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Publication numberUS3834633 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateDec 10, 1973
Priority dateApr 13, 1972
Publication numberUS 3834633 A, US 3834633A, US-A-3834633, US3834633 A, US3834633A
InventorsDougall J, Moll A
Original AssigneeMinneapolis Electric Steel Cas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bowl and mantle assembly for cone crushers
US 3834633 A
Abstract
Liner assemblies for the bowl and mantel of a gyratory cone crushing machine. Each assembly includes a liner backing plate formed from a material of low abrasion resistance, such as mild steel, and which takes the form of a truncated cone to conform to the associated bowl or mantle. The crushing surface of the liner assembly is defined by a plurality of arcuate segments cast from martensitic white iron or steel and having a thickness substantially greater than that of the backing plate. The segments are arranged in ring fashion on the backing plate and secured thereto with a resilient adhesive such as urethane.
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United States Patent Dougall et a1.

[ BOWL AND MANTLE ASSEMBLY FOR CONE CRUSHERS [75] Inventors: James R. Dougall, New Brighton;

Alvin Donald Moll, St. Paul, both of Minn.

Minneapolis Electric Steel Castings Company, Minneapolis, Minn.

[22] Filed: Dec. 10, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 423,547

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 243,688, April 13, 1972,

[73] Assignee:

abandoned.

[52] U.S. Cl 241/295, 241/207, 241/299 [51] Int. Cl. B02c 2/04 [58] Field of Search 241/294, 295, 299, 300, 241/207 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,635,818 4/1953 Zoerb 241/299 X 2,913,189 11/1959 Werner 241/295 2,970,775 2/1961 Chapman 241/299 X Sept. 10, 1974 2,970,783 2/1961 Cheyette 241/300 3,503,564 3/1970. Adam 241/299 3,582,008 6/1971 Motz et a1.. 241/294 3,587,987 6/1971 Motz 241/294 3,612,421 10/1971- Sabel 241/295 X Primary Examiner-Granville Y. Custer, Jr.

Assistant ExaminerHoward N. Goldberg Attorney, Agent, 0r Firm--Merchant, Gould, Smith & Edell [5 7 ABSTRACT Liner assemblies for the bowl and mantel of a gyratory cone crushing machine. Each assembly includes a liner backing plate formed from .a material of low abrasion resistance, such as mild steel, and which takes the form of a truncated cone to conform to the associated bowl or mantle. The crushing surface of the liner assembly is defined by a plurality of arcuate segments cast from martensitic white iron or steel and having a thickness substantially greater than that of the backing plate. The segments are arranged in ring fashion on the backing plate and secured thereto with a resilient adhesive such as urethane.

17 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENIEB SEP 1 01974 934, 33

sum 1 or 2 BOWL AND MANTLE ASSEMBLY FOR CONE CRUSHERS This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 243,688, filed Apr. 13, 1972, and now abandoned.

The invention is directed to an improved liner assembly for either or both the bowl and mantle of a gyratory cone crusher machine.

Gyratory cone crushers are used in the mining industry for reducing ore to a predetermined fine size for further processing. Typically, gyratory cone crushers comprise a stationary conical bowl which opens downwardly and has a central opening in its top to receive feed material. A conical mantle is disposed beneath the bowl and is eccentrically rotated for gyratory crushing movement with respect to the mantle. The bowl and mantle each includes a liner assembly replaceably mounted thereon and which defines the actual crushing surface. US. Pat. No. 1,873,671, issued to E. B. Symons on Aug. 23, 1932 is an exemplary representation of a gyratory cone crushing machine.

Because the liner assemblies for the bowl and mantle are subjected to extreme forces in the reduction of ore to fine size, their wear rate is often extreme, particularly in the processing of very hard ore. This necessitates the replacement of the respective liner assemblies at periodic intervals, and it will be appreciated that such replacement results in a significant down time of the machine. This is particularly critical since many ore processing operations continue 24 hours a day.

