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Publication numberUS3834567 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateAug 8, 1972
Priority dateAug 8, 1972
Publication numberUS 3834567 A, US 3834567A, US-A-3834567, US3834567 A, US3834567A
InventorsMiller J
Original AssigneeMiller J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adapter apparatus for tractor
US 3834567 A
Abstract
An adapter apparatus for the conventional bucket of a tractor or high lift which converts the conventional bucket thereof to a special purpose bucket having a plurality of prongs which handle loose barnyard fertilizer or hay.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Miller [451 Sept. 10, 1974 ADAPTER APPARATUS FOR TRACTOR [76] Inventor: I Joseph Miller, 812 Allyn St., Akron,

Ohio 44311 [22] Filed: Aug. 8, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 278,709

[52] US. Cl. 214/145 [51] Int. Cl E02f 3/70 [58] Field of Search 214/145, 750, 620, 131 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,419,493 4/1947 110a 214/780 2,446,827 8/1948 Hall 214/145 2,496,563 2/1950 Siems 214/145 3,325,023 6/1967 Coleman 214/145 3,349,933 10/1967 Simpson 3,706,388 12/1972 Westendorf FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 163,010 5/1955 Australia 214/780 Primary Examiner-Robert G. Sheridan Assistant Examiner-John Mannix [57] ABSTRACT An adapter apparatus for the conventional bucket of a tractor or high lift which converts the conventional bucket thereof to a special purpose bucket having a plurality of prongs which handle loose barnyard fertilizer or hay.

3 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures ADAPTER APPARATUS FOR TRACTOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an adapter apparatus for use with a high lift bucket and more particularly to an adapter apparatus which converts the conventional bucket of a high lift or the bucket of the usual farm tractor to do a specialized job for lifting and loading loose materials such as barnyard fertilizer or hay.

In the use of high lifts and farm tractors for conventional purpose work, the design has been such as to emphasize utility and applicability; however, it has become the practice to use these devices for as many odd jobs as possible to enhance their usefulness. In order to provide greater adaptability, manufacturers of high lifts and farm tractors have designed special use buckets which require the removal of one bucket and the mounting of the special purpose bucket. After such special use, it is necessary to again reverse buckets, which requires time, energy, and the expense of maintaining at least two buckets and their storage. The changing of the buckets is not an easy task. One special bucket which manufacturers have provided is one with long prongs which are useful in the handling of loose materials such as barnyard fertilizer. In the case of such loose materials, the conventional bucket is ineffective to pick up loose materials since the straw throughout interferes with its effective pick-up by the straight edges of the bucket. The weight of such loose material is sufficiently light that an ordinary bucket just pushes it and cannot effectively pick it up.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed to an adapter appa-' ratus that is inexpensive to fabricate yet rapidly converts the conventional bucket of a farm tractor or high lift to a special purpose bucket. The adapter comprises a plate member that is conveniently connected to the conventional bucket, which plate member has a plurality of spaced prongs which extend outwardly away from the bucket when the plate member is firmly secured to the edge of the bucket.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is an isometric view of the bucket adapter apparatus of a preferred embodiment of the invention, with the bucket shown in dot and dash lines;

FIG. 2 is, a cross-sectional .view of the bucket adapter apparatus taken on lines 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 illustrates a modification of the adapter apparatus;

FIG. 4 illustrates a further modification of the adapter apparatus.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1 a coventional bucket of a farm tractor or high lift in phantom lines having a rear wall 11, side walls 12 and a bottom wall I3.'Such bucket 10 is of conventional shape and can be removably mounted to the lever members of a tractor which manipulates the bucket in its operation.

The adapter apparatus which can be attached to such conventional bucket includes a fiat plate member 15 prongs 16, although more or less of these prongs may be used. The rear portion of each prong 16 is bifurcated, providing a slot 17 which facilitates the attachment and support of the adapter to the bottom wall 13 of the bucket. The rearward portion of each prong 16 has a bore which is in alignment with a bore on the bot tom wall 13 of the bucket, such that a threaded bolt or stud 19 extending therethrough facilitates the securing of these parts together. The forward portion of each prong l6 tapers to a point 18. Suitably secured to the plate member 15 are a plurality of additional prongs 20, which prongs 20 are similar in all respects to prongs 16 except that their rearwardly disposed bifurcated portion extends rearwardly sufficiently to have their rear edges 21 flush with the rearwardly most edge of the plate member 15. The forwardmost portion of prongs 20 terminate into a point 18 as prongs 16. Such prongs 20 may have their bifurcated portion extend rearwardly sufficiently to engage the upper and lower surface of bottom wall 13 to provide additional support to the bucket adapter apparatus.

In the use of the adapter apparatus, assuming the conventional bucket is mounted on the tractor, an operator slips the bifurcated prongs onto the bottom wall 13 of the bucket until the plate member 15 abuttingly engages the lip or front edge of the bucket 10. Bolts 19 or other suitable connecting means are used to interconnect the adapter apparatus with the bucket. The prongs 20 and 16, as an example, may extend from 10 to 18 inches beyond the plate member 15 outwardly away therefrom.

A modification of the bucket adapter apparatus is to have the prongs V- or L-shaped in cross section or an angle iron as shown in FIG. 3 with the one wall portion 33 extending vertically upwardly and normal to the other wall portion of the prong. Herein the long prongs 30 and the short prongs 31 can be welded or otherwise secured to the plate member 32 with the one vertically extending wall 33 of the end prongs 30 lying in abutting contact with the side wall 12 of the bucket 10 such that this combination cooperates to penetrate cleanly into the mass of material being loaded, cutting the straw which thereby facilitates the loading action. The advantage of the long prongs 30, 31, 16 and: 20 is that they can triple the load worked over a conventional bucket if such bucket were able to load the loose material thereon. The prongs 30 have suitable bores 34 for registering with similar bores on the bottom wall of a bucket and for receiving a bolt or stud to interconnect the tractor bucket adaptertothe bucket. A further modification is shown in FIG. 4 wherein the longitudinally extending prongs 35 are T-shaped in cross section and suitably connected to the plate member 36. In addition to the plurality of elongated members 35, a plurality of laterally spaced prongs 37 are similarly suitably connected to the plate member 36, The elongated prongs 35 have bores 38 suitably drilled into the rearward portion thereof to provide means for interconnecting such adapter to the conventional bucket as depicted in FIG. 1.

Various modifications are contemplated and may obviously be resorted to by those skilled in the art without departing from the described invention, as hereinafter defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An adapter apparatus for use with a conventional bucket having side walls, back wall and a bottom wall presenting an open end bucket; comprising an elongated thin support member with spaced end portions and a longitudinally extending edge portion with said edge portion being positioned for abutting contact to the front edge of the bottom wall of a bucket; a plurality of prong members secured to said support member and extending outwardly away from the bottom wall; said prong members lying in spaced parallel relationship with the respective outermost prong members lying at the respective end portions of said support member and having their rearwardly disposed side portions in abutting contact with said side walls of the bucket; certain ones of said prong members extending rearwardly from said support member and having portions that lie in abutting contact with the bottom wall of said bucket; the remaining ones of said prong members having their rearwardlymost portion secure to said elongated support member; and means for connecting said certain ones of said prong members to the bottom wall of a bucket.

2. An adapter apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein said rearwardly extending portions of said certain ones of said prongs are bifurcated for contacting the upper and lower surfaces of the bottom wall.

3. An adapter apparatus for use with the conventional bucket of a tractor comprising an elongated narrow support member having a longitudinally extending planar surface for abutting contact to the edge of the bucket, said support member having a plurality of prongs extending at right angles outwardly therefrom, said outwardly extending prongs being elongated members tapering to a point, certain ones of said prongs having bifurcated portions extending rearwardly from said support member in a direction opposite to said outwardly extending direction, and connecting means on said rearwardly extending bifurcated portions of said certain ones of said prongs for interconnecting said certain prongs to the bucket.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2419493 *Jun 20, 1945Apr 22, 1947Hoff John MarkFarm loader
US2446827 *Jan 29, 1946Aug 10, 1948Olson Mfg CompanyScoop and trip mechanism therefor
US2496563 *Jun 12, 1947Feb 7, 1950George SiemsExtension for material handling scoops
US3325023 *Jul 19, 1965Jun 13, 1967Coleman Joseph EScoop fork
US3349933 *Dec 27, 1965Oct 31, 1967Simpson Edward FPavement lifter
US3706388 *Jan 21, 1971Dec 19, 1972Westendorf Walter JFork attachment for a loader bucket
AU163010A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3921837 *Feb 12, 1975Nov 25, 1975Lloyd L VandewaterRound bale handling attachment for a tractor
US4056205 *Oct 22, 1975Nov 1, 1977Etzler Iv John LewisLoader attachment
US4125952 *Oct 13, 1977Nov 21, 1978Jennings Willie LBucket attachment
US4275985 *Apr 12, 1979Jun 30, 1981Schremmer Stanley MHay bale handling device
US4729180 *May 7, 1986Mar 8, 1988Hendricks Robert GQuick teeth bucket attachment
US5425189 *Jan 14, 1994Jun 20, 1995Anderson; Kenneth C.Method and apparatus for raking with heavy equipment
US5515625 *Jul 14, 1994May 14, 1996Hydroseed Manufacturing, IncorporatedRake attachment with scarifying teeth for a skid steer
US6092606 *Feb 19, 1998Jul 25, 2000Basler; Jeffrey L.Stone gathering apparatus
US6230424 *Dec 8, 1998May 15, 2001Caterpillar Inc.Base edge protection assembly for an implement of a work machine
US6290451Jul 14, 1999Sep 18, 2001Jason Tory IhmUtility implement projection and retraction assembly
US6360458 *Oct 26, 1999Mar 26, 2002Farmers' Factory CompanyRake attachment for skid steer loaders and front end loaders and method for converting a loader bucket into a lawn preparation tool
US6363633Dec 23, 1998Apr 2, 2002Diane HolzerExcavating implement
US6434865 *Dec 22, 2000Aug 20, 2002Caterpillar Inc.Base edge protection assembly for an implement of a work machine
US6578297 *Jul 21, 2000Jun 17, 2003Craig H. ForsbergSkid steer attachment, sub-attachment system having extended reach
US6718662May 1, 2003Apr 13, 2004Timothy SchaffDo-all rake-tooth bucket extension attachment
US6892824 *Jul 15, 2002May 17, 2005John E. TorreyMethod and apparatus for picking up seaweed and other litter
US7066275 *Sep 24, 2004Jun 27, 2006Keigley Kevin VRock separator with beveled tines and removable grates
US7641436Feb 5, 2008Jan 5, 2010Wippel Patrick VBale tote implement
US8069591 *Oct 2, 2009Dec 6, 2011Jerauld DunnMulti-purpose bucket arrangement
US8745903 *Feb 17, 2011Jun 10, 2014Brandon L. RitterRock removal skid steer attachment
US9216883Mar 4, 2013Dec 22, 2015Daws Manufacturing Co., Inc.Clamp-on fork lift attachment with stabilizer bar
US20040007367 *Jul 15, 2002Jan 15, 2004Torrey John E.Method and apparatus for picking up seaweed and other litter
US20050205270 *May 12, 2005Sep 22, 2005Torrey John EMethod and apparatus for picking up litter
US20090196713 *Feb 5, 2008Aug 6, 2009Wippel Patrick VBale tote implement
US20110078930 *Oct 2, 2009Apr 7, 2011Jerauld DunnMulti-Purpose Bucket Arrangement
USD788181 *May 17, 2016May 30, 2017John Charles DeLeonWheel loader excavator bucket with bottom mounted ripping teeth
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/724, 37/405, 37/446
International ClassificationA01D87/00, E02F3/40
Cooperative ClassificationA01D87/0053, E02F3/401
European ClassificationE02F3/40A, A01D87/00L