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Publication numberUS3832737 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1974
Filing dateApr 25, 1973
Priority dateApr 25, 1973
Publication numberUS 3832737 A, US 3832737A, US-A-3832737, US3832737 A, US3832737A
InventorsPodolsky L
Original AssigneePodolsky L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shirt collar having a drainage channel
US 3832737 A
Abstract
A shirt collar comprising superposed fabric layers stitched together along their edges, and a channel at an edge of the collar adjacent to one or each collar point through which water and dirt between the fabric layers can flow out freely from between the fabric layers when the shirt is hung to dry. The channel may be defined by a discontinuity in the stitching along the edge of the collar, by a short tube incorporated in the edge of the collar, or by a perforated tubular collar stay.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Podosky [4 1 Sept. 3, 1974 SHIRT COLLAR HAVING A DRAINAGE CHANNEL 3,430,264 3/1969 Beukenkamp, Jr. 2/141 R Primary Examiner-James R. Boler Attorney, Agent, or FirmBreitenfeld & Levine [57] ABSTRACT A shirt collar comprising superposed fabric layers stitched together along their edges, and a channel at an edge of the collar adjacent to one or each collar point through which water and dirt between the fabric layers can flow out freely from between the fabric layers when the shirt is hung to dry. The channel may be defined by a discontinuity in the stitching along the edge of the collar, by a short tube incorporated in the edge of the collar, or by a perforated tubular collar stay.

6 Claims, 7 Drawing SHIRT COLLAR HAVING A DRAINAGE CHANNEL This invention relates to shirt collars, and more particularly to shirt collars for use with so-called wash and drip dry shirts.

Such shirts are generally made of polyester fiber or a combination of polyester and cotton fibers, and if hung on a hanger while wet they dry to a wrinkle-free condition.

It has been found that long before such shirts become worn out, dark discolorations appear at the tips of the collar making the collar so unsightly that the shirt cannot be worn further. The discoloration is caused by ari accumulation of particles of insoluble dust, greasy particles, and bits of hair. During the washing process, these elements are washed through the interstices of the fabric into the space between the fabric layers comprising the collar. As water runs down the collar and drips off the collar points, during the drying process, the particles are carried by the water to the interior of the collar points and are trapped there.

It is an object of the present invention to overcome this problem by providing a drainage path at or near each collar point through which water and particles between the fabric layers of the collar are free to flow out of the space between the collar layers.

It is a further object of the invention to provide such drainage paths in shirt collars without increasing their cost of manufacture, or at the most increasing the cost by an insignificant amount.

Additional objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following description in which reference is made to the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front view of a shirt collar and part of a shirt to which it is attached;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of one end of a shirt collar formed according to the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing another alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a collar stay, according to the present invention, employed in the embodiment of FIG. 5; and

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 77 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 1 illustrates a shirt 10 having a collar 11, the edges of the collar converging toward collar points 12.

As illustrated in FIG. 2, a typical collar may be formed of two superposed layers of fabric 13 and 14 initially joined along their edges by stitching 15. After the sewing of stitching 15 has been completed, the fabric layers 13 and 14 are reversed so that the seam defined by stitching 15 is inside the collar, as are the margins 16 and 17 of the fabric layers. Thereafter, another sewing operation provides stitching 18 along a line spaced a short distance from the edge of the collar.

As the shirt 10 is washed, water is washed through the fabric layers 13 and 14 into the space 21 between the layers. The washwater carries with it particles of dirt and pieces of hair. As the shirt drip dries, water flows downwardly through space 21 toward the collar points 12. Although the water is free to pass through the fabric and stitching, the dirt and hair 22 are trapped by the stitching 18 and portions of the fabric layers 13 and 14 defining the collar points. In time, enough dirt accumulates to darken the collar points.

FIG. 3 shows a portion of a shirt collar 11a made according to the present invention. The stitching 18 along the edges of the collar is made discontinuous so as to define a space 23, between the ends of the converging lines of stitching, adjacent to the collar point 12. The stitching 15 will also be eliminated in the space 23, and preferably the margins 16 and 17 are also eliminated in the space 23. As a result, an open channel or drainage path 24 is provided through which the space 21 between the fabric layers of the collar communicates with the exterior of the collar.

When a shirt having a collar as illustrated in FIG. 3 is hung to dry, water-carried dirt particles in the space 21 flow downwardly, and when they reach the collar point 12, they are free to flow out of channel 24 along with the water. As a result, the accumulation of dirt particles at the collar point 12 is eliminated.

The shirt collar of FIG. 4 is identical to the one shown in FIG. 3, except that in the space 23 between the layers 13 and 14 a short tube 27 is provided. Tube 27 is open at both ends and defines the channel through which water and dirt in the space 21 can flow out from that space. Tube 27 is rigid in the sense that it is substantial enough to retain its shape, which may be flattened or eliptical in cross-section. The tube may be formed of a suitable metal or plastic. In FIG. 4 tube 27 is shown held in place by friction, i.e., it simply fits tightly between the layers 13 and 14 and the ends of lines of stitching 18. However, in the alternative, stitching 18 could go right through tube 27 so that it is held in place by a number of such stitches. While such stitches would extend across the flow passage through the tube, they would not block the flow passage sufficiently to prevent the dirt particles from passing through the tube. It is contemplated that tube 27 may be formed of a thin plastic rigid enough to maintain its shape but which can be pierced by the needle of a sewing machine to effect its attachment to the collar. Altematively, the tube may be furnished with holes in its wall through which stitches can pass, or it can be cemented in place with a suitable adhesive.

Shirt collar of FIG. 5 represents another embodiment of the present invention. According to this embodiment, a collar stay 29 of special character is arranged between the fabric layers 13 and 14, the stay being shown more clearly in FIGS. 6 and 7. Stay 29 is a flattened tubular element open at both ends and provided with perforations 30 in its walls. One end 31 of the stay 29 is arranged at the point 12 of the collar, the layers 13 and 14 being unattached at the point so that end 31 communicates with the exterior of the collar. Stay 29 may be formed of material as described above with respect to tube 27, and may be held in place by stitching 18 passing through it, or in any other suitable manner. It will be appreciated that water and dirt particles flowing toward point 12 will flow through perforations 30 into the interior of stay 29 and out through the end 31 of the stay.

The invention has been shown and described in preferred fon'n only, and by way of example, and many variations may be made in the invention which will still be comprised within its spirit. It is understood, therefore, that the invention is not limited to any specific form or embodiment except insofar as such limitations are included in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A shirt collar comprising at least two superposed layers of water-permeable fabric secured together along their edges by stitching; the edges of said fabric layers converging to define points of the collar; said stitching extending along paths which converge at each collar point; and a channel at an edge of said collar, contiguous with the point of intersection of the paths along which said stitching extends, through which water and water-carried particles between said fabric layers can flow out freely from between said layers.

2. A shirt collar as defined in claim 1 including one of said channels adjacent to each point of the collar.

3. A shirt collar as defined in claim 1 wherein said channel is defined by a discontinuity in said stitching leaving said layers unattached for a short distance along their edges.

4. A shirt collar comprising at least two superposed layers of water-permeable fabric secured together along their edges by stitching, the edges of said fabric layers converging to define points of the collar, and a channel at an edge of said collar adjacent to one of its points through which water and water-carried particles between said fabric layers can flow out freely from between said layers, said channel comprising a rigid tube between said fabric layers, one end of said tube lying along an edge of the collar.

5. A shirt collar comprising at least two superposed layers of water-permeable fabric secured together along their edges by stitching, the edges of said fabric layers converging to define points of the collar, and a channel at an edge of said collar adjacent to one of its points through which water and water-carried particles between said fabric layers can flow out freely from between said layers, said channel comprising a collar stay between said fabric layers, one end of said stay extending to a point of the collar, said stay being a rigid tube.

6. A shirt collar as defined in claim 5 wherein the wall of said tube is perforated to permit water to flow into said tube.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1097101 *Mar 21, 1913May 19, 1914August KolbNegligée shirt.
US1400339 *Mar 4, 1918Dec 13, 1921Cluett Peabody & Co IncSoft fold-collar
US3259915 *Oct 21, 1964Jul 12, 1966Dison Stanley WDouble sock
US3430264 *May 6, 1966Mar 4, 1969Beukenkamp Cornelius JrCollar having a tube-like construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6708344Jan 29, 2002Mar 23, 2004Marc FriedmanKnitted shirt collar with plastic stays
US6862743Sep 6, 2002Mar 8, 2005Marc FriedmanKnitted collar with stays and method of manufacturing such a collar
US7051376Jan 25, 2005May 30, 2006Marc FriedmanKnitted collar with stays and method of manufacturing such a collar
US7578034 *May 19, 2003Aug 25, 2009Bg & Sons, LlcCollar stay punch, storage device and method
US8220075 *Mar 10, 2010Jul 17, 2012Viicii LlcMulti-tool collar stay
US9003566 *Aug 22, 2013Apr 14, 2015Allan WeissAdjustable collar stay for a shirt collar
US20110219515 *Mar 10, 2010Sep 15, 2011Viicii LlcMulti-tool collar stay
USRE39095Dec 31, 2002May 16, 2006Marc FriedmanKnitwear having no curl collars
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/132
International ClassificationA41B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41B3/00
European ClassificationA41B3/00