The use of liner assemblies formed from material of great abrasion resistance has been a long felt need, but it has not been possible to form such materials in the necessary conical configuration. As an example, either martensitic white iron or martensitic steel is an ideal material from the standpoint of abrasion resistance, but both are brittle and undergo a significant volume change as they pass from the austenitic stage to martensitic form. In other words, it is extremely difficult to form from martensitic white iron or steel an article of size and configuration such as a bowl or mantle liner since the transformation to martensite (as the result of rapid cooling) cracks the liner, rendering it useless in an ore crushing application. Consequently, the material most often used for bowl and mantle liners is manganese steel, which offers a relatively good resistance to impact although its resistance to abrasion is low.

Another disadvantage of known bowl and mantle liner assemblies is the mating of assembly parts, which requires close tolerance machining to insure proper contact. Conventional liners have consisted of a support plate which can be of mild steel, which directly engages the bowl or mantle and has a wear surface (e.g., manganese steel) affixed thereto. To provide an effective fit between the support plate and wear surface material, machining has been necessary.

Our invention is directed to an improved liner assembly for either or both the bowl and mantle of a gyratory cone crushing machine. The inventive liner assembly comprises a support plate of mild steel or the like taking the form of a truncated cone, and a plurality of arcuate wear segments, preferably formed from martensitic white iron or martensitic steel, which are collectively arranged on the support plate in ring fashion and secured thereto with a resilient adhesive. In the preferred embodiment, the resilient adhesive is urethane, and it not only provides an adhesive bond between the respective segments and support plate, but also be tween adjacent edges of the segments themselves. Due to their size and shape, the segments can be made from martensitic white iron or steel without the fear of crack formation. The use of a resilient adhesive provides a thickness of material which conforms to both segments and support plate thereby eliminating the need for close tolerance machining. It is the segmented approach which permits the use of highly abrasion resistant materials for the wear segments, which in turn provides a significantly greater wear life for each liner assembly. The ability to use wear materials such as martensitic white iron enables the gyratory cone crushing machine to operate more efficiently, both from the standpoint of ore crushing and less down time of the machine.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a sectional view of a gyratory cone crushing machine including segmented bowl and mantle liner assemblies which embody the inventive principle;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the bowl liner assembly viewed from the bottom looking up;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the mantle liner assembly from the top looking down;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary top plan of the bowl liner assembly, portions thereof broken away;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the bowl liner assembly taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the mantle liner assembly taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. 1, a gyratory cone crushing machine represented generally by the numeral 11 is shown in section. The particular structure and operation of cone crushing machine 11 form no part of this invention, and reference is made to U.S. Pat. No. 1,873,671, issued to E. B. Symons on Aug. 23, 1932 for a more detailed description of this structure.

Briefly, machine 11 comprises a bowl structure 12 which is adjustably supported in a stationary, although upwardly yielding position by frame work 13 and a plurality of springs 14. A liner assembly for the bowl structure 12 is represented generally by the numeral 15 and is described in greater detail below. Bowl liner assembly 15 is secured to the bowl structure 12 by a plurality of lugs 16 which protrude through openings 17 and are received by a like number of hooking members 18.

Disposed immediately below the bowl structure 12 is a mantle 21 which is mounted on a large shaft 22. As is evident in FIG. 1, shaft 22 is canted slightly from the axis of bowl structure 12, and it is eccentrically driven by means not shown to effect gyrating movement of the mantle 21 with respect to the bowl structure 12. A liner assembly for the mantle 21 is represented generally by the numeral 23, and it is secured to the mantle by a collar ring 24 which is wedged downwardly by abutting engagement with a threaded ring member 25.

It will be appreciated from the foregoing description that each of the bowl and mantle liner assemblies 15 and 23 are removable to permit periodic replacement after becoming worn.

The ore to be processed is fed through an inlet 26 in the top of machine 11 and on to a feed plate 27 mounted on the shaft 22 for gyrating movements therewith. The ore is thus fed over the sides of the feed plate 27 into a hopper 28 which communicates with the gyrating bowl and mantle liner assemblies 15 and 23. The ore is thus progressively crushed with gyrating movement and thereby reduced in size to be subsequently dropped from between the liner assemblies for further processing.

