting axis 234 and a coil spring 233 wound around the supporting axis 234 in such a manner that it can move in a vertical direction. An electrode 236 is fixed on the back side of the mounting disc 235 and a stationary contact 237 is fixed on a bottom of the cup 202. The stationary contact 237 is electrically connected to the rotary shaft 203 and then one terminal of the dry cell 232. The electrode 236 is electrically connected to a metal ring 239 fixed on an insulating attachment of the cup 202 through a lead line 236. A plate contact 240 is fixed at a part of the base member 201 through an insulating plate 241 so as to be in contact with the metal ring 239. The plate contact 240 is electrically connected to one terminal of the motor 213. The electrode 236 and the stationary contact 237 form the starting switch of the motor 213 which is closed when the die or dice are cast into the cup 202. The timer 228 is connected with the starting switch 236, 237 in parallel to self-hold the driving of the motor 213 for a given period of time.

The embodiment of the invention as described above, is operated as the following:

When the die or dice are cast into the cup 202, the mounting disc 235 is moved downward by the weight of the die or dice to bring the electrode 236 fixed on the back side of the mounting disc 235 into contact with the stationary contact 237. Consequently the motor 213 is connected to the electric power source to start. Before the starting of the motor 213, the projection 230 of the timer 228 lifts up the electrode 231 so that the electric connection is broken there. The rotation of the motor 213 is transmitted to the main shaft 211 through the pinion 214, the gear 217, the pinion 215, the gear 218, the pinion 219, the gear 222, the pinion 221 and the gear 226 at a reduced speed. The electrode 231 lifted up by the projection 230 comes into contact with the metal disc 229 with the rotation of the main shaft 211, whereby the motor 213 continues to rotate in the self-holding. The crank shaft 225 is driven by the engagement of the pinion 224 with the gear 222. The crank 209 of the crank shaft 225 collides with the sliding surface 205 of the lever 205 every revolution. Since the lever 205 is pivoted at the pin 207, the lever 205 is rotated anticlockwise everytime the crank 209 collides with the sliding surface 205' of the lever 205. On the other hand, the lever 205 isclockwise tensioned by the spring 208, and therefore the lever 205 is shaken left and right with the rotation of the crank shaft 225. The gear 204 engaged with the rack 206 formed on the upper portion of the lever 205 is rotated anti-clockwise and clockwise with the swing motion of the lever 205 around the pin 207. While the crank 209 is engaged with the sliding surface 205', the gear 204 is rotated clockwise. When the crank 209 is released from the sliding surface 205', the lever 205 is rapidly drawn back by the spring 208 so that the gear 204 is rotated anticlockwise. Thus, the cup 202 is shaken left and right, or is swung with the swing motion of the lever 205. On the other hand, the timer 228 fixed on the main shaft 211 is rotated at a lower speed than the crank shaft 225. And the cam 210 and the disc with the curved bend 212 fixed on the main shaft 211 are rotated at the same speed as the timer 228. The cam 210 is rotated clockwise in FIG. 7 and meanwhile pushes up the projection 205" of the lever 205 from the downward position. When the projection 205" of the lever 205 is pushed up by the cam 210, the gear 204 is rotated on a larger angle, over about 45, by the rack 206 formed on the upper end of the lever 205, whereby the cup 202 is tilted greatly clockwise or right hand in FIG. 7 to cast out the die or dice. Immediately after the tilting of the cup 202, the projection 205" of the lever 205 is rapidly released from the cam 210 and the lever 205 is rapidly rotated clockwise by the spring 208 to put the cup 202 into the original stationary state. On the other hand, the top end 220' of the shaft 220 in contact with the margin of the disc with the curved bend 212' rides up on the curved bend 212 with the rotation of the disc 212 to be pushed in a right hand direction in FIG. 8, so that the pinion 224 fixed on the crank shaft 225 is released from the engagement of the gear 222 to stop the rotation of the crank shaft 225. Thus, the lever 205 is returned exactly to the original position by the spring 208. After the cup 202 is put into the stationary state, the disc with the curved bend 212 moreover rotates to release the top end 220 from the engagement of the curved bend 212. Therefore, the pinion 224 again is engaged with the gear 222 by the function of the spring 223. In the above mentioned operations, the timer 228 rotates exactly once so that the projection 230' lifts up the electrode 231 to stop the self-holding of the motor 213 and therefore stop the rotation of the motor 213.

