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Publication numberUS3833300 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1974
Filing dateMay 14, 1973
Priority dateMay 14, 1973
Publication numberUS 3833300 A, US 3833300A, US-A-3833300, US3833300 A, US3833300A
InventorsW Rymes
Original AssigneeUs Navy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Three {37 d{38 {11 weapons sight
US 3833300 A
Abstract
An improved sighting device for projectile launchers that are mounted on a moving vehicle includes a dual parabolic visor slidably positioned on a helmet. The visor is in the form of two parabolas; and when locked in position, one parabola is in front of each eye of the wearer. The focal point of each parabola is at a prescribed point on the upper leading edge of the helmet opening. Fiber optic bundles, located at each focal point are connected to cathode-ray tubes and project a series of dots on to the visor in front of each eye of the wearer to simulate, in three dimensions, the trajectory of a projectile, if the projectile were fired at any given time.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ilnited tates atent r 91 Rymes @ept. 3, 1974 THREE D WEAPONS SIGHT Primary Examiner-John K. Corbin [75] Inventor. William H. Rymes, Arlington, Va. Assistant Examiner p L. Evans [73] Assignee: The United States O m c as Attorney, Agent, or FirmR. S. Sciascia; P. Schneider;

represented by the Secretary of the R, Rothman Navy, Washington, DC. [22] Filed: May 14, 1973 [57] ABSTRACT [21] Appl. No.: 360,282 An improved sighting device for projectile launchers that are mounted on a moving vehicle includes a dual parabolic visor slidably positioned on a helmet. The [52] 2/10 350/96 visor is in the form of two parabolas; and when locked 51 I U 5 0 5 in position, one parabola is in front of each eye of the 8] Kit. G b 2 Wearer The fQCaI point of each parabola is at a p [5 1 Field of Search 23/1O235O/96 scribed point on the upper leading edge of the helmet 50/ 35 /247 13 opening. Fiber optic bundles, located at each focal point are connected to cathode-ray tubes and project [56] References C'ted a series of dots on to the visor in front of each eye of UNITED STATES PATENTS the wearer to simulate, in three dimensions, the trajec- 3,059,519 10/1962 Stanton 350/298 X tory of a projectile, if the projectile were tired at any 3,205,303 9/1965 Bradley 350/298 X given time. 3,633,988 1/1972 Farrar 356/247 X 3,787,109 1/1974 Vizenor 350/298 x 9 Claims, 3 Drawlng Flgures I 8 I 3\ i6 20 2 CRT THREE D WEAPONS SIGHT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to aiming systems and especially to an improved sight for projectile launchers.

The ability of an observer to appreciate distance and the three-dimensional properties of objects depends upon a phenomenon known as stereoscopic vision. Stereoscopic vision is physiological in origin and depends on the brain to fuse two images, formed on the individual retinas of a persons eyes. The two eyes view an object from slightly different angles, and the two images are combined in the brain to give a sensation of shape or form and a capability to resolve differences in range or spacing.

At present there are two primary ways of determining the correct point in time to fire guns, rockets, or high velocity projectiles. The first is by means of a servoed sight; and the second is by means of a simulated bullet, projectile or rocket path as displayed on a headup, seethrough sight. Both systems are limited to lead angle only and depend on either range bars or radar tracking for firing range criteria. Certain drawbacks are associated with these systems such as the necessity to have prior knowledge of target size to set the range bars, the settling time of the radar, and the settling time of a servoed sight.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention eliminates the need to have prior knowledge of target size, settling time of the radar, and settling time of a servoed sight, by projecting a series of dots on to the visor of a helmet in front of each eye of the wearer to simulate in three dimensions the trajectory of a projectile at any instantaneous firing. A computer system of known design calculates and controls the projection of the dots. The wearer will perceive a line or series of dots, because of his stereoscopic vision, that appears to extend out in front of his launcher. The system may also be employed to properly align radar or other sensing devices.

An object of the present invention is to provide firing criteria for guns and launch criteria for missiles, rockets, and high velocity projectiles.

Another object is to provide a method of positioning radar antennas for early target acquisition and other sensors of various types.

Other objects, advantages, and novel features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the invention when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic of a helmet employing the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a schematic of a top of the helmet depicting the shape of the visor; and

FIG. 3 is a schematic view of the paths projected on the visor in front of each eye.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1, which illustrates a preferred embodiment of the sight, shows a helmet 2 having a visor guard 4 mounted thereon. The visor guard 4 may be connected with any suitable adhesive to the top of the helmet 2 and forms a hollow chamber 6 therewith. Within the chamber 6 is a dual parabolic visor 8 slidably connected to the visor guard 4 by a lock nut it). The lock nut 10 may, for example, pass through a slot (not shown) in visor guard 4. When the nut 10 is loosened, visor 8 may be moved to the position indicated by the broken line in front of the wearers eyes. The lock nut 10 may then be tightened to rigidly position the visor.

