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Publication numberUS3834056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateMar 23, 1972
Priority dateMar 23, 1972
Publication numberUS 3834056 A, US 3834056A, US-A-3834056, US3834056 A, US3834056A
InventorsFilippi E, Smith M
Original AssigneeFilippi E, Smith M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Powered line casting arrangement
US 3834056 A
Abstract
A powered line casting arrangement utilizing a pressurized fluid to launch a projectile to which the line to be cast is attached.
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

nited States Patent [191 Filippi et a1.

[451 Sept. 10, 1974 1 POWERED LINE CASTING ARRANGEMENT Inventors: Ernest A. Filippi, 18776 Kenya St., Northridge, Calif. 91324; Matthew S. Smith, 4400 Sarah St. No. 29, Burbank, Calif. 91505 Filed: Mar. 23, 1972 Appl. No.: 237,372

US. Cl. 43/19, 42/35 Int. Cl A0lk 91/02 Field of Search 43/19, 18, 42.35;

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Bonanno 43/42.35

Primary Examine'rl-1ugh R. Chamblee Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Don B. Finkelstein [5 7 ABSTRACT A powered line casting arrangement utilizing a pressurized fluid to launch a projectile to which the line to be cast is attached.

39 Claims, 28 Drawing Figures F IENIEDsEPI 0mm SHEET 6 of 3 1 rowan LINE CASTING ARRANGEMENT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to the line casting art and more particularly to a pressurized fluid launched powered line casting arrangement 2. Description of the Prior Art In many applications, such as rescue operations, message carrying, fishing or the like, it is often desired to cast a line to distances remote from the location of the line casting device. Often, in these applications, it is desired to make a cast further than can normally be obtained by conventional manual casting techniques.

Therefore, there have heretofore been developed various arrangements for providing a powered casting system. Generally, the material to be cast comprises a projectile to which the line is coupled. In fishing applications, of course, it is usually desired to cast the bait, or lure, a float or a weight, and the fishing line itself.

In the prior art fishing arrangements there has heretofore been utilized such power providing systems as springs, resilient rubber actuators, explosives, and'in certain applications, compressed gases. In general, such arrangements have required modification to the fishing rod, the reel, other standard fishing equipment or development of an entirely new fishing rod structure to accommodate the powered casting system. That is, such structures have incorporated resilient or springlike members mounted on the rod for launching the material to be cast.

Other prior art structures have incorporated crossbow or longbow type structures on the rod and the spring action of the bow launches the material to be cast.

Still other prior art structures have utilized carriages powered by springs, resilient members or the like, mounted on the fishing rod with the material to be cast mounted on the carriage. As the carriage is accelerated down the length of the fishing rod and stopped at the end thereof, the material to be cast, due to its momentum, continues moving past the fishing rod.

Because of the modification to the fishing rod, the reel or the provision of an entirely new fishing rod structure, such prior art devices have not proven to be completely satisfactory.

Thus, there has long been a need for a powered fishing line casting arrangement in which the basic fishing rod and reel are not modified in any way and all structure necessary for providing the launching of the material to be cast to regions remote to position of the fisherman are external to the fishing rod and/or reel.

Similarly, in rescue operations, there has long been a need for a compact, yet powerful, line casting arrangement to carry a line to distant locations despite adverse weather conditions that may exist.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved powered line casting arrange,- ment.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a powered fishing line casting arrangement utilizing conventional fishing rods and reels.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a powered fishing line casting arrangement that 2 may he quickly :uulcusilv utilized by fishermen In an desired fishing application.

The above and other objects of the present invention are achieved, according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, by providing a source of pressurized fluid. The source of pressurized fluid may comprise a pressure vessel filled with a compressed gas such as air or CO or it may contain a pressurized liquid therein wherein the pressurization of the liquid is achieved by a pressurized gas. In yet another embodiment of the present invention the source of pressurized fluid may comprise a solid propellant cartridge means, such as a blank shell or the like, which, when ignited, generates a gas under pressure.

In other embodiments of the present invention other sources of a gas under pressure may be utilized. For example, a liquid such as ether or propane may be metered into a combustion chamber and ignited by compression to provide the gas under pressure. Alternatively, spark (or glow plug) ignition of a metered amount of gasoline, kerosene or the like in a combustion chamber can be utilized to provide the gas under pressure.

A tubular projector spike is coupled to the source of pressurized fluid and the tubular projector spike has a preselected length extending from a fluid inlet end, which is coupled to the source of pressurized fluid, to a fluid discharge end. The tubular projector spike has internal walls defining a fluid passageway extending therethrough and the external walls thereof define a projector tube engaging surface.

A control means which, in a preferred embodiment of the present invention, may comprise a spring loaded poppet valve is coupled to the source of pressurized fluid and controls the flow of pressurized fluid into the fluid passageway of the projector spike.

A projectile is removably mounted on the tubular projector spike and the projectile generally comprises a body member having a preselected external configuration extending from a forward portion to a base portion thereof and an internal cavity in the body member. Walls in the internal cavity define a projector tube and the projector tube has a closed end and an open end. The walls of the projector tube are slideably mountable on the external walls of the projector spike, and the closed end of the projector tube when the projectile is so mounted is positioned adjacent the fluid discharge end of the projector spike. The line to be cast is coupled to the projectile.

The projectile itself may comprise, in fishing applications, a lure, a float, a sinker or similar structure. With a lure, of course, in general, only hooks are provided attached thereto. With floats and sinkers, however, bait, which may be live bait, dead bait, or a lure, is usually coupled thereto for attracting the fish. When bait is so utilized, the bait is connected by a bait line to the projectile and moves with the projectile.

Actuation of the control means allows a preselected amount of the pressurized fluid to flow from the source of the pressurized fluid into the fluid passageway of the projector spike and from there into the projector tube. The pressurized fluid acting on the projector tube launches the projectile to regions remote to the location of the source of pressurized fluid.

The projectile may be provided with aerodynamic stabilization means such as drag ring for drag stabilization or canted fins for fin plus spin stabilization thereof Because of the high g loading associated with the launching from such a structure as above described, in certain preferred embodiments of the present invention there is also incorporated a load limiting structure for limiting the acceleration forces imposed during the launch thereof. That is, since the acceleration forces may be on the order of 1,000 to 3,000 gs, such high forces might often in fishing applications, strip the bait from the hook. Also, in other applications, the high g loading might tend to break the line to be cast. It has been found that an acceptable range of g forces for the bait during launch is on the order of, for example, 50 to 200 gs. Therefore, in these certain preferred embodiments of the present invention the load limiting de vice is coupled to the projectile and the bait, as well as the fishing line to be cast, is coupled to the load limiting device. The load limiting device limits the acceleration forces to which the bait and the line is subjected during the launch of the projectile.

It will be appreciated that, while the following description of the present invention shows the invention as incorporated in powered fishing line casting embodiments, this has been done for illustrative purposes only. The invention may equally well be utilized in any application where it is desired to cast a line to remote locations.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The above and other embodiments of the present invention may be more fully understood from the following detailed description taken together with the accompanying drawings wherein similar reference characters refer to similar elements throughout and in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a source of pressurized fluid and control means useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates another source of pressurized fluid and control means useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 4 illustrates another source of pressurized fluid and control means useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 5 illustrates a lure useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a view along the line 6 6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 illustrates another lure useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a view along the line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 illustrates another lure useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 10 illustrates a float useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 11 illustrates another float useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a view along the line 12-12 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 illustrates another float useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 14 illustrates a sinker useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 15 illustrates another sinker useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 16 illustrates another sinker useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 17 illustrates another sinker useful in the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 18 is a view along the line 18-18 of FIG. 17;

FIG. 25 illustrates another brake means useful in the 4 practice of the present invention;

FIG. 26 is a sectional view along the line 26-26 of FIG. 25;

FIG. 27 illustrates another brake means useful in the practice of the present invention; and

FIG. 28 illustrates a safety catch means useful in the practice of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As noted above, the present invention may advantageously be utilized in any line casting application. For illustrative purposes only, the present invention is shown on the accompanying drawings and described herein as utilized in fishing line casting applications. However, the line casting structure described may, of course, be utilized in any other desired application.

In a powered fishing line casting arrangement, the present invention contemplates not only the improved powered fishing line casting arrangement in which conventional fishing rods, spinning reels and other fishing tackle may be conveniently utilized without alteration, but also new and improved structure comprising the individual components of the arrangement. Thus, new and improved sources of pressurized fluid may be utilized in the powered fishing line cast arrangement to provide the energy source. New and improved control means may also be utilized to control the flow of the pressurized fluid.