Although the invention has been particularly shown and described, it is contemplated that various changes and modification may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An automatically shaken dice cup comprising an upright cup, a rotary shaft on a frame fixed to said cup, an electric motor, a switching means for energizing said electric motor on the casting of a die or dice into said cup, said switching means being arranged in said cup, a pin fixed on said cup, a pivoted U-shaped lever on said frame centrally tensioned by springs, a crank shaft, one arm of said Ushaped lever being engaged with said pin, another arm of said U-shaped lever coming into and out of contact with the crank portion of said crank shaft when said crank shaft is rotated, a sleeve on said crank shaft concentric with and rotatable with respect to said crank shaft, a cam fixed at one end of said sleeve and having a peripheral recess, an engaging pin fixed on said one arm of said U-shaped lever, said engaging pin engageable with said recess of said cam to considerably tilt said cup when said sleeve is rotated, a timer means capable of self-holding the electrical connection of said electric motor to an electric source for a given period of time, controlled by a contact disc on said sleeve, said frame supporting a plurality of gear mechanisms connecting a shaft on said electric motor to said crank shaft and said crank shaft to said sleeve, whereby said cup on the dropping of dice therein is shaken left and right on its rotary shaft by the crank portion of the crank shaft repeatedly pivoting the U-shaped lever against the tension of the springs and so said pin fixed on said cup for a given period of time, then tilted.

greatly by said recess of the cam engaging said engaging pin to cast out the die or dice and returned to the original upright position and the motor deenergized.

2. An automatically shaken dice cup according to claim 1 wherein said switching means comprises an electrode fixed on the back side of a mounting disc moveably supported by a supporting axis and a coil spring, and a stationary contact fixed on the bottom of said cup.

3. An automatically shaken dice cup according to claim 1 wherein said timer consists of a metal disc and an insulating disc with a somewhat smaller diameter than that of said metal disc, and a projection on the periphery of said insulating disc, projecting from the pe riphery of said metal disc, said disc and projection in contact with a resilient electric contact plate.

4. An automatically shaken dice cup according to claim 1 wherein said electric source is a dry cell.

5. An automatically shaken dice cup according to claim 1 wherein said contact disc controls an electrode 6. An automatically shaken dice cup according to claim 1 wherein said crank shaft is rotated at a higher speed than the said rotatable sleeve by means of said gear mechanisms.

7. An automatically shaken dice cup comprising a base frame member supporting a cup, a rotary shaft fixed to said cup, an electric motor, a switching means for energizing said electric motor upon the casting of the die or dice into said cup, said switching means being arranged in said cup, a crank shaft, a pinion fixed on said rotary shaft, a hook-shaped lever pivoted at a part of said base member, a spring being connected to a part of said hook-shaped lever and another part of said base member, a rack formed on an upper portion of said hook-shaped lever, said pinion being engaged with said rack, a main shaft, a timer fixed at one end of said main shaft, a cam fixed at the other end of said main shaft, a disc with a raised curved bend portion on the side thereof combined with said cam as one body on said main shaft, another shaft parallel to said main shaft supported slideably in the axial direction thereof, one end of said another shaft being in contact with the side of said disc with said raised curved bend portion of said disc axially sliding said another shaft when said disc rotates, a coil spring wound around said anothershaft between a pinion fixed on said another shaft and a part of said base member to press said one end of said another shaft against the side of said disc, said timer being capable of self-holding the electrical connection of said electrical motor to an electric source for a given period of time, said hook-shaped lever having a sliding surface coming into contact with a crank portion of said crank shaft and a projection engagable with said cam, gear mechanism means interconnecting said crank shaft, said another shaft and said main shaft with a shaft of the electric motor for different rotational speeds of said shafts, whereby on dice being inserted into said cup said cup is shaken left and right by said crank portion of said crank shaft for a given period of time, then tilted considerably by said cam camming said hooked shaped lever to cast out the die or dice and recovered to its original position and said motor deenergized.

8. An automatically shaken dice cup according to claim 7 wherein said crank shaft is rotated at a higher speed than said main shaft by means of said gear mechanism means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US397398 *Feb 16, 1883Feb 5, 1889Pattersongl spiegel
US488328 *Aug 16, 1890Dec 20, 1892 Coin-controlled dice-thrower
US491971 *Dec 26, 1889Feb 14, 1893Said WilliamsCoin controlled dice throwing machine
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US1706465 *Jun 20, 1925Mar 26, 1929John F MeyerCoin-controlled apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7361090 *Sep 12, 2005Apr 22, 2008Jumbo Technology Co., Ltd.Method of automatically and fairly playing a die game and machine for the same
US7744087 *Oct 14, 2008Jun 29, 2010Tzu-Hsiang TsengAutomatic dice shaking apparatus
US7744088 *Oct 14, 2008Jun 29, 2010Tzu-Hsiang TsengAutomatic dice shaking method
US7775522 *Dec 2, 2008Aug 17, 2010Tzu-Hsiang TsengAutomatic dice shaking system
US20140021681 *Jul 18, 2012Jan 23, 2014Andrew Martin RothfuszDice structure with elevating legs disposed atop a playing surface
USRE44439 *Jan 6, 2000Aug 13, 2013Yacob RafaeliGambling game system and method for remotely-located players
CN1981904BDec 14, 2005Jun 16, 2010鋊达有限公司Automatic dice throwing method
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/145.00R
International ClassificationA63F9/04, A63F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0406
European ClassificationA63F9/04B