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Publication numberUS3833886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1974
Filing dateMar 24, 1972
Priority dateMar 29, 1971
Also published asDE2156873A1, DE2156873B2, DE2156873C3
Publication numberUS 3833886 A, US 3833886A, US-A-3833886, US3833886 A, US3833886A
InventorsE Baumann
Original AssigneeZellweger Uster Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote control with selective evaluation of impulse patterns
US 3833886 A
Abstract
A receiver programmed to respond to either an individual command impulse pattern or to an individual command and a collective command impulse pattern. This is accomplished by opening two links in the command key so that the receiver is responsive both to the individual command and a collective command. In this state, both received commands would match the impulse pattern associated with the receiver. When these two links are closed, the receiver is only responsive to the individual commands.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1974 United States Patent [1 1 Baumann X XA 4 44 W 54 2300 3 .44 33 x R 4 6 H 0 4 3 Benford Gordan Fenner et o n n mmm ABS 000223 777777 9mm NNNHMW 673635 274205 003472 0 354 ,5 1 333333 m E m V r IR 3 T 3 C T m S R .6 r S U m Hm n m TL n a U a a. WP m t M d L L n 0 Ba a RF fl g T0 e e N M 00 dW 8 Cl ES Z T A v- U m w 0 t. n L n .5 MA 0 EV S RE I A M J H U .1 r

[ Filed: 1972 Primary ExaminerDona1d J. Yusko [21] Appl. No.: 237,835

Attorney, Agent, or FirmKenyon & Kenyon Reilly Carr & Chapin ABSTRACT A receiver programmed to respond to either an indi- [30] Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 29, 1971 Switzerland..... 4608/71 vidual command impulse pattern or to an individual command and a collective command impulse pattern. This is accomplished by opening two links in the com- 0 mm M mmd 6 v u/ ""0 "4 mm ""m Mme mm I. C WM l Umm 111] 2 00 555 [[r...

mand key so that the receiver is responsive both to the [56] References Cited individual command and a collective command. In this UNITED STATES PATENTS state, both received commands would match the impulse pattern associated with the receiver. When these 0 t e V & n O p a r s w m n 0 we .1 .B F r. g e .w m m mm D hn 0o dm .1 em a S .l mm 0 C11. 1 ea m 8 1 nd m e wh t X XX BMMRR 4 74 6WW66 l 11 /44// 03300 4 .44

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REMOTE CONTROL WITH SELECTIVE EVALUATION OF IMPULSE PATTERNS This invention relates to a remote control with selective evaluation of impulse patterns.

Remote control methods and apparatus for carrying out such methods have been known in which master commands as well as individual commands are transmitted and received by suitably equipped receivers. For example, one such method and apparatus is described in Swiss Patent 462,929, published Nov. 15, 1968, in British Patent Application 3769/69 now Patent No. 1,253,733 and in South African Patent 69/0205. As described in these references, each impulse pattern representing either an individual command or a master command consists of an equal number of n elements, each of which can be, for example, an impulse or an impulse gap. Another property of the individual and master commands is that one individual command represents a combination of a freely selected class (m) of the n elements, whilst a master command represents a combination of another class (p) of the n elements. This characterizes the structure of the impulse patterns to be produced at the transmitting end and also determines an essential property of the remote control receiving arrangement. According to the cited references, a receiver which is designed to receive and evaluate an individual command is also equipped to evaluate a master command by virtue of the fact that, during reception, at least one of the n elements of the combination is not tested for consistency between the impulse pattern received and the individual command impulse pattern associated with the receiver.

Although the known remote control method and the associated receiving arrangement referred to above perform the function of forming and evaluating individual and master commands, the difference in class required for the individual commands and the master commands has been a disadvantage so far as susceptibility to interference is concerned.

In order to provide for a clearer understanding of the invention, note is made of the fact that in remote control terminology, the individual commands are formed, for example, by impulse sequences. Impulse sequences of this kind are also known as impulse patterns or impulse telegrams. The individual commands are, for example, in a binary code, and are generally combinations of a certain class of n elements where n denotes the number of stages in an impulse sequence of the kind in question.

Each stage of the impulse pattern is associated with a binary character of a first kind, for example an impulse, or a binary character of a second kind, for example an impulse gap. Instead of impulses and impulse gaps, it is also possible in known manner to use position-modulated impulses or alternating-current impulses of different frequency, and the like for representing commands. The present invention is hereinafter described with refrence to one example with impulses and gaps. However, it is pointed out that the invention is by no means limited to this type of impulse telegram or impulse pattern.

It will be assumed by way of example that an impulse pattern has ten stages, i.e., n 10, thus ten elements are available for forming combinations representative of commands. Under the rules of combinatory analysis,

a total of 252 commands is obtained from 10 elements in combinations of the 5th class.

In remote control technology, since each command generally has a counter command, for example to switch on or off a remote controlled switch, it is of advantage to form 126 pairs of commands from the total of 252 possible combinations. As already known, the evaluation of pairs of commands such as these becomes particularly simple in terms of apparatus where inverse impulse patterns are used for the command and the counter command. Accordingly, it is of advantage to form the 126 pairs referred to above in such a way that each pair consists of impulse patterns that are inverse to one another.

In binary notation, the impulse pattern of a certain command reads, for example, as follows:

The impulse pattern represents a 5th-class combination of 10 elements. It contains the binary value 1 five times and the binary value 0 five times. According to what has been said above, the associated counter command thus has the following impulse pattern:

The commands a and b shall be individual commands. According to Swiss Patent 462,929 referred to above, collective commands (master commands) are formed in such a way that their impulse patterns represent combinations of another class, for example, the 4th class, of n elements. Accordingly, there is a difference in class between the individual commands and the collective commands. A collective command with which a suitably equipped receiver associated with the individual command a, for example, could be covered has an impulse pattern of the following kind for example:

It can be seen that in the collective command (c) the binary value 0 is present in the 4th stage instead of the binary value 1 (in command a). The counter collective command thus has the impulse pattern inverse to command c.

According to the above Swiss patent, a receiver with which the individual command a is associated is made to respond to a collective command c by virtue of the fact that the monitoring for consistency between the impulse pattern received and the impulse pattern associated with the particular receiver, which monitoring is carried out in stages, stops i.e., is interrupted in a certain stage of the impulse pattern. In the present example, monitoring would be interrupted in the 4th stage. In this case, any non-consistency occurring in this 4th stage, as must intentionally occur in the transmission of a collective command 0, does not have any effect upon the operative stage of the circuit element which is in its first set state.

Accordingly, despite the non-consistency which has occurred in the 4th stage, the received impulse pattern 0, on completion thereof, is accepted by the testing means. In other words, the impulse pattern of the selective command c is also selectively evaluated by the receiver which is prepared to receive the individual command a, and the associated command carried out. The same applies analogously as regards the counter collective command with the impulse pattern d inverse to c.

The transmission of remote control signals, especially in cases where they are superimposed upon a power supply system, as is generally the case for example in ripple control, is accompanied by a relatively high noise level. As 4th class combinations of 10 elements, collective commands formed by the method described above represent a preliminary stage of individual commands as 5th class combinations of elements. This can be recognized for example from the fact that, in the event of a sufficiently strong and long-lasting interference impulse during the 4th stage of the transmitted collective command of impulse pattern 0, it could happen that this command becomes converted by the addition of an interference impulse in the 4th stage into an individual command of impulse pattern a. However, such a conversion of a collective command into an individual command is undesirable because it can lead to faulty switching even in receivers which are adjusted solely for the reception of their individual command.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to obviate the possibility that a collective command of one class can be converted into an individual command of another class.

It is another object of the invention to avoid the transmission of a collective command impulse which might represent a preliminary stage for an individual command impulse.

It is another object of the invention to use combinations of the same class of n elements both for individual command and also for collective commands.

It is another object of the invention to enable numerous master commands and individual commands to be formed with greater immunity from interference by comparison with known solutions.

Briefly, the present invention provides a method for remote control by means of impulse patterns associated with individual commands which consist of n stages of which a predetermined number of stages is occupied by binary characters of a first kind (0) whilst a similarly predetermined number of stages is occupied by binary characters of a second kind l The arrangement is such that, during a transmission sequence, an impulse pattern associated with the particular command is transmitted which is tested for consistency with the impulse pattern associated with the particular receiver and, if accepted, is evaluated. The method of the invention is distinguished by the fact that combinations of the same class of the n elements are used at the trans mitting end both for the formation of individual commands and also for the formation of collective commands although a first portion of the possible combinations is used to represent collective commands whilst a second portion of the possible combinations is used for forming individual commands. Further, the method is distinguished by the fact that, at the receiving end, monitoring or checking for consistency between the impulse pattern received and the individual command impulse pattern associated with the receiver stops in at least two of the n stages in the receiver which are designed to respond to collective commands. In addition, at least one binary character of the first type and one binary character of the second type are present in the unmonitored or unchecked stages of the received impulse pattern.

The invention also provides an apparatus comprising at least one circuit element which can be adjusted to two operative stages and a testing means. The circuit element is adjustable into a set, first operative state, and the latest, on commencement of the reception of an impulse pattern. In addition, the circuit element is constructed to retain this operative state up to the end of the impulse pattern if consistency between the impulse pattern received and the impulse pattern associated with the particular receiver is detected by the testing means in the monitored stages of the impulse pattern but which otherwise is displaced into the second state if the impulse patterns are inconsistent.

If, in the previously taken example, n remains equal to 10, all commands are formed as 5th class combinations of 10 elements. Under the rules of combinatory analysis, this gives a total of 252 possible combinations, i.e., commands. Of these 252 combinations, 126 pairs of double commands are initially formed with impulse patterns that are inverse to one another. A first portion of these 126 pairs of commands, for example, 26, is reserved for collective commands, whilst the second portion, covering the remainder, is available for the formation of individual commands.

The ability to respond not only to an individual command but to a collective command as well, which is required for at least some of the multiplicity of receivers connected to a remote control system, is achieved by virtue of the fact that the monitoring for consistency between the impulse pattern received and the individual command impulse pattern associated with the receiver always stops for at least two stages; the stages in question being stages occupied by inverse binary characters. Accordingly, for example, one stage of the associated impulse pattern which is occupied by a binary character of a first type (1) and another stage which is occupied by a binary character of a second type (0) are not tested for consistency.

As required, a collective command intended for the particular receiver differs in impulse pattern from the individual command impulse pattern associated with the particular receiver, for example, in two stages. However, the rest of the two impulse patterns are identical. In the case of different individual commands which can be covered by a common collective command, the position of the identical parts of the associated impulse patterns is different, although in two stages for example, there is never any consistency. As a result of the absence of any examination for consistency in these very stages, for example two in number, these receivers are also made to respond to the aforementioned collective command.

It can readily be seen that, where collective com-' mands and individual commands are formed in this way, there is no longer any danger of a collective command being converted by an interference impulse into an individual command for a receiver that is exclusively adjusted to its individual command. In order to convert one command into another, it would be necessary for an interference impulse to occur in a stage occupied, for example, by an impulse gap, and, in another predetermined stage which is occupied by an impulse from the transmitter, for this impulse to be lost on its way to the receiver. However, this is a condition which would appear to be extremely improbable to be satisfied.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and appended claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates one simple example of an impulse pattern;

FIG. 1a illustrates one example of an impulse pattern of a collective command;

FIG. 2 illustrates a circuit diagram for a first embodiment of a receiver according to the invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates a number of circuit diagrams based on the chronological sequence of a remote control command;

FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective view of a command key;

FIG. 5 illustrates another embodiment of a command set connected to a receiver according to the invention;

FIG. 6 illustrates an electronic reversing switch according to the invention; and

FIG. 7 illustrates another embodiment of a number of command sets connected to a receiver according to the invention.

In the interest of simplicity and understanding, remote control commands with n 4 elements are used in the following.

Referring to FIG. 1, a simple impulse pattern with which a remote control command is transmitted has the time t plotted as the abscissa and, as ordinate, the amplitude U of the alternating current signals which are superimposed upon a power supply system for transmitting the remote control commands. The receivers connected to a common power supply system are started up in known manner by a pilot impulse l. The pilot impulse 1 is followed by an impulse pattern 2 for the period of time T. The period T is divided into n 4 intervals in each of which an impulse or an impulse gap is marked by a remote control transmitter. As shown, the impulse pattern 2 begins in the interval T, with an impulse gap 11 which is followed in the interval T by an impulse 12. This is followed in the next interval T by another impulse gap 13 which in turn is followed in the interval T, by an impulse 14. It is of course also possible to use impulse patterns with more intervals and more complicated sequences of impulse gaps and impulses (cf. U.S. Pat. No. 3,531,174). However, it is also possible to transmit master commands or collective commands (cf. South African Patent 69/0205, Swiss Patent 462,929).

In use, the starting impulse 1 and the impulse pattern 2 are received by the receivers connected to the common power supply system for selective evaluation of the different impulse patterns 2.

Referring to FIG. 2, a receiver suitable for evaluating the impulse pattern of FIG. 1 consists of a basic unit 21, a command set 22 and a command key 23 such a receiver is similar to that described in US. Pat. No. 3,742,455.

The basic unit 21 contains a frequency-selective receiving element 24 of the kind used in ripple control which, on the arrival of a starting impulse 1 (FIG. 1), temporarily closes a switch 25 and, in doing so, connects a synchronous motor 26 to an ac. voltage present between the terminals 27 and 28. As a result, the synchronous motor 26 is started up and closes a switch 29 which remains self-holding in known manner throughout the entire period of evaluation of a remote control command. Immediately before commencement of the impulse pattern 2 (FIG. 1), the synchronous motor 26 briefly actuates an ignition contact 30, as a result of which, a positive voltage is applied by a terminal 31 to a terminal 32 of the basic unit 21. Following reception of the impulse pattern 2 (FIG. 1), the synchronous motor 26 also actuates an interrogation switch 33, as a result of which, a positive voltage present at a terminal 34 is temporarily applied to a terminal 35 of the basic unit 21.

During reception of the impulse pattern 2 (FIG. 1) the receiving element 24 actuates a reversing switch 36 in accordance with the received impulse pattern 2. As a result, the reversing switch 36 applies a positive voltage present at a terminal 37 to a terminal 38, in the case of a received impulse gap, and to a terminal 39 of the basic unit 21 in the case of a received impulse. Advantageously, the reversing switch 36 functions in a non-interrupting manner.

The basic unit 21 further comprises a stepping swtich 40 whose contact finger 41 is connected to a terminal 42 at zero potential. During a period T, the stepping switch 40 covers n switching positions a, b, c, d in that order. The arrangement is such that the switching position a is covered during the time interval T, (cf. FIG. 3), the switching position b is covered during the time interval T the switching position c covered during the time interval T' and the switching positiond covered during the time interval T,,. In this connection, it is of advantage for reasons of tolerance, for the time taken to cover the switching positions to be shorter than the duration of the intervals T, T',,.

In its rest position, the contact finger 41 of the stepping switch 40 does not lie in any of the aforementioned switching positions a d. The terminals 43, 44, 45 and 46 of the basic unit 21 are each temporarily connected during the time intervals T',, T T;, and T, to the zero-potential terminal 42 by the stepping switch 40.

The switching functions which have to be carried out in the basic unit 21 can also be performed by electronic means.

The switching program to be carried out by the basic unit 21 is shown by way of example in FIG. 3 based on the chronological sequence of a transmitted remote control command, i.e., as a function of the starting impulse 1 and the impulse pattern 2. Ina time interval T preceding the impulse pattern 2 or its duration T, the pilot impulse 1 is sent out by the ripple control transmitter and transmitted through the common power supply system to the receiver 20. The starting impulse begins at a moment 1,, (cf. FIG. 3 diagram A). Each of the intervals T T, and another following interval T is divided into 4 subintervals, giving a total of 24 such sub-intervals (cf. FIG. 3, line H).

The receiving element 24 normally responds with a delay to the impulses transmitted and received and, at the end of the impulse, returns to rest advantageously with delay. Accordingly, the switch 25 is still open from I the time t to the time t, during the time interval T (cf. FIG. 3, line B). By contrast, the switch 25 isclosed-by the received starting impulse 1 for the period t,-to t 'in the time interval T At the end of the time interval T' i.e., at the time t the switch 25 opens again. Since an impulse gap 11 is marked in the interval T, in the present impulse pattern 2, the switch 25 remains open during the interval T,. It is only as a result of the impulse l2 transmitted in the interval T that the receiving element 24 responds, again with the usual delay, at the time 13,, and keeps the switch 25 closed up to the time An impulse gap 13 is again marked in the interval T so that the switch remains open throughout the entire interval T' By contrast, the receiving element 24 responds to the impulse 14 transmitted in the inter val T, so that the switch 25 is again closed for the period from to From the time t,,, the switch 25 is again opened. Opening of the switch 25 during the intervals T, and T is inconsequential because the selfholding switch 29 keeps the synchronous motor 26 gomg.

The switch 36 is also controlled by the receiving element 24. The switch 36 changes from position x to position y depending on whether an impulse gap or an impulse is marked in the impulse pattern received (cf. FIG. 3, line C). As already mentioned, it is of advantage for this change to be carried out without interruption so that the switching times actually overlap to a certain extent. As will later be shown, at least one switching element with two operative states accommodated in the command set 22, for example in the form of a controlled silicon rectifier or in the form of a bistable circuit arrangement, is fed through the switch 36. With regard both to the necessary overlap in the switching times of the switch 36 and to any brief interruptions during reversal which are still just permissible, allowance has to be made in this case for the clearing behavior of the particular bistable circuit element in known manner.

Due to the aforementioned closure of the switch 25 on the arrival of a starting impulse, the synchronous motor 26 is started up and brings the switch 29 into a self-holding state. For example from the time t up to the time r (cf. FIG. 3, line D).

The switch 30 which is also actuated by the synchronous motor 26 in accordance with a program fixed in advance, closes before the beginning of the period T, for example during the time interval from to t,,. The switch 30 remains open for the remainder of the sequence of a control command (cf. FIG. 3, line E).

As already mentioned, the stepping switch is also actuated by the synchronous motor 26. The switching function of this stepping switch 40 is graphically illustrated in FIG. 3, line F. As can be seen, the contact finger 41 of the stepping switch 40 covers each of the n switching positions a,b,c,d in that order over a brief period during each of the intervals T, to T For example, the terminal 43 is connected through the contact finger 41 to the zero-potential terminal 42 during the period of time from to t,. This applies to the terminal 44 for the period 1,, to t,,, to the terminal 45 for the period from t to t,,, and to the terminal 46 for the period t,,, 110 t g.

The interrogation switch 33 is permanently open during the starting impulse interval T and during the interval T and is only temporarily closed on completion of the impulse pattern, for example during the period of time from i to t (cf. FIG. 3, line G).

The structure and mode of operation of the command set 22 with the command key 23 will now be described with reference to FIG. 2.

The command set 22 is connected to the terminals 32, 35, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45 and 46 of the basic unit 21. Positive voltage is supplied to a bistable switching element 50, for example in the form of a controllable silicon rectifier (SCR) either from the terminal 38 or from the terminal 39, depending on the position of the switch 36, through a resistor 51 of 52 and a diode 53 or 54. A positive voltage is briefly supplied as a starting voltage to a starting terminal 55 of the controllable silicon rectifier in the period of time to t, (cf. FIG. 3) during which the switch 30 is closed, through a voltage divider with the resistors 56 and 57. As a result, the controlled silicon rectifier 50 is brought into a conductive state providing the rectifier 50 was not previously in this state. Accordingly, the bistable switching element 50 carries current through one of the two feed current circuits S, and S from the terminal 38 or 39 (depending upon the position of the switch 36) either through the resistor 51 and the diode 53 or through the resistor 52 and the diode 54. Accordingly, it has been brought into the first of two states. Absence of current, i.e., a cleared SCR, corresponds to the second state. The cathode of the SCR is connected to the terminal 42 at zero potential.

From the terminal 35 of the basic unit 21, a line 58 leads througn an impulse switch 59 to the input terminal 60 of the bistable switching element 50, i.e., to the anode terminal of the SCR. According to FIG. 3, line G, the interrogation switch 33 is only temporarily closed for the period of time from t to on completion of the impulse pattern 2. During this period, the impulse switch 59 is thus connected on one side to the positive voltage present at terminal 34 and on the other side to the anode of the SCR 50. If then, the SCR is still in the conductive first state, a current impulse flows through the impulse switch 59 so that the SCR 50 switches into a new position until the next current impulse arrives. If by contrast the SCR is already in the cleared state, i.e., currentless second state at the end of the impulse interval 2, no current impulse will flow through the impulse switch 59 despite the temporarily closed interrogation switch 33. Accordingly, the impulse switch 59 retains the position it was last in.

Whether the bistable switching element 50 remains in the first stage at the end of the received impulse pattern or whether it has already been brought into the second state, will be determined by the result of testing of the impulse pattern associated with the receiver 20.

The two impulse patterns are compared during each of the intervals T, to T, by means of the stepping switch 40 in the basic unit and the lines 61, 62, 63 and 64 connected thereto in conjunction with the command key 23 and the connection of the command key 23 to the feed current circuits S, and S The command key 23 through line connections which are formed by the links 65, 66., 67 and 68 and by the conductors 69 and 70, connects either the switching point 71 of the feed current circuit S, or the switching point 72 of the feed current circuit S to the terminal 42 at zero potential in dependence upon the position of the links 68, and in dependence upon the particular position of the stepping switch 40. In those intervals which are not to be monitored, as in the case with collective commands, the corresponding links (65 68) in the command key 63 are arranged in such a way they occupy a central position for example .73 or 74 or 75 or 76.

If, in the present embodiment, the receiver 20 is only intended to respond to an individual command which is characterized by the impulse pattern illustrated in FIG. 1, the links 65 and 67 have to be connected to the conductor 69 because the receiver 20, by virtue of the impulse pattern associated therewith, is only expecting impulse gaps in the associated intervals T, and TM 3. On the other hand, impulses are expected by the receiver 20 in the intervals T and T so that the links 66 and 68 associated with these intervals have to be connected to the conductor 70. The conductor 69 is designed to be connected through a reversing switch 77 either to the switching point 71 of the feed current circuit S or to the switching point 72 of the feed current circuit S The conductor 70 is similarly designed to be connected through a reversing switch 78 either to the switching point 72 of the feed current circuit S or to the switching point 71 of the feed current circuit S Further reference will be made hereinafter to the function of the reversing switches 77 and 78. In the position illustrated, of. FIG. 2, the conductor 69 is connected to the feed current circuit S and the conductor 70 to the feed current circuit S The two diodes 53 and 54 are used to uncouple the two feed current circuits S and S The feed current circuit S is under voltage on the arrival of an impulse gap, whilst the feed current circuit S is under voltage on the arrival of an impulse.

It can now be seen that, in the arrangement shown in FIG. 2, a short-circuiting shunt to the feed current circuits S and S is never formed on arrival of an impulse pattern which corresponds to the impulse pattern associated with the receiver 20, as expressed by the structure of the command key 23, along the paths, leading to the zero potential at the terminal 42, of the switching points 71 and 72 through the reversing switches 77 and 78, the conductors 69 and 70 and the associated links 65 68, the lines 61 64 and the stepping switch 40. Accordingly, the supply of current to the bistable switching element 50 (SCR) is never shut off during the entire sequence of the impulse pattern, so that the switching element 50 remains in the first, i.e., conductive, state.

By contrast, if a received impulse pattern does not correspond to the impulse pattern associated with the receiver 20, as expressed by the structure of the command key 23, a shunt is temporarily'formed from the switching point 71 or 72, depending on whether nonconsistency is detected on the arrival of an expected impulse gap or on the arrival of an expected impulse, to the zero potential across terminal 42 through the reversing switches 77 or 78, the command key 23, one of the lines 61 64 and the stepping switch 40. As a result of this, however, the bistable switching element 50 (SCR) is deprived, at least temporarily, of the holding current so that the switching element 50 falls back into the second non-conductive state and remains there until the end of the impulse pattern.

It is thus clear that, when the state of the bistable switching element 50 is interrogated at the end of the impulse pattern by temporary closure of the switch 33, the impulse switch 59 is only energized and actuated when the impulse pattern received has corresponded to the impulse pattern associated with the receiver 20.

The receiver 20 can be made to respond to two commands very easily without any appreciable further outlay. For each impulse pattern, it is possible to represent an inverse impulse pattern, i.e., one in which impulses and impulse gaps in the second correspond to the impulse gaps and impulses in the first. It is of advantage, for example, to associate a certain impulse pattern with an ON-command for the switch to be remote controlled and to associate the OFF-command for this switch with the inverse impulse pattern. The receiver 20 can then be adjusted to one or other of the two inverse patterns through a simple reversing operation, the aforementioned reversing switches 77 and 78 being provided for this purpose in the embodiment shown in FIG. 2. It is of particular advantage to couple the reversing switches 77 and 78 with the impulse switch 59, as indicated in FIG. 2 by a chain-dot line 79. Following each actuation of the impulse switch 59, the receiver 20 is thus automatically adjusted to the particular inverse impulse pattern.

Since, in the practical application of receivers of the same kind as the receivers 20, it is also necessary to readjust to another remote control command or to another pair of remote control commands, it is of advantage to design the command key 23 (cf. FIG. 2) in such a way that it can be areadily exchanged. Proposals relating to the readjustment of a certain ripple control receiver to another remote control command, have already been put forward, of. for example, British Patent 1,220,011. However, it proved to be necessary in this case to replace those parts of the ripple control receiver which are constituents of a moving mechanism. This involves disadvantages both in regard to the maintenance of tolerances required for satisfactory operation of the mechanism and also in regard to the possibility of damage to the mobile mechanism during replacement of the aforementioned parts.

According to the present invention, however, the receiver 20 can be readjusted to a new remote control command or to a pair of new remote control commands without any of the aforementioned disadvantages. As shown in FIG. 2, the lines determining the impulse pattern or pair of impulse patterns are accommodated in the command key 23. In the practical design of the receiver 20, therefore, the command key 23 is advantageously made in the form of a replaceable component.

Referring to FIG. 4, a command key 23 of this above kind can be constructed to fit into a slideblock-like guide 80. The connections of the lines 61 64 on the one hand and the connections of the reversing switches 77 and 78 on the other hand to the command key 23 are established through contact springs 81 86.

The command key 23 is advantageously produced by the printed-circuit technique with the associated command number 88 displayed on a grip 87.

The command key 23 can also be in the form of a known reversing switch designed to be actuated by punched cards.

In order to make the receiver 20 respond to a collective command (and the corresponding inverse counter command) in addition to its individual command (and the corresponding inverse counter command), it is necessary to make the testing means for detecting consistency between the received impulse pattern and the associated impulse pattern temporarily inactive. The command key 23 connected to the branch circuits S and S (cf. FIG. 2) acts as the testing means in conjunction with the stepping switch 40 connected through the lines 61 64.

A collective command for the receiver 20 whose individual command impulse pattern is shown in FIG. 1 could have an impulse pattern S in accordance with FIG. 1a. Like the individual command impulse pattern 2, this collective command impulse pattern S represents a 2nd class combination of four elements, two impulse gaps; 11 and 12 S, two impulses; 13 S and 14.

The effective link between the testing means and the bistable switching element 50 is broken by bringing the connections 66 and 67 into their associated central po sition 74, 75 (shown in chain-lines in FIG. 2) in the command key 23. the connections 66 and 67 are associated with the intervals T and T (cf. FIG. 1 and FIG. 1a) by means of the reversing switch 40. The effective link between the testing means and bistable switching element 50 is broken at point 74 or 75 during this interval. It can be seen from FIG. 1a that this break occurs during the two intervals T and T occupied by different binary characters in the impulse pattern 2.

In cases where impulse patterns with a relatively large number of elements, for example n and combinations of a higher class, for example of the 5th class, are used to form the impulse patterns, it is also possible for collective commands to be formed in such a way that the effective link between the testing means and the bistable circuit element is broken in more than two intervals. For reasons of immunity for interference, it is of advantage to select the collective commands in such a way that intervals which are occupied with different binary characters become the non-monitored intervals.

Referring to FIG. 5, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts as above, the command set 22 can alternatively be constructed without the mechanical reversing switches 77, 78 (cf. FIG. 2). To this end, the circuit arrangement is modified so as to include another bistable switching element 50 a which, in the same way as the circuit element 50 mentioned above, is able to draw current in a conductive state on the arrival of an impulse gap from the terminal 38 through a resistor 51a and a diode 530 or on the arrival of an impulse from the terminal 39 through a resistor 52 a and a diode 54 a. Accordingly, there are two feed current circuits S and S for the additional switching element 50a. The circuit element 50 a is triggered in the same way as the circuit element 50.

A bistable impulse switch 59 a with two windings 91 and 92 is used to carry out the remote control command. Accordingly, there is a circuit from the terminal 35 through the line 58, the winding 91 and a diode 93 to the first bistable switching element 50, and another circuit from the tenninal 35 through the line 58, the winding 92 and a diode 94 to the other bistable switching element 50 a. The two diodes 93 and 94 are used to uncouple the two circuits.

The switching point 71 of the feed current circuit S is connected through a diode 95 to the conductor 70 of the command key 23. The switching point 72 of the feed current circuit S is connected through a diode 96 to the conductor 69 of the command key 23. A switching point 71a of the other feed current circuit S is connected through a diode 97 to the conductor 69 of the command key 23, whilst a switching point 72a of the other feed current circuit S is connected through a diode 98 to the conductor 70 of the command key 23. It can be seen that, by means of the diode 95 to 98, the first feed current circuit (S of the first bistable switching element 50 and the second feed current circuit (S of the second bistable switching element 50 a are connected to the conductor 70 of the command key, whilst on the other hand the second feed current circuit (S of the first bistable switching element (5) and the first feed current circuit (S of the second bistable switching element are connected to the conductor 69 of the command key 23.

On the arrival of an impulse pattern of the kind shown in FIG. 1, in which case the command key 23 is intended to be the same as in FIG. 2, the command set operates as follows.

The received impulse pattern and the impulse pattern associated with the ripple control receiver for the ON- command, will be assumed to correspond to FIG. 1.

After starting, positive voltage is present at the terminal 32 for the period of time from t to L, (cf. FIG. 3, line E). As a result, the two bistable switching elements and 50a are started, i.e., brought into their conduc tive state. Thereafter, the supply of current to the switching element 50 is never impaired during the period of reception of the impulse pattern. Accordingly, a shunt to the terminal 42 is never formed via the command key 23, the lines 61-64 and the stepping switch 40. Accordingly, the switching element 50 remains conductive and, during interrogation, i.e., during closure of the switch 30, a current impulse flows through the winding 91 of the impulse switch 59a. As a result, the impulse switch 590 carries out its ON-command or, if already in the ON-position, remains in this position.

By contrast, the bistable switching element 50a is actually brought into its non-conductive stage during the interval T, because, on the arrival of an impulse gap, the holding-current flowing through the circuit S to the switching element 50a through the diode 97, the

conductor 69, the command key 23, the line 61 and the stepping switch 40 is removed from the switching element 50a. As a result, this switching element 50a is brought into its non-conductive state and remains there until the end.

If, by contrast, the impulse pattern received is inverse to FIG. 1, in other words if the associated remote control command is an OFF-command, a shunt is correspondingly formed through the command key 23 for the switching element 50 during reception of this inverse impulse pattern. As a result, the switching element 50 is brought into its nonconductive state. On the other hand, the switching element 50a retains its conductive state upon the completion of the inverse impulse pattern. As a result, a current impulse is delivered through the winding 92 of the impulse switch 59a during interrogation, i.e., during the period for which the switch 30 is closed. Under the effect of this current impulse, the impulse switch is brought into its OFF- position corresponding to the remote control command expressed by the inverse impulse pattern received providing the impulse switch is not already in this position.

As already mentioned, it is also possible for the switching functions taking place in the basic unit 21 to be carried out in a purely electronic manner without any mechanically moved switches. One embodiment of an electronic reversing switch 36a is shown in FIG. 6. This electronic reversing switch 36a performs the same function as the reversing switch 36 in FIG. 2 or FIG. 5.

The reversing switch 36a comprises a switching transistor 101 and a switching transistor 102. If the switching transistor 101 is conductive, positive voltage is delivered from the terminal 37 to the terminal 38. If by contrast the switching transistor 102 is conductive, positive voltage is delivered from the terminal 37 to the terminal 39. In order to control the switching transistors 101 and 102, an alternating current impulse removed by a filter (not shown) for the power supply system is delivered to the electronic switch 36a at an input terminal 103. The alternating current impulse is rectified by a rectifier 104 and thereafter charges a capacitor 105. When the charging voltage of the capacitor 105 exceeds the Zener voltage of the diode 106, a currentflows to a resistor 107 and to the base 108 of the switching transistor 102. As a result, the transistor 102 becomes conductive, i.e., the positive voltage at the terminal 37 is switched through to the terminal 39. Accordingly, a current flows through a diode 109 and a resistor 110 which is connected to a terminal 111 at negative potential. Through the drop in voltage across the resistor 110, the base-emitter voltage across the switching transistor 101 is so greatly reduced that the switching transistor 101 becomes blocked.

If an impulse gap appears in the impulse pattern received, the ac. voltage across the terminal 103 disappears. The switching transistor 102 is thus blocked. On the other hand, a current flows to the terminal 37 through the resistors 112, 113 and 110 to the terminal 111. The effect of this is that the switching transistor 101 is driven and carries the positive voltage from terminal 37 to terminal 38.

Referring to FIG. 7, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts as above, several command sets 22 are connected to a single basic unit 21 of a ripple control receiver 20. In this embodiment, however, the individual command sets 22 have to be uncoupled with respect to one another in known manner by diodes 61a, 62a, 63a and 64a in the lines 61, 62, 63 and 64. Each of the command sets 22 is also provided with its own command key 23 and accordingly only responds to the remote control commands determined by the command key.

Even in an embodiment of the kind shown in FIG. 5, it is possible to connect further command sets 22 to a single basic unt 21, in which case, diodes 61a 64a again have to be provided for uncoupling as explained with reference to FIG. 7. I

The effectiveness of the shunts formed through the command key 23, the lines 61 64 and the stepping switch 40 in the event of non-consistency between the impulse pattern received and the impulse pattern associated with the ripple control receiver or one of its command sets 22, can be improved even further by connecting at least one diode (FIG. 7) in the forward direction between the cathode terminal of the bistable switching element 50 or 50a and the terminal 42.

What is claimed is:

l. A method for remote control comprising the steps of forming an individual command impulse pattern of a particular class of elements including a plurality of stages having a predetermined number of said stages occupied by binary characters of a first type and a predetermined number of said stages occupied by binary characters of a second type;

transmitting said individual command impulse pattern to a receiver of a group of differently programmed receivers programmed for responding to a predetermined individual command impulse pattern of a plurality of stages;

forming a collective command impulse pattern for collectively activating a number of said differently programmed receivers, said latter pattern being of the same class of elements and stages as said individual command impulse pattern, said collective command impulse pattern having a part of said stages thereof different from said individual command impulse pattern for representing a command;

transmitting either of said command impulse patterns to said receiver;

checking a received command impulse pattern for consistency of the respective binary characters in only those stages of the command impulse pattern where said predetermined individual command impulse pattern has the same type of binary character as a collective command impulse pattern allotted to said individual command impulse pattern and non-checking at least two stages of the received command impulse pattern, whereby said at least two stages are occupied in the corresponding individual command impulse pattern by at least one binary character of the first type and at least one binary character of the second type;

thereby programming said receiver to respond to its predetermined individual command impulse pattern as well as to an allotted collective command impulse pattern.

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Referenced by
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US3921168 *Jan 18, 1974Nov 18, 1975Damon CorpRemote sensing and control system
US4188664 *Nov 15, 1977Feb 12, 1980Phillips Petroleum CompanyI/O Terminal identification
US4868731 *Dec 8, 1988Sep 19, 1989Zellweger Uster AgGate control circuit for a GTO thyristor
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Classifications
U.S. Classification340/4.3, 340/4.36, 340/12.29
International ClassificationH02J13/00
Cooperative ClassificationH02J13/0031, Y04S40/146, Y04S40/122, Y02B90/2623, Y02B90/2692, H02J13/0024
European ClassificationH02J13/00F4B2B2B, H02J13/00F4B2B