An integral part of the system is the projectile that is launched by the pressurized fluid and to which the fishing line and, if desired, the bait, is attached. New and improved projectiles are also within the contemplation of the present invention and such projectiles may generally comprise lures, floats or sinkers. Since lures are generallythe bait themselves, there is not usually separate live or dead bait attached to the projectile when it is a lure. However, when the projectile comprises a float or a sinker, in general, there is bait attached to the projectile. The bait may be a lure itself that is too small to be conveniently adapted to the present invention. Alternatively, the bait may be live or dead bait.

In order to avoid breaking the line to be cast and/or stripping the bait during the high acceleration forces existing during launch, the present invention also contemplates the utilization of a load limiting arrangement to reduce the effective acceleration forces to which the line and/or bait may be subjected.

Additionally, the present invention also contemplates the provision of various means of coupling the bait and- /or the line to the projectile.

The source of pressurized fluid may be fabricated in any desired size. It may be fabricated in a size small enough to be conveniently attached to the belt or other article of clothing of for example, a fisherman orit may be a larger more stationary source placed upon the ground adjacent to the fisherman. The source of pressurized fluid, desirably, has a multiple function capability. That is, the source of pressurized fluid may be conveniently utilized over and over again during fishing.

Further, as noted above, the present invention may also be advantageously utilized in many other line casting arrangements such as mountain climbing, rescue operations or the like.

With the above in mind, reference is made to FIG. 1 wherein there is shown the structure associated with a preferred embodiment of the present invention and generally designated 10. As shown on FIG. 1, the embodiment as adapted to a fishing application, generally comprises a source of pressurized fluid 12 to which there is coupled a control means 14 and projector spike 16.

A projectile, generally designated 18, is slideably mounted on the projector spike 16 and is adapted to be launched therefrom upon actuation of the control means 14. A line to be cast, such as fishing line 22 is attached to the projectile 18 and, in certain applications, bait 24 may also be attached to the projectile 18.

The fishing line 22 is attached to a conventional spinning reel means 26 that is attached to a fishing rod 28.

Since one of the advantages of the present invention is that conventional reels and fishing rods as well as other fishing tackle may be conveniently utilized with the powered fishing line casting arrangement of the present invention, fishing rod 28 and reel 26 do not, in themselves form part of the present invention.

As noted above, the source of pressurized fluid 12 may be fabricated in sizes small enough to be conveniently carried on the clothing of the fisherman and, in those applications, a handle means 30 may be coupled to the source of pressurized fluid 12. In other embodiments, of course, the source of pressurized fluid 12 may be in sizes sufficiently large so that carrying them would impose undue restrictions upon the activities associated with fishing. In such cases, the handle 30 may be omitted and the source of pressurized fluid 12 may be conveniently placed upon the ground adjacent to the fisherman. The source of pressurized fluid 12 may also incorporate a fill valve 32 for replenishing the supply of pressurized fluid contained therein.

Referring now to FIG. 2, there is illustrated one embodiment of the source of pressurized fluid 12 and the control means 14 shown in FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 2, the source of pressurized fluid 12 may comprise a pressure vessel 34 containing a pressurized fluid 36, which may be, for example, compressed air, CO or the like. The pressurized fluid control means 14 is coupled to the outlet 38 of the pressure vessel 34 and has first walls 40 defining a valve chamber 42 having a pressurized fluid inlet end 44 and a pressurized fluid outlet end 46.

Second walls 48 in the valve chamber 42 generally comprise a valve seat to which there may be attached a valve seal 50. A poppet valve 52 has a sealing portion v 54 in the valve chamber 42 adjacent the valve seat 48 and sealing means 50 and a stem portion 56 projecting to regions external the valve chamber 42.

A spring means 58 has preselected spring constant and is mounted in the valve chamber 42 for resiliently urging the sealing portion 54 of the poppet valve 52 into sealing relationship with the seal means 50 of the valve seat 48. For the position shown in FIG. 2, the poppet valve 52 is sealed against the seal means 50 and there is no flow of pressurized fluid 36 into the fluid outlet end 46.

The tubular projector spike 16 which had a fluid inlet end 60, a fluid discharge end 62 and a preselected length therebetween is coupled to the fluid outlet end 46 of the valve chamber 42. The tubular pojector spike 16 may be removably attached to the control means 14 for example by threadingly engaging the walls thereof, or may be permanently attached. Where it is detachably coupled, different size projector spikes may be interchangeably utilized.

The tubular projector spike 16 has internal walls 64 defining a fluid passageway 66 therethrough extending from the fluid inlet end 60 to the fluid discharge end 62 thereof and external walls 68 defining a projector tube engaging surface.

An actuator means 70 is part of the control means 14 and generally comprises a shaft means 72 that extends vertically upward from the valve chamber 42 and has a preselected length between an outer end 74 and an inner end 76. The inner end 76 of the shaft means 72 is adjacent the stem portion 56 of the poppet valve 52. An actuator weight means 78 is slideably mounted on the shaft means 72 and is movable therealong from the outer end 74 to the inner end 76 under gravity forces. For the actuator weight means 78 at the inner end 76 of the shaft means 72, the actuator weight 78 engages the stem portion 56 of the poppet valve 52. If desired, a safety catch, generally designated 71, may be provided to retain the actuator weight means 78 at one or more preselected locations on the shaft 70. Thus, a detent 73 may be provided on the shaft 78. A plunger is mounted in a cavity 77 in the actuator weight 78 and is spring loaded by spring means 79 towards the shaft 78. When the plunger 75 engages the detent 73, the actuator weight 78 is retained at the position on the shaft 70 to prevent inadvertent actuation of poppet valve 52.

In order to accommodate projectiles 18 having various sizes of projector tubes therein, as described below, a sleeve means 61 may be removably mounted on the tubular projector spike l6 and be provided with any desired diameter A to accept the projector tube on the walls 63 thereof.

In conventional CO bottles, the bottle is generally refilled through the poppet valve 52 and, in such cases, the separate filler 32 may be omitted.

The projector spike l6, and the corresponding projector tube in the projectile 18 may be of any desired cross sectional configuration. The particular shape chosen is not limited to cylindrical as illustrated on the drawing.

Operation of the control means 14, in this embodiment, is achieved by raising the actuator weight 78 a preselected distance along the shaft 72 and releasing it. As the actuator weight 78 falls under the influence of gravity, it engages the stem portion 56 of the poppet 52 and unseats the sealing portion 54 thereof from the seal 50 at the valve seat 48 and allows the flow of pressurized fluid 36 from the pressure vessel 34 through the valve chamber 42 and into the tubular passageway 66 of the projector spike 16. Depending upon the height to which the actuator weight 78 is raised, the poppet valve 52 will be unseated for various lengths of time allowing different amounts of pressurized fluid 36 to flow therefrom into the tubular passageway 66 of the projector spike 16. However, the spring constant of the spring means 58 is selected so that for the condition of the actuator weight 78 at rest upon the stem portion 56 of the poppet valve 52, the sealing portion 54 is sealed against the sealing means 50 of the valve seat 48 and no flow of pressurized fluid 36 is allowed. Thus, there is a certain minimum height on the shaft means 72 to which the actuator weight 78 must be raised in order to unseat the poppet valve 52, and allow the flow of pressurized fluid to the projector spike l6. Indicator markings 80 may be provided on the shaft means 72 to correspond to certain distances to which the projectile 18 (FIG. 1) is cast for the actuator weight raised to that particular height. Such indicator markings, of course, must also correlate the weight and drag of the particular projectile 18 that is utilized.

The poppet valve 52 may also be unseated by manually or otherwise depressing the stem portion 56 thereof.

FIG. 3 illustrates another embodiment of a source of pressurized fluid, generally designated 90 useful in the practice of the present invention. The source of pressurized fluid 90 may be utilized in place of the source of pressurized fluid 12 illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. The source of pressurized fluid 90 may generally comprise a pressure vessel 92 having a fill valve 94 and a pressurized fluid outlet end 96. A control means 98 may be coupled to the outlet end 96 of the pressure vessel 92 and, in general, may be similar to the control means 14 described above except that there is provided third walls 100 defining a dip tube 102 extending through the outlet end 96 of the pressure vessel 92 to regions adjacent the bottom 104 thereof.

In this embodiment 90 of the source of pressurized fluid, there may be provided a liquid, such as water, 106 in the pressure vessel 92 and a gas under pressure 108 therein. The gas under pressure 108 may be, for example, compressed air, which may be admitted into the pressure vessel 92 through the fill valve 94. The fill valve 94 may be of the conventional fill valve type commonly utilized and allows filling of the pressurized gas 108 from a hand pump, or from any other source of compressed air such as that commonly available at automobile service stations or the like.