With reference to FIGS. 2, 4 and 5, the bowl liner assembly comprises a backing or support plate 31 which takes the form of a truncated cone. Support plate 31 is preferably made from mild steel, and it defines an integral, continuous ring having a plurality of circumferentially arranged rectangular openings 32 formed therein.

Bowl liner assembly 15 further comprises a plurality of arcuate wear segments 33, each being substantially greater in thickness than the support plate 31 and having the lug 16 integrally formed therewith. The lug 16 is centrally located on the wear segment 33 for projection through opening 32, thus enabling the liner assembly 15 to be mounted on the booking members 18.

Wear segments 33 are made from material which is highly abrasion resistant, preferably martensitic white iron or martensitic steel. Thus, it will be apparent that the crushing surface which the wear segments 33 present to processed ore is high abrasion resistant, whereas the support plate 31, which is more ductile but offers less resistance to abrasion, abuttably engages the bowl structure 15.

The wear surface or face of segments 33, as best seen in FIG. 5, is chosen for the particular crushing application, and forms no part of the present invention. As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the rear face of each wear segment 33 is formed with a small ridge 34 which peripherally extends across its top edge and down each of the side edges to leave a slot opening along the bottom edge. A shoulder 35 (FIG. is also formed at the base of lug 16 to abut the upper wall or edge defining the rectangular opening 32. With the support plate 31 in an inverted position, the several wear segments '33 can be arranged in ring fashion, the position of each segment being determined by cooperation of the lug 16 and opening 32. Further, the wear segments 33 are spaced from the support plate 31 by the ridge 34, thus enabling each segment to be secured to the support plate 31 by a resilient adhesive 36. Preferably, resilient adhesive 36 is urethane, the liquid form of which is poured into the aforementioned slot to subsequently form a strong adhesive bond between the spaced surfaces. As shown in FIG. 4, the arcuate length of the segments 33 is chosen so that a gap is left between adjacent segments, and this gap is also filled with the resilient adhesive 36. Thus, the several wear segments 33 are adhesively secured to the support plate 31' and to each other to provide an improved liner assembly for the bowl structure 12.

With reference to FIGS. 3 and 6, mantle liner assembly 23 also includes a support plate 37 similar to the support plate 31 of bowl liner assembly 15, and a plurality of arcuate wear segments 38. As best shown in FIG. 3, the outer face of support plate 37 has a plurality of lugs 39 formed thereon which are essentially rectangular in shape and arranged in lower and upper circular rows. The wear segments 38 are equal in size, and the lugs 39 are circumferentially spaced so that each wear segment 38 will cooperate with three of the lugs 39.

Like the plate 31, support plate 37 takes the form of a truncated cone and is preferably made from mild steel to provide a strong continuous backing surface for the wear segments 38.

The sectional view of FIG. 6 shows each wear segment to have an irregular outer face; although, as with the wear segments 33, this shape is determined by the particular crushing application and forms no part of this invention. The outer segment face includes a concave recess 41 which defines a circumferential recess with all of the wear segments 38 assembled to receive the collar 24. Below the concave recess is a crushingsurface 42 which engages the surface 40 of an opposed segment 33, and the outer surface terminates in a skirt portion 43.

The inner surface of each wear segment 38 has three rectangular recesses or receptacles 44 formed therein to receive the lugs 39. The depth of recesses 44 is slightly less than the projecting dimension of the lugs 39, and it will therefore be appreciated that the wear segment 38 will be spaced from the support member37 when properly placed thereon. As with the bowl liner assembly, its spacing is provided to receive a thickness of resilient adhesive 45 (preferably urethane) which strongly affixes the respective segments 38 to the support plate 37 in ring configuration. As before, each of the segments 38 has an arcuate length chosen to define a radial gap with adjacent segments 38 (FIG. 3), and this gap is also filled with resilient adhesive 45 in order for the segment 38 to be adhesively secured to each other as well as to the support plate 37.