The visor 8 is shaped in the form of two parabolas which, when in the position indicated by the broken line, are positioned in front of each eye. The focal point of each parabola is at a prescribed point on the upper leading edge of the helmet opening. A pair of cathode ray tubes 14, only one of which is shown in the side view of FIG. 1, are located at the lower edges of the helmet 2 to lower the center of gravity. A pair of coherent, fiber optic bundles 16, only one of which is shown in FIG. 1, are connected at one of their ends to the cathode-ray tubes 14, and their other ends terminate at the focal points 18 of each parabola defined by the visor 8. The actual shape of the visor 8 can better be seen in FIG. 2, which depicts the two parabolas formed by the visor 8 and the fiber optic bundles 16 each of which have one of their ends located at a focal point of one of the parabolas.

In operation, each cathode-ray tube 14 will project on to the termination of the respective fiber optic bundle 16, a simulated, two-dimensional path that the bullets, rockets projectiles, or sensor beams would follow should they be activated by the wearer at any moment of time. Those paths 22 will be projected from the focal point of each parabola on the visor as shown in FIG. 3 and reflected from the visors surface. The display will be a computer-generated, two-dimensional path and will be a function of platform motion along with the bullets, rockets or projectiles ballistic characteristics or sensor characteristics. To compensate for movement of the wearers head from boresight, sensors 20, connected to the helmet and known in the art, will provide helmet position, so that the display as viewed by the pilot will always coincide with the actual projected path of the projectile or sensor beam. The pilot will perceive a line or series of dots, because of his stereoscopic vision, that appear to extend out in front of his aircraft. He will visualize a stream, not unlike a stream of water from a garden hose, extending out toward the target. When the stream coincides with the target the system is properly aimed for actuation.

On those systems employing missiles the cathode-ray tubes can be selected by logic to display an optimum launch envelope or sighting reticle as the situation demands. As those skilled in the art would recognize, the system as shown has wide flexibility and could also be used to position radar antennas for early target acquisition and sensors of various types. In the case of sensors or radar, the computer would simply use the directional characteristics of the radar or sensor to project a twodimensional, optimum acquisition path on the visor 8.

A reflective coating may be placed on the visor 8 to enhance the reflection of the paths projected from the fiber optic bundles. In addition, the visor may be smoked to cut down on glare. The system may be used with aircraft or other movable projectile launchers or sensor systems.

Obviously many modification and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

l. A sight comprising:

a support;

a dual parabolic visor mounted on the support;

a pair of fiber'optic bundles, each bundle having one end located at a focal point of one of the parabolas defined by the visor; and

a pair of cathode-ray tubes connected to the other ends of the fiber optic bundles for projecting on each part of the dual visor a two-dimensional path representing the flight path of a projectile if it were simultaneously launched, so that a viewer looking through the visor would see the two paths stereoscopically as a single path extending outward from the visor.

2. The sight of claim 1 wherein said support is a helmet and the cathode-ray tubes are mounted on the helmet.

3. The sight of claim 2 wherein said helmet has a visor guard mounted thereon and said visor is slidably connected to said visor guard.

4. The sight of claim 3 wherein said visor is smoked to partially attenuate the light passing therethrough.

5. A method of aiming a weapon system, employing a dual, parabolic visor, comprising the steps of:

projecting on each parabola defined by said visor,

from the focal point of each parabola, a twodimensional path representing the flight path of a projectile if it were instantaneously launched, the two paths when viewed by an observer who is wearing the visor forming a stereoscopic line which appears to extend in front of him;

peering through the visor to determine if the stereoscopic line defined by the projected paths intersects a target; and

adjusting the aim of the weapon system until the stereoscopic line intersects the target.

6. In combination with a weapons system and connected computer for deriving a representative, twodimensional path of a projectile fired instantaneously from the weapons system and a pair of cathode-ray tubes for displaying that path, the improvement comprising:

a helmet a dual parabolic visor mounted on the helmet; and

means for projecting the path displayed on the oathode-ray tubes from the focal point of each parabola defined by said visor on to each parabolic section of said visor.

7. The combination of claim 6 wherein said helmet includes a visor guard and said visor is slidably mounted on said visor guard.

8. The combination of claim 6 wherein said projection means comprises a pair of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having one end located at the focal point of one of said parabolas and the other end connected to one of said cathode-ray tubes.

9. A method of aiming a sensor system, employing a dual parabolic visor, comprising the steps of:

projecting on each parabola defined by said visor,

from the focal point of each parabola, a twodimensional path representing the optimum acquisition path of the sensor, the two paths when viewed by'an observer who is wearing the visor forming a stereoscopic line which appears to extend in front of him;

peering through the visor to determine if the stereoscopic line defined by the projected paths intersects a predetermined area; and

adjusting the orientation of the sensor system until the stereoscopic path intersects the area.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification356/13, 2/10, 89/41.22, 356/247, 359/630, 348/804, 348/53
International ClassificationG02B6/04, G02B27/22, H01J29/89, G02B27/01, G02B27/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01J2229/8903, G02B27/017, G02B2027/0132, G02B27/0172, G02B27/0093, G02B2027/0156, H01J29/89, G02B27/2235
European ClassificationG02B27/01C1, G02B27/22S1, H01J29/89, G02B27/00T