The gas under pressure 108 forces the liquid 106 up the dip tube 102. When the control means 98, which incorporates a poppet valve 110, similar to the poppet valve 52 described above and a spring means 112 which is similar to the spring means 58 described above, is unseated by actuation of, for example, an actuator weight (not shown in FIG. 3), such as that shown in FIG. 2, the liquid 106 is allowed to flow into the pro jector spike that is coupled thereto.

While the above embodiments of the source of pressurized fluid 12 and incorporate the storage of compressed gas and/or liquid, it will be appreciated that other sources of a fluid under pressure may equally well be utilized.

In certain applications of the present invention wherein a very compact unit is desired for comparatively long casting distances, for example on the order of 135 yards or so, or comparatively heavy projectiles are to be launched, a solid propellant-type cartridge, or liquid propellant charge, which, when ignited, generates a gas under pressure may be desirable.

Such an embodiment of a source of pressurized fluid, generally designated 120, is illustrated in FIG. 4. The source of pressurized fluid generally comprises a cartridge chamber 122 to which there is attached a conventional breech arrangement 124. The breech arrangement 124 illustrated on FIG. 4 is to single shot arrangement. However, it will be appreciated that a revolver or automatic pistol-type structure may equally well be utilized in the present invention. The breech arrangement 124 has a trigger 126, a safety 128 as well as a cocking lever 130. A breech clamp 132 clamps the breech to the cartridge chamber 122. In general, the structure of the breech 124, whether single shot revolver or automatic is of conventional design and does not, in in itself, form a part of the present invention.

A propellant cartridge 143 which, for example, may be a blank cartridge, 22-shot cartridge or the like, is positioned in the cartridge chamber 132 and is ignited by operation of the trigger 126 of the breech mechanism 124.

The cartridge chamber 122 has internal walls 136 defining a pressurized fluid passageway 138. A tubular projector spike 140 is coupled to the cartridge chamber 122 and has internal walls 142 defining a fluid passageway 144 through which gases under pressure may flow from the fluid passageway 138 of the cartridge chamber 122. The tubular projector spike 140 serves the same function as tubular projector spike 16 illustrated in FIG. 2.

Base wall 146 defines a residue trap cavity 148 that is accessible through two removably mounted cleanout plugs 150 and 152. After a preselected number of firings of propellant cartridges 134, the clean-out plugs 150 and 152 may be removed and any residue in the cavity 148 may be removed.

A supporting spike means 154 may be coupled to the cartridge chamber 122 to allow insertion of the supporting spike 154 into the ground for support in the cartridge chamber 122 thereon.

Release of the safety 128 and cocking of the cocking lever of the breech 124 allows ignition of the solid propellant charge 134 by the trigger 126. When the trigger 126 is actuated, the solid propellant cartridge 124 is ignited and generates hot gases under pressure which flow through the passageway of the projector spike 140. A projectile, such as the projectile 18 shown on FIG. 1 that may be mounted on the tubular projector spike is thus launched.

From the above description of the various types of sources of pressurized fluid, it will be appreciated that many variations in the type of pressurized fluid as well as the pressurized fluid container may be utilized to advantage in the practice of the present invention.

As noted above, the projectile 18 may generally comprise a lure, a sinker or a float. FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate one embodiment of a lure that is advantageously utilized in the present powered fishing line casting arrangement. However, whether the projectile 18 is a lure, a float or a sinker, in general, it will be provided with a body member and the first or external walls of the body member define a preselected shape. The body member also has a forward portion and a base portion and is provided with an internal cavity. There is provided within the internal cavity second walls that define a projector tube. The projector tube generally has a closed end and an open end and the open end may be inserted on the projector spike 16 (shown in FIG. 1) with the closed end adjacent to the fluid discharge end 'of the projector spike 16. The walls of the projector tube are slideably mountable on the external walls of the projector spike 16 to allow launching of the projectile when the fluid under pressure is allowed to flow into the fluid passageway of the projector.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate one form of the projectile 18, wherein the projectile 18 is a fish head lure, generally designated 160. It will be appreciated that the lure may take any desired form and external configuration required for different fishing applications. The fish head lure 160 generally has a body member 162 that may be painted on the external surfaces 164 thereof with any form fish head or other design desired. The body member 162 has first walls 166 that define a preselected external configuration and, in this embodiment 160, it is, as noted above, a generally fish head configuration having an arcuate forward portion 168 and a planar base portion 170. The base portion 170 has a base means 172 coupled to the first walls 166 for closing the base portion 170.

The first walls 166 generally define an internal cavity 174 in which there are second walls 176 defining a projector tube 177 having a closed end 178. The closed end 178 of the projector tube 177 is intermediate the arcuate forward portion 168 and planar base portion 170 of the body member 162. The projector tube 177 also has an open end 180, that in the embodiment of the lure 160, is substantially coplanar with the base means 172. The base means 172 has walls 182 therethrough defining an aperture communicating with the projector tube 177.

The second walls 176 of the lure 160 are slideably mountable on the external walls of, for example, external walls 68 of the projector spike 16. When the lure 160 is mounted on the projector spike 16, the closed end 178 is adjacent the fluid discharge end 162 of the projector spike. Admission of pressurized fluid into the fluid passageway 66 of the projector spike 16 launches the lure 160 to regions remote the source of pressurized fluid l2.

Hook means such as hooks 184 and 186 may be coupled to the body member 162 in any desired locations.

The fishing line to be cast 22 is coupled to the body member 162 by means of, for example, a bale hook means 188 in regions adjacent the planar base portion 170 by means of eyelets 190.

In general, it will be appreciated, either live or dead bait is not utilized when the projectile 18 is in the form of a lure such as the lure 160. That is, the lure 160 itself forms the bait for attracting the fish.

When the projectile 18 is in the form of a lure, it may be also in the form of an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized float lure or a sinker lure.

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate one embodiment of an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized sinker lure generally designated 200 useful in the practice of the present invention. The sinker lure 200 generally has a body member 202 having first walls 204 defining an internal cavity 206. The first walls 204 also define a preselected external configuration which, as illustrated on FIGS. 7 and 8, is generally cylindrical having a preselected diameter, indicated by the letter D, and a longitudinal axis thereof 208. A forward portion 210 of the first walls 204 is generally arcuate, such as in ogive form, and a base portion 212 thereof is generally planar. Second walls 214 of the body member 202 in the internal cavity 206 define a projector tube 216 having a closed end 218 that is intermediate the arcuate forward portion 210 and planar base portion 212. The projector tube 216 also has an open end 220 that is adjacent the planar base portion 212. The projector tube 216 communicates with regions external the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized lure 200.

Since the aerodynamic lure 200 is a sinker lure there are provided weight means 222 in the internal cavity 206. The weight means 202 have a preselected weight to provide that the total weight of the aerodynamic lure 200 is greater than the weight of water displaced thereby. Additionally, the position of the weight means 222 with respect to the longitudinal axis 208 and the forward portion 210 of the body member 202 is selected to provide the proper aerodynamic characteristics desired.

A plurality of aerodynamic canted fin means 224, 226 and 228 are coupled to the body member 202 on the external surfaces thereof to provide fin plus spin stabilization of the aerodynamic lure 200 during launch and ballistic trajectory thereof. It has been found that to achieve the desired fin plus stabilization the aerodynamic fin means 224, 226 and 228 should be canted with respect to the longitudinal axis 208 approximately 12. Each of the aerodynamic fin means 224, 226 and 228 are adjacent the planar base portion 212 of the body member 202 and extend a preselected distance forward towards the forward portion 210.

A plurality of hook means 230 may be coupled tothe aerodynamic lure 200 in any desired location thereon. The fishing line to be cast 22 is coupled to the aerodynamic lure 200 by means of, for example, a bale hook 232 connected to the body member 202 by eyelets 234 at the planar base portion 212 thereof.

The second walls 214 defining the projector tube 216 are slideably mounted on the projector spike, such as projector spike 16 of FIG. 2, and launching of the aerodynamic lure 200 is achieved as described in connection with the lure shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

As noted, suitable external designs may be added, I

such as the fish head design shown on FIG. 7 and/or additional attracting means such as feather 236 may be also coupled to the aerodynamic lure 200.

A fairing 203 may be added, in preferred embodiments, to the lure 200 and be provided with a symmetrical forward end 207 arcuate in shape to provide satisfactory flight characteristics. However, the rear end 205 of the fairing 203 is asymmetrical and provided with a flat portion 205. When the lure 200 is dragged backwards through the water, the flattened portion 205' induces an oscillation or wiggle to simulate the motion of a fish and thus enhance the fish attracting capability of the lure 200.

The aerodynamic lure may also take the form of a float-type lure. FIG. 9 illustrates an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized float-type lure generally designated 240. The float-type lure 240 is similar to the sinker lure 200 shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 and is generally comprised of a body member 242 having first walls 244 defining an internal cavity 246. Second walls 248 are in the intemal cavity 246 adjacent the planar base portion 250 of the body member 242 and define a projector tube 252. The projector tube 252 has a closed end 254 intermediate the planar base portion 250 and the arcuate forward portion 256 of the body member 242 and an open end 258 that is adjacent the planar base portion 250.

One or more weight means, such as weight means 260, may be coupled to the internal cavity 246 to provide appropriate aerodynamic balance.

A bouyancy jacket, such as bouyancy jacket 262, may be coupled to the body member 242, for example on the external surfaces thereof.

The jacket 262 has a rounded symmetric forward end 261 and an asymmetric aft end provided by the flattened portion 263. The asymmetry thus provided generates appropriate wiggle when the lure 240 is dragged backwards through the water, as described above. The

bouyancy jacket 262 may be a solid material lighter than water or, as shown in FIG. 13, may be comprised of a hollow member coupled to the body member 242. The bouyancy jacket 262 is selected to provide the total weight of the float-type lure 240 that is less than the amount of water displaced thereby.

The body member 242 is generally cylindrical and has a preselected diameter indicated by the letter D and a longitudinal axis 264. A plurality of aerodynamic fin means, which for example, may be three aerodynamically fin means similar to the three aerodynamically fin means shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, of which aerodynamic fin means 266 and 268 are shown in FIG. 9, are coupled to the external surfaces of the body member 242 and may be canted approximately twelve degrees to the longitudinal axis 264 in order to provide proper aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilization during launch and ballistic trajectory of the aerodynamic float-type lure 240.

Hook means such as hook means 270 and 272 may be coupled in any desired locations on the external surfaces of the body member 242. The fishing line 22 that is to be cast may be coupled to the aerodynamic floattype lure by means of bale hook 274 coupled to the body member 242 by means of eyelets 276 in a manner similar to that described for the bale hook 232 in FIG. 7.

The above descriptions of the various types of lures that may be utilized in the present invention are illustrative of the many variations that may be incorporated for such utilization. In general, it has been found that a typical lure will weigh on the order of one-eighth of an ounce to sixteen ounces. The heavier lures will, in general, be larger and can easily accommodate the projector tube necessary for the practice of the present invention. However, in the smaller lures, wherein the physical size thereof prevents the incorporation of a projector tube, the lure itself may be utilized as the bait in connection with a projectile that is either a sinker or a float, as described below in greater detail. The lighter weight lures may be utilized with a fishing line that, typically, may be on the order of two pound fishing line while lures having three to seven ounce weights have been found to be satisfactory with utilization with fifteen pound fishing line. Similarly, the heavier weight lures will require heavier tensile strength fishing line. In those lures, or other projectiles, incorporating the aerodynamic fins, it has been found that the canting of the fins in addition to providing aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilization during launch and ballistic trajectory also provides additional rotational movement about the longitudinal axis when the lure is in the water. Such additional rotational movement of the lure, and/or other additional movement that may be induced by the fins while in the water, help to attract the fish to the lure. It has been found that suitable materials for construction of the lure may be metal, reinforced plastic or the like.

The projectile 18 may also take the form of a float. FIG. 10 is a sectional view through one embodiment of a float generally designated 280 useful in the practice of the present invention. As shown, the float 280 has a body member 282 having first walls 283 defining a preselected external configuration which, in the float 280, is generally cylindrical about a longitudinal axis 285 and having a preselected diameter, indicated by the letter D on FIG. 10, and has a forward portion 284 and a base portion 286. Both the forward portion 284 and the base portion 286 are generally planar in the float lure 280.

The body member 282 also has walls 288 defining an internal cavity 290. Second walls 292 in the internal cavity 290 define a projector tube 294 having a closed end 296 and an open end 298. The open end 298 is adjacent the base portion 286 of the body member 282 and the closed end 296 of the projector tube 294 is intermediate the forward portion 284 and base portion 286 of the body member 282. In the embodiment of the float 280 shown in FIG. 10 the walls 288 also define a forward cavity portion 300 extending from the forward portion 284 of the body member 282 to the closed end 296 of of the projector tube 294. A weight means 302 is coupled in the forward cavity portion 300 and has a preselected weight. The weight is selected so that, in preferred embodiments, the center of gravity 304 is at a distance equivalent to approximately one diameter or less from the forward end 284 of the body member 282 in order to provide appropriate aerodynamic stability during launch and ballistic trajectory thereof.

The length of the body member 282 from the forward portion 284 to the base portion 286 is approximately equivalent to at least four preselected diameters.

A bouyancy jacket 308 is coupled to the external surfaces of the body member 282 in regions adjacent the base portion 286 and has a forward end 310 that is spaced a distance approximately equivalent to two preselected diameters from the foward end 284 of the body member 282. The bouyancy jacket 308 may be a solid, such as cork or styrofoam, and the bouyancy thereof is selected to provide a total weight of the float 280 less than the weight of the water displaced thereby. the bouyancy jacket may also function as a drag ring for drag stabilization of the float 200.

Several alternative relationships for coupling bait to the float 280 may be utilized. For example, an eyelet 310 may be provided on the weight means 302 in the forward cavity portion 300. A bait line 312 may be coupled to the eyelet 310 and the bait 314 may be coupled thereto. During launch and ballistic trajectory, the bait 314 and bait line 312 are positioned in a bait storage portion 301 of the forward cavity portion 300. In general, the acceleration forces during launch to which the bait 314 is subjected are not sufficient to cause stripping of the bait 314, whether live or dead bait, from the hook when the bait is nestled in the forward cavity portion 300.

Alternatively, an eyelet 316 may be provided adjacent the forward end 310 of the bouyancy jacket 308 and a bait line 318 may be coupled thereto and wrapped around the body member 282 to secure live or dead bait 320 thereto during launch and ballistic trajectory. In this embodiment of securing the bait 320 to the float 280, the bait 320 is subjected to higher acceleration forces. In any event, for either configuration of the bait securing means, by either the eyelet 316 or the eyelet 310, after the float is in the water the bait extends outwardly therefrom the length of the bait line 318 or 312, respectively.

The fishing line to be cast 22 may be secured to the float 280 by means of a bale hook 322 coupled to the body member 282 at the base portion 286 thereof by means of eyelets 324. If desired, bait means such as bait means 326 may be secured to the fishing line 22 at a preselected distance from the bale hook 322 by means of a bait line 328 coupled thereto. The bait 326 thus secured by bait line 328 to the fishing line 22 may be subjected to comparatively high g forces during launch of the float 280. It will be appreciated that one or more methods of securing the bait to the float 280 may be utilized as desired.

The second walls 292 defining the projector tube 294 are slideably mountable on a projector spike such as projector spike 16 shown in FIG. 2 and launching of the float 280 may be accomplished as described above.

As noted above, the bouyancy jacket 308 may be a solid such as illustrated in FIG. or, alternatively, may be hollow as illustrated in FIG. 13. As shown in FIG. 13, there is a float generally designated 330 useful in the practice of the present invention that incorporated a bouyancy jacket 332 having walls 334 sealingly coupled to a body member 336 to define a hollow bouyancy chamber 338. The size of the bouyancy chamber 338 is selected to provide a total weight of the float 330 that is less than the weight of water displaced thereby.

The bouyancy jacket 308 or the bouyancy jacket 332 may generally have a forward end such as forward end 310 or forward end 340, respectively, that is substantially planar.

In order to achieve greater launching distances for a float in the practice of the present invention, it may, in some applications, be desirable to provide an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized float-configuration. FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate one embodiment of such an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized float useful in the practice of the present invention and generally designated 350. The aerodynamic float 350 has a body member 352 having first walls 354 defining a preselected external configuration and having a forward portion 356 and a base portion 358. The body member 352 also has internal walls 360 defining an internal cavity. Second walls 362 in the cavity 360 define a projector tube 364 having a closed end 366 spaced intermediate the forward portion 356 and base portion 358 of the body member 352. The projector tube 364 also has an open end 368 adjacent the base portion 358 of the body member 352 and communicates with regions external the body member 352.

The internals walls 356 also define a forward cavity portion 370 extending from the closed end 366 of the projector tube 264 to a planar forward section 372 of the forward portion 376. The preselected external configuration for the body member 352 in the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized float 350 is generally cylindn'cal about a longitudinal axis 374 and having a preselected diameter indicated by the letter D.

A weight means 376 is coupled to the body member 352 in the forward cavity portion 370 and has preselected weight. The preselected weight of the weight means 376 is selected to provide a center of gravity, indicated at 378, at a distance equivalent to or less than approximately one of the preselected diameters of the body member 376.

Various types of bait coupling means may be incorporated in the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized float shown in FIG. 11 and may be similar to those shown in FIG. 10. For example, the forward cavity portion 270 may also comprise a bait storage cavity portion 380 in which bait 382 connected to bait line 384 attached to eyelet means 386 coupled to weight means 386 is stored during launch and ballistic trajectory. Alternatively, the bait coupling means may comprise an eyelet 388 coupled to the body member 352 to which is attached a bait line 390 wrapped around the body member 352 to secure bait 392 closely adjacent to the body member 352 during launch and ballistic trajectory. In either of the above-mentioned types of bait coupling means, the bait is free to float away from the float after the float is in the water.

Since aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilization is desired, the first walls 354 of the body member 352 may also comprise an arcuate transition portion 394 to provide a rounded forward edge and a smooth transition from the planar forward portion 372 to the diameter D of the body member 352.

A bouyancy jacket 396 may be coupled to the first walls 354 on the external surface of the body member 352 and the bouyancy jacket 396 has a preselected volumetric displacement to provide that the total weight of the float 350 is less than the weight of the water displaced thereby. The bouyancy jacket 396 may be solid such as the bouyancy jacket 308 shown in FIG. 10 or hollow such as the bouyancy jacket 332 shown in FIG. 13. The bouyancy jacket 396 has base end 398 that is adjacent the base portion 358 of the body member 362 and an arcuate forward end 399 that is spaced a distance of approximately two diameters from the forward portion 356 of the body member 352. The arcuate forward end 399 of the bouyancy jacket 396 is desired for the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized configuration shown in FIG. 11.

In order to provide aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilization during launch and ballistic trajectory of the float 350 a plurality, for example three, aerodynamic fin means, such as aerodynamic fin means 400, 402 and 404 may be coupled to the first walls 354 of the body member 352 in regions adjacent the base portion 358 thereof. Each of the aerodynamic fin means 400, 402 and 404 extend a preselected distance towards the forward portion 356 of the body member 352 and, preferably, are canted approximately twelve degrees to the longitudinal axis 374 to provide proper fin plus spin stabilization.

The fishing line to be cast 22 may be coupled to the float 350 by means of, for example, bale hook 406 which may be similar to bale hook 322 shown in FIG. 10 and the bale hook 406 may be connected by means of eyelets 408 to the body member 352 at the base portion 358. Bait 410 may be coupled to the fishing line to be case 22 by means of bait line 412 at a predetermined spacing from the base portion 358 of the body member 352.

The projectile 18 of FIG. 1, as noted above, may also take the form of a sinker. FIG. 14 illustrates one embodiment of sinker projectile, generally designated 410 useful in the practice of the present invention.

As shown on FIG. 14, the sinker 410 is comprised of body member 412 having first walls 414 defining a preselected external configuration and having a forward portion 416 and a base portion 418. The body member 412 also has internal walls 420 defining an internal cavity 414. Second walls 422 in the internal cavity 421 defined by the internal walls 420 define a projector tube 424 having a closed end 426 spaced intermediate the forward portion 416 and base portion 418 of the body member 412. The projector tube 424 also has an open end 428 at the base portion 418 of the body member 412 and the projector tube 424 communicates with regions external the body member 412.

The internal walls 420 further define a forward cavity portion 430 extending from the forward portion 416 of the body member 412 to the closed end 426 of the projector tube 424. A weight means 432 is coupled in the forward cavity 430 and has a preselected weight.

In the embodiment of the sinker 410 shown in FIG. 14 the preselected external configuration is generally cylindrical about a longitudinal axis 434 and the body member 412 has a preselected diameter indicated by the letter D on FIG. 14. The weight of the preselected weight 432 is selected to provide a center of gravity, indicated at 436, that is spaced a distance equivalent to or less than approximately one preselected diameter from the forward portion 416. As shown on FIG. 14, the sinker 410 has a generally planar forward portion 416 and a generally planar base portion 418.

A drag ring means 438 is coupled to the first walls 414 of the body member 412 on the external surface thereof to provide aerodynamic drag stabilization of the sinker 410 and preferably is spaced a distance equivalent to approximately twice the preselected distance D from the forward portion 416.

In preferred embodiments of the sinker 410, for good aerodynamic drag stabilization, it has been found that the length of the sinker 410 between the planar forward portion 416 and the planar base portion 418 is preferably on the order of the distance equivalent to at least four times the preselected diameter D.

The fishing line to be cast 22 is coupled to the sinker 410 by means of a bale hook 440 that is coupled to the body member 412 in regions adjacent the base portion 418 thereof by means of eyelets 442.

Bait coupling means are also provided for carrying bait 444. In the embodiment shown on FIG. 14, the bait coupling means generally comprises a bait line 446 coupled to the fishing line to be cast 22 at predetermined distance from the base portion 418 of the body member 412, in a manner similar to that described above. The weight of the sinker 410, of course, is

greater than the weight of the water displaced thereby.

It will be appreciated that other types of bait coupling arrangements may be utilized with the sinker utilized in the practice of the present invention. For example, in FIG. 15 there is illustrated a sinker, generally designated 450, that is similar to the sinker 410 shown in FIG. 14 except that the drag ring 438 is provided with an aperture 452 therethrough. A bait line 454 is coupled to the drag ring 438' through the aperture 452 and may be wrapped around the sinker 450 to hold the bait 456 closely adjacent thereto during launch and ballistic trajectory thereof.

In the embodiment of a sinker shown in FIG. 16, and generally designated 460, there is provided another means for attaching the bait thereto. In FIG. 16, the sinker 460 is generally similar to the sinker 410 shown in FIG. 14 except that the forward cavity portion 430 thereof is provided with a bait storage portion 462 extending from the weight means 432', which may be similar to the weight means 432, to the planar forward portion 416'. Bait 464 may be coupled to a bait line 466 that is attached to an eyelet 468 on the weight 432 and the bait 464 and bait line 466 may be stored in the bait storage portion 462 during launch and ballistic trajectory thereof.

The drag ring 438 shown in FIG. 14 and the drag ring 438' shown in FIG. 15 as well as the drag ring utilized in the sinker 460 shown in FIG. 16 is preferably spaced a distance equivalent to approximately twice the preselected diameter D of the body member for proper aerodynamic drag stabilization thereof during launch and ballistic trajectory.

In some applications, wherein casting ranges and/or heavier sinkers are desired in the configuration of the projectile 18, it is desirable to provide an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized sinker arrangement. One embodiment of an aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized sinker utilized as the projectile 18 is illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18 and is generally designated 480.

As shown on FIGS. 17 and 18, the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized sinker 480 is comprised of a body member 482 having first walls 484 defining a preselected external configuration, which, for the embodiment shown, is generally cylindrical having a preselected diameter indicated by the letter D on FIG. 17 and having a longitudinal axis 486. The body member 482 has a forward portion 488 and a planar base portion 490. Internal walls 492 define an internal cavity 491 and second walls 494 in the internal cavity define a.projector tube 496 having a closed end 498 spaced intermediate the forward position 488 and base portion 490 of the boty member 482 and an open end 500 adjacent the base portion 490 and communicating with regions external the body member 482.

A weight means 502 is coupled in a forward cavity portion 504 of the internal cavity 491 and the weight means 502 has an arcuate nose portion 506 which, in preferred embodiments of the present invention, may be ogive. The weight means 502 has a predetermined weight selected to provide the proper aerodynamic balance during launch and ballistic trajectory as well as providing a weight of the sinker 480 greater than the weight of water displaced thereby and the weight means 502, as shown in FIG. 17, extends to regions forward and external of the forward cavity portion 504.

A plurality of aerodynamic canted fin means such as the three aerodynamic fin means 508, 510 and 512 are coupled to the first walls 484 of the body member 482 in regions adjacent the base portion and extend forwardly towards the forward portion 488 a preselected distance. For proper fin plus spin stabilization called aero-gyro stability the center of pressure (c.p.) of the projectile must be aft of the projectile center of gravity (g) and the spin rate must be an order of magnitude larger than the yaw frequency of the projectile with no spin. To obtain satisfactory aero-gyro stability the time to spin-up should be 0.3 seconds or less. Therefore the number, and size, and cant angles on the fins must be adjusted to the projectile polar and transverse moments of inertia and launch velocity. In general, the number of fins may be, for example, on the order of three to eight and the angle of cant on the order of 2 to 20. However, for illustrative purposes, the drawing herein generally shows three fins canted at 12, which is satisfactory for a projectile of three to seven ounces and a launch velocity of I50 ft/sec.

The fishing line to be cast 22 is coupled to the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized sinker 480 by, for example, a bale hook means 514 that is coupled to the first walls 484 of the body member 482 by means of eyelets 516 adjacent the base portion 490 thereof. Bait coupling means such as eyelets 518 coupled to the first walls 484 intermediate the forward portion 488 and base portion 490 of the body member 482 may be provided for coupling a bait line 520 thereto that is wrapable around the body member 482 to secure bait 522 closely adjacent thereto during launch and ballistic trajectory. Alternatively, the bait coupling means may be provided by a bait line 524 coupled to bait 526 and to the fishing line to be case 22 in a preselected spaced relationship from the bale hook 514.

The second walls 494 defining the projector tube 496 are slideably mountable on projector tube 16 and launching of the aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized sinker is achieved in the manner described above.

It will be appreciated that in those embodiments of projectile arrangements 18 described above the bait may be live'bait, dead bait or a lure.

In certain applications of the present application, it has been found that the acceleration loading during launch of the projective may be quite high. For example, on the order of 1,000 to 3,000 gs. Such high acceleration loadings may, in some instances, tend to strip the bait from the bait hook when the full acceleration loads are imposed thereon. Therefore, it has been found desirable in such applications to limit the load imposed by acceleration forces on the bait to a range of, for example, 50 gs to 200 gs.

Similarly, to prevent breaking the line to be cast, the load limiter described below may also be advantageously utilized in embodiments of the present invention other than fishing applications.

FIGS. 19, 20 and 21 illustrate one type of load limiting arrangement, generally designated 530, useful in the practice of the present invention to reduce the acceleration loads imposed upon the bait (or line to be cast) during launch of the projectile 18. The structure illustrated in FIGS. 19, 20 or 21 may be utilized in those applications wherein the bait coupling means comprises means for coupling the bait to the fishing line a preselected spaced relationship from the base portion of the projectile 18 and is combined with the fishing line coupling means for attaching the fishing line to the projectile 18.

The projectile 18 shown in FIG. 19 may be any type of projectile utilized in the present invention and may be a sinker, a float, drag stabilized, aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized or the like. A brake 532 is slideably mounted on a brake line 534 coupled by a brake line comprising means 536 to the projectile 18. The brake line coupling means 536 may comprise a bale hook 538 coupled to the projectile 18 by eyelets 540 on the base portion 542 thereof and a swivel 544, which, in preferred embodiments is a ball bearing swivel, connected to the bale hook 538 by forward line 546. The swivel 544 is coupled to a first end 548 of the brake line 534. A lightweight stop means 550 is coupled to a second end 552 of the brake line 534. The brake 532 is adapted to slide with a predetermined frictional force on the brake line 534 in the direction indicated by the arrow 554 until it encounters the stop means 550. The frictional force is related to the weight of the projectile 18 and may be selected to achieve a 0.50 to 1.50 g force.

A connecting line 556 has a first end 558 connected to the brake 532 and a second end 560 connected to a T swivel 562. A bait line 564 is connected to the T swivel 562 and to the bait 566. The bait 566 may be live bait or dead bait, as desired.

In some embodiments of the load limiting arrangement 530 wherein live bait is utilized a bait holder means 568 may be connected by line 570 to the T swivel 562 and the fishing line to be cast 22is connected to the bait holder 568. If the bait holder 568 is not utilized, the line 22 is connected directly to the T swivel 562 and line 570 is omitted.

During launch, the bait 566 may be supported in the bait holder 568 as shown in dotted lines in FIG. 19, if the bait holder 568 is utilized. After the projectile 18 is in the water the bail floats free of the bail holder means 568 to the position shown in solid lines on FIG. 19.

As shown in FIG. 19 the bait holder 568 may comprise a tapered, tubular body member 572 having internal walls 574 defining the bait supporting cavity 576. The bait holder 566 may be fabricated of plastic, sheet metal or any other desired materials suitable for the purpose. Further, the particular configuration of the tapered tubular bait holder 568 illustrated in FIG. 19 is presented for illustrative purposes only and it will be appreciated that many forms and variations of the bait holder 568 may be utilized in the present invention.

One embodiment of a brake 532 is illustrated in detail in FIGS. 20 and 21. As shown thereon, the brake 532 generally comprises a rigid outer casing 578 having walls 580 defining a core cavity 582. A core member 584 is positioned within the core cavity 582 and is coupled to the rigid outer casing 578. The core member 584 has friction walls 586 defining a brake line receiving aperture 588 extending through from a first end 590 of the brake 532 to a second end 592 thereof. The friction walls 586 engage the brake line 534 with a preselected frictional force for movement of the brake 532 in the direction indicated by the arrow 544. The core member 584 may be fabricated of, for example, hard rubber or other suitable material and the rigid outer casing 578'may be composed of metal or the like. To provide the preselected frictional force between the core member 584 and the brake line 534 the brake 532 may be crimped and/or squeezed down to compress the rubber against the brake line 534 until the desired frictional force therebetween is obtained.

In preferred fishing embodiments the length of the forward line 546 is longer than the length of the brake line 534 to prevent fouling. The forward line 546 also, preferably provides resiliency in torsion so that an antitorque effect is achieved to prevent the spinning projectile 18 from winding the line to be cast 22. The brake line 534 is shown in FIG. 19 in the launch position.

FIG. 22 and 23 illustrate another embodiment of a brake generally designated 600 useful in the practice of the present invention. As shown, the brake 600 can provide a variable friction force and has a rigid tubular body 602 provided with a pair of guides 604 and 606 coupled therein. The brake line 534 passes through the guides 604 and 606.

A pair of friction members 608 and 610 are retained in the body member 602 and have friction surfaces 612 and 614, respectively, engaging the brake line 534. Rubber bands 616 (omitted in FIG. 23 for clarity) squeeze the friction members against brake line 534 with an adjustable friction force. Adjustment is achieved by varying the tension in the rubber bands 616.

It will be appreciated that any other type of clamping arrangement may equally well be utilized to provide the clamping force of the friction members 608 and 610 on the brake line 534.

FIG. 24 illustrates another embodiment of a brake means, generally designated 620, useful in the practice of the present invention. As shown, the brake 620 generally comprises a helix means 622 slideably mounted on the brake line 534 to provide a predetermined frictional force therebetween. The inside diameter of the helix means 622 is smaller than the external diameter of the brake line 534 and thereby frictionally engages the brake line 534. The internal diameter of the helix means 622 may be selected, with respect to any given diameter of the brake lines 534, to provide any degree of sliding frictional force therebetween. In this embodiment of the brake 620, the frictional force is not variable but is fixed and dependent upon the relative diameters of the helix means 622 and the brake line 534. The connecting line 556 is connected directly to the helix means 622 on a hook portion 624 thereof.

It will be appreciated that, in utilization of any of the brake means described herein, in those embodiments of the invention wherein it is utilized for line casting other than for fishing, the connecting line 556 may be connected directly to the line to be case 22. Thus, the bail and/or bait holder may be eliminated and the line to be cast 22 may be considered connected directly to the brake means. In such embodiments, the connecting line 556 is merely an extension of the line to be cast 22.

FIG. 25 and 26 illustrate another embodiment of the a brake means, generally designated 630, useful in the practice of the present invention. As shown, the brake means 630 comprises a pair of rigid body members 632 and 634. The body member 632 has a first end 636 defining a boss 638 having walls 640 defining a brake line receiving aperture therethrough for receiving the brake line 534. The member 632 has a second end 642 spaced from the first end 636 and second walls 644 defining a tapered surface between the boss and the second end 642. The body member 632 also has third wall 646 defining friction surfaces for frictionally engaging the brake line 534.

The second body member 634 has a first end 648 defining a boss 650 as well as a line attachment means 652 for attachment to the connecting line 556. A second end 654 of the body member 634 is spaced from the first end 648 and the body member 634 is provided with second walls 656 defining an external tapered surface extending between the first end 648 and second end 654. The second walls 656 of the body member 634 and second walls 644 of the body member 632 together define a tapered generally frusto-conical assembly.

The external surface 644 of the member 632 is provided with a helical groove 658 and the external surface 656 of the body member 634 provided with a matching helical groove 660. A resilient helical clamping member 662, such as a spring, may be positioned in the helical grooves 658 and 660 to squeeze the friction surface 646 of the body member 632 and the friction surface 664 of the body member 634 towards each other to provide the frictional force on the line 534. As the resilient helical clamping means 662 is threadingly moved further towards the larger end of the pair of body members 632 and 634 comprising the front end 636 of member 632 and the second end 654 of member 634, the frictional force on the brake line 534 is increased. Thus, this embodiment of the brake 630 provides a variable frictional force on the brake line 534. The boss 650 of the second member 634 is also provided with walls 666 defining a brake line receiving aperture through which the brake line 534 extends.

In the brake 620 shown in FIG. 24 and the brake 630 shown in FIG. 26, the stop means 550 at the second end 552 of the brake line 534 is generally comprised of a loop formed in the brake line 534 to prevent the brake from sliding off of the brake line 534.

FIG. 27 illustrates another embodiment, generally designated 670, of a brake useful in the practice of the present invention. In this embodiment of the brake 670, there is provided a resilient disc means 672 having first walls 674 defining a first brake line receiving aperture 676 and second walls 678 defining a second brake line receiving aperture 680. The first walls 674 and second walls 678 generally define the frictional surfaces for frictionally engaging the brake line 534 and are spaced a preselected distance apart. An intermediate portion 534 of the brake line 534 extends continuously from the first aperture 676 to the second aperture 678 and is provided with loop defining means 682 in a preferred embodiment of the brake 670. The loop defining means takes the form of a member 684 having a first aperture 686 and a second aperture 688 therethrough and through both of which the brake line 534 extends. The loop portion 690 may be utilized to grasp the brake line 534 conveniently when it is desired to reset the brake 670 after the resilient disc 672 has moved in the direction of the arrow 692 towards the loop 690 during launch. The connecting line 556 may be considered an extension of the brake line 534 and, as noted above, may be connected directly to the line to be case 22.

Resilient members 694, such as rubber bands, may be placed in a groove 696 on the outer surface 698 of the resilient disc 672 in order to provide a variable frictional force on the brake line 534. Thus, the resilient members 694 provide a clamping means for engaging the disc means 672 to vary the friction force on the brake line 534 imposed by the friction walls 674 and 678.

Thus, as described above, it can be seen that brake means suitable for utilization in the practice of the present invention may include brakes in which the friction force is fixed and those in which the friction force is variable. Further, depending upon the particular application of the present invention, the line to be cast may be connected directly to the brake means or intermediate structure such as belt connecting arrangements may be utilized.

As noted above, in connection with the description of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, it may be desirable, in some applications, to provide a safety such as the safety catch, generally designated 71, in FIG. 2. This safety catch 71, it will be appreciated, operates by retaining the actuator weights 78 in a fixed position when it is adjacent the detent 73 by insertion of the plunger 75 therein. When the plunger is withdrawn from the actuator weight 73 and the actuator weight is rotated slightly about the shaft means 14, the plunger 75 is no longer aligned with the detent 73 and thus is free to strike the poppet valve 52. In some application, however, it may be desired to provide a more complete safety catch arrangement in which inadvertent raising of the actuator weight is prevented and inadvertent depressing of the poppet valve 52 by the actuator weight 78 is also prevented.

FIG. 28 illustrates an embodiment of a safety catch means, generally designated 700, that provides structure for preventing the inadvertent lifting of the actuator weight 78' which, in general, may be similar to the actuator weight 78 on the shaft means 72' which, in general, may be similar to the shaft means 72, as well as preventing inadvertent depression of the stem 56 of the poppet valve 52, that is coupled to the pressure vessel 12.

As shown in FIG. 28, the shaft means 72' is provided with first walls 704 defining a groove 706 extending around the shaft means 72'. The first walls 704 are spaced a preselected distance from the stem means 56 so that, for the condition of actuator weight means 78 aligned therewith, the lower surface 78" thereof is free of contact with the stem 56. The first walls 704 defining the groove 706 has radially extending upper wall portions 708 and downwardly tapered lower wall portions 710. The first walls 704 also have axially extending portions 712 between the radially extending wall portions 708 and downwardly tapered wall portions 710.

A spring loaded first latch means 714 is pivotally mounted on a pivot pin 716 in a cavity 718 defined by walls 720 of the actuator weight means 78'. The first latch means 714 has an engagement portion 722 that is extendable into groove 706 when the first latch means 714 is in a first position corresponding to the actuator weight means 78' aligned with the groove 706 as shown in FIG. 28. The engagement portion 722 is movable from the groove 706 for other positions of the actuator weight 78'. The engagement portion 722 has an upper surface 724 that extends substantially radially in the first position above described with respect to the shaft means 72' and downwardly tapered lower surface 726 that is adapted to slidingly engage the downwardly tapered wall portion 710 of the groove 706. The radially extending upper portion 724 of the first latch means 714, in the first position, abutts the radially extending upper wall portion 718 of the groove 706. If the actuator weight 78' were to be moved upwardly it thereby prevents movement of the actuator weight 78' past the groove 706. A spring means 728 in the cavity 718 engages the actuator weight means 78' and yieldingly urges the spring loaded first latch means 714 into the first position shown on FIG. 28.

When it is desired to raise the actuator weight 78' to regions above the groove means 706, the outer portion 730 of the first latch means 714 may be depressed downwardly in the direction indicated by the arrow 732 against the force of spring means 728. Such movement pivots the first latch means 714 about the pivot arm 716 upwardly in the direction of the arrow 734 to move the engagement portion 722 out of the groove means 706. The actuator weight means 78' may then be raised to any desired height on the shaft means 72'.

The actuator weight 78' may be released when it is desired to operate the structure and moves in the direction of gravity, as indicated by the arrow 732. The engagement portion of the first latch means 714 slides against the external surface 72" of the shaft means 72' into the groove means 706 and past the groove means 706 as the downwardly tapered surface 726 engages the downwardly tapered portion 710 of the groove means 706.

In order to prevent depression of the stem means 56, in the event that the actuator weight means 78' is inadvertently released or moved downwardly when it is not desired to actuate the control valve 52, a second latch 740 is provided. The second latch 740 comprises a generally L-shaped second latch means 742 pivotally mounted on a support bracket means 744 positioned at a predetermined location intermediate the groove 706 and the pressure vessel means 12. The L-shaped second latch means 742 has an upright portion 746 and a leg portion 748 and is pivotally movable on pivot pin 750 from a first, or safe position, shown in dotted lines in FIG. 28, to a second, or fire position, shown in solid lines on FIG. 28. In the first, or safe position, the upright portion 746 extends vertically towards the actuator weight 78 a greater distance from the pressure vessel 12 than the top of the stem 56 of the control valve 52 and the topsurface 752 thereof engages the lower surface 78" of the actuator weight 78 in the first or safe position to prevent the actuator weight 78' from contacting the stem 56. A ball detent (not shown in FIG. 28 for clarity) may be provided on the support bracket 744 to yieldingly retain the L-shaped second latch means 742 in the second or fire position.

The L-shaped second latch means 742 is manually movable from the first or safe position, shown in dotted lines on FIG. 28, to the second or fire position, shown in solid lines in FIG. 28. In the second or fire position the leg portions 748 of the L-shaped second latch means 742 protrudes upwardly and has an end surface 754 that engages the lower surface 78" of the actuator weight 78 when the actuator weight 78 is moving downwardly towards the stem 56 of the control valve 52. Leg portion 748 is spaced outwardly from the pivot pin 750 so that the force of the actuator weight means 78 contacting the surface 754 pivots the L-shaped second latch means 742 out of contact with the ball detent and towards the safe position. A torque spring 756 may be provided on the pivot pin 750 to yieldingly hold the second latch means 742 in the safe or first position. When the spring in the control valve 52 forces the stem 56 upwardly the actuator weight 78' is returned to the position shown in FIG. 28 with the first latch means 714 positioned in the groove 706 and the second L- shaped latch means 742 under the influence of torque spring 756 in the first or safe position.

This concludes the description of the preferred embodiments of the present invention. As noted above, the invention contemplates not only an improved overall powered line casting arrangement but provides a new and improved structure for launching a projectile to which a line to be cast is attached. Also, new and improved structural arrangements for providing the energy necessary to launch the projectile and, in fishing applications, new and improved projectiles comprising lures, floats and/or sinkers and which may be drag stabilized or aerodynamic fin plus spin stabilized has been described. A load limiting structure for limiting the acceleration loads during launch that may be imposed during the launch of the projectile has also been described.

The following claims are intended to cover all variations and adaptations of the structure heretofore described and falling within the true scope and spirit of the present invention.

We claim:

1. A line casting arrangement comprising, in combination:

a source of pressurized fluid:

a tubular projector spike having a preselected length coupled to said source of pressurized fluid and having a fluid inlet end, a fluid discharge end, internal walls defining a fluid passageway extending from said fluid inlet end to said fluid discharge end, and external walls defining a projector tube engaging surface;

control means coupled to said source of pressurized fluid and to said tubular discharge spike for selectively controlling the flow of pressurized fluid from said source of pressurized fluid into said fluid passageway of said projector spike: projectile removably mountable on said tubular projector spike, and said projectile comprising: body member having first walls defining a preselected external configuration and having a planar forward portion and planar base portion, and said body member having: first internal walls defining a projector tube having a closed end intermediate said forward portion of said body member and said base portion and an open end adjacent said base portion of said body member and communicating with regions external said body means; and said projector tube slideably mountable on said external walls of said projector spike, and said closed end of said projector tube positionable adjacent said fluid discharge end of said projector spike; line coupling means for coupling the line to be cast to said projectile, and comprising:

a brake line having a first end coupled to said projectile and a second end spaced a preselected distance therefrom;

a brake means slideably mounted on said brake for sliding therealong from said first end toward said second end with a predetermined frictional force therebetween;

stop means for limiting the travel of said brake means on said brake line; and

the line to be cast coupled to said brake means;

a supply of the line to be cast spaced from source of pressurized fluid, and said supply of the line to be cast free of connection to said source of pressurized fluid, said supply of the line to be cast comprising means for dispensing the line to be cast for the condition of said projectile launched from sid projector tube;

whereby actuation of said control means allows pressurized fluid from said source of pressurized fluid to enter said fluid passageway of said projector spike from said inlet end thereof, and to discharge from said discharge end thereof into said projector tube for launching said projectile to regions remote said source of pressurized fluid.

2. The arrangement defined in claim 1 wherein:

said source of pressurized fluid comprises a solid propellant charge means for providing a gas under pressure for the condition of said charge means ignited;

said control means comprises means for igniting said solid propellant charge means.

3. The arrangement defined in claim 1 wherein:

said line to be cast is a fishing line and further comprises:

bait coupling means for coupling bait to said projectile;

and said pressurized fluid control means comprising:

a valve means for controlling flow of pressurized fluid from said source of pressurized fluid;

vertically extending shaft means adjacent said valve means; and

slide means slideably mounted on said shaft means for movement under gravity forces to actuate said valve means and release a predetermined amount of pressurized fluid therefrom.

4. The arrangement defined in claim 1 wherein:

said line to be cast is a fishing line and said line coupling means for coupling the fishing line to be cast to said projectile further comprises:

brake line coupling means coupled to said projectile for coupling said brake line thereto:

said brake line having a preselected length between said first end coupled to said brake line coupling means and said second end;

said stop means coupled to said second end of said brake line for stopping motion of said brake means for the condition of said brake means adjacent thereto;

a connecting line having a first end coupled to said brake, and a second end;

a bait line having a first end coupled to said second end of said connecting line and a second end coupled to bait;

and the fishing line to be cast attachable to said second end of said connecting line.

5. The arrangement defined in claim 4 wherein:

said brake means comprises:

a rigid outer casting having walls defining a core cava core member coupled to said outer casing in said core cavity and having friction walls defining a brake line receiving aperture therethrough and said friction walls engaging said brake line with said preselected frictional force;

said brake line coupling means comprises:

a bale hook coupled to said projectile;

a forward line having a first end coupled to said bale hook and having a second end, and having a preselected length greater than said preselected length of said brake line;

a swivel coupled to said second end of said forward line, and said brake line coupled to said swivel.

6. The arrangement defined in claim and further comprising:

a bait holder means coupled to said second end of said connecting line for supporting the bait during launch of said projectile; and

said fishing line to be cast attachable to said bait holder means.

7. The arrangement defined in claim 1 wherein:

said line coupling means further comprises:

a bale hook coupled to said projectile;

a forward line having a first end coupled to said bale hook, a second end and a preselected length therebetween;

a swivel, and said second end of said forward line connected to said swivel;

said brake line having said first end coupled to said swivel and said preselected distance is less than said preselected length of said forward line.

8. The arrangement defined in claim 5 and further comprising:

a T swivel;

said second end of said connecting line coupled to said T swivel; and

said fishing line to be cast is coupled to said T swivel.

9. The arrangement defined in claim 1 wherein:

said projectile comprises a lure and said first walls thereof define a generally fish-head configuration having an arcuate forward portion and a substantially planar base portion;

base means coupled to said first walls for closing said portion; and

said base means having walls defining an aperture therethrough for providing communcation with said internal cavity;

said open end of said projector tube aligned with said aperture in said base means of said projectile.

10. The arrangement defined in claim 9 wherein:

said line coupling means further comprises an eyelet coupled to said first walls of said projectile in regions adjacent said base portion thereof; and

fishing hook means coupled to said projectile in regions spaced from said base means.

11. A line casting arrangement comprising, in combination:

a source of pressurized fluid;

a tubular projector spike having a preselected length coupled to said source of pressurized fluid and having a fluid inlet end, a fluid discharge end, internal walls defining a fluid passageway extending from said fluid inlet end to said fluid discharge end, and external walls defining a projector tube engaging surface;

control means coupled to said source of pressurized fluid and to said tubular discharge spike for selectively controlling the flow of pressurized fluid from said source of pressurized fluid into said fluid passageway of said projector spike;

a projectile removably mountable on said tubular projector spike, and said projectile comprising:

a body member having first walls defining a preselected external configuration and having a planar forward portion and a planar base portion, and said body member having: internal walls defining a projector tube having a closed end intermediate said forward portion of said body member and said base portion and an open end adjacent said base portion of said body member and communicating with regions external said body means; and said projector tube slideably mountable on said external walls of said projector spike, and said closed end of said projector tube positionable adjacent said fluid discharge end of said projector spike;

second internal walls defining a forward cavity extending from said forward portion of said body member to said closed end of said projector tube and said forward cavity communicating with regions external said body member;

said preselected external configuration of said first walls is substantially cylindrical having a preselected diameter and a longitudinal axis;

weight means coupled to said body member in said forward cavity and having a preselected weight; and said projectile further comprising bait coupling means for coupling bait to said body members;

line coupling means for coupling the line to be cast to said projectile;

a brake line having a first end coupled to said projectile and a second end spaced a preselected distance therefrom; a

a brake means slideably mounted on said brake for sliding therealong from said first end toward said second end with a predetermined frictional force therebetween;

stop means for limiting the travel of said brake means on said brake line; and

the line to be cast coupled to said brake means;

a supply of the line to be cast spaced from said source of pressurized fluid, and said supply of the line to be cast free of connection to said source of pressurized fluid, said supply of the line to be cast comprising means for dispensing the line to be cast for the condition of said projectile launched from said projector tube;

whereby actuation of said control means allows pressurized fluid from said source of pressurized fluid to enter said fluid passageway of said projector spike from said inlet end thereof, and to discharge from said discharge end thereof into said projector tube for launching said projectile to regions remote said source of pressurized fluid.

12. The arrangement defined in claim 11 and further comprising:

drag ring means coupled to said first walls of said body member and spaced from said planar forward portion thereof a distance equivalent approximately twice said preselected diameter;

said preselected weight of said weight means selected to provide a center of gravity of said projectile at a predetermined position located and between said planar forward portion and a distance equivalent to approximately one of said preselected diameter therefrom;

said projectile has a length in the longitudinal direction between said planar forward portion and said

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4566217 *Apr 6, 1982Jan 28, 1986Geary Sr NelseBait casting device and method
US5060413 *Nov 14, 1988Oct 29, 1991Garcia Manuel EFishing line launching device
US7409794 *Sep 19, 2005Aug 12, 2008Daniel TrianoFishing line casting and bait projectile system
US7694452 *Aug 27, 2007Apr 13, 2010Croisetiere Leo RBait launcher
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US8499486 *Feb 10, 2011Aug 6, 2013Mark ThomsenPropelling device for bait and lures
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US20150230445 *Jul 20, 2012Aug 20, 2015Arwe FotlandDevice for fishing object ejection
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Classifications
U.S. Classification43/19, 43/42.35
International ClassificationA01K91/02, A01K91/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01K91/02
European ClassificationA01K91/02