Although there is metal to metal contact in each of the bowl and mantle liner assemblies 15 and 23, the urethane nevertheless provides a resilient backing to the wear segments 33 and 38 at points between the ridges 34 or lugs 39. Thus, the concept of segmenting the bowl and liner assemblies permits the use of much harder (and-more brittle) materials; and the use of a thickness of resilient adhesive not only enables the brittle, abrasion resistant wear segments to be firmly secured to the continuous, nonbrittle support or backing plate, but also reduces the chance of breaking a wear segment by absorbing and distributing the crushing forces. The result of our invention is a liner assembly for either or both the bowl and mantle of a gyratory cone crushing machine which entirely avoids the virtually insurmountable problem of integrally casting highly abrasion resistant materials, which eliminates the machining of mating surfaces, which crushes more efficiently (by reason of the use of highly abrasion resistant materials) and which offers a significantly longer wear life.

We claim:

1. A removeable liner assembly for the bowl of a gyratory crusher having a plurality of hooking members adapted to receive and retain the liner assembly, comprising:

a. a backing plate essentially taking the form of a truncated cone with a central opening therein and made from material having a predetermined resistance to abrasion;

b. a plurality of wear segments constructed for mounting on the backing plate and collectively defining a crushing surface, each segment formed from material having a resistance to abrasion greater than that of the backing plate;

0. said backing plate having an opening for each of said wear segments;

d. each wear segment having a lug member disposed on the backside thereof, each lug member constructed and arranged to project through its associated opening in the backing plate for retaining engagement with one of said hooking members;

e. and each wear segment being secured to the backing plate with a resilient adhesive.

2. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein the resilient adhesive is urethane.

3. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein the wear segments are formed from martensitic white iron.

4. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein the wear segments are constructed and arranged on the backing member to define a gap between adjacent segments, said gaps being filled with said resilient adhesive to secure adjacent segments to each other.

5. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein each of said lug members further comprises a shoulder portion disposed at its base for abutting engagement with the wall defining said opening.

6. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein one of said backing plate and wear segments has ridge means disposed thereon for spacing the respective segments from the backing plate, the resilient adhesive being disposed in said space.

7. The liner assembly defined by claim 6, wherein the ridge means are disposed on the back side of said wear segments, comprising a ridge extending around at least a portion of the periphery of said segment back side.

8. A removeable liner assembly for a gyratory crusher having a conical bowl and mantle relatively moveable in gyratory fashion, the liner assembly constructed for use with one of said bowl and mantle and comprising:

a. a backing plate essentially taking the form of a truncated cone with a central opening therein and made from material having a predetermined resistance to abrasion;

b. a plurality of wear segments constructed for mounting on the backing plate and collectively defining a crushing surface, each segment formed from material having a resistance to abrasion greater than that of the backing plate;

c. one of said backing plate and wear segments having a plurality of lugs of predetermined size and shape projecting therefrom;

d. the other of said backing plate and wear segments having a like number of recesses conforming in size and shape to the projecting lugs and disposed for cooperative engagement therewith;

e. and said wear segments being secured to the backing plate with a resilient adhesive.

9. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the depth of said recesses is less than the projecting dimension of each of said lugs to effect spacing of the wear segments from the backing plate, the resilient adhesive being disposed in said space.

10. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the projecting lugs are disposed on the backing member in circular rows.

11. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein the wear segments are arcuately shaped and identically sized to collectively define a truncated conical crushing surface.

12. The liner assembly defined by claim 1, wherein the wear segments are formed from martensitic steel.

13. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the resilient adhesive is urethane.

14. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the wear segments are formed from martensitic white iron.

15. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the wear segments are formed from martensitic steel.

16. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the wear segments are constructed and arranged on the backing member to define a gap between adjacent seg-, ments, said gap being filled with said resilient adhesive to secure adjacent segments to each other.

17. The liner assembly defined by claim 8, wherein the wear segments are arcuately shaped and identically sized to collectively define a truncated conical crushing

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2635818 *Jan 8, 1951Apr 21, 1953Nordberg Manufacturing CoGyratory crusher and liner and mantle therefor
US2913189 *Jul 27, 1956Nov 17, 1959Nordberg Manufacturing CoMantles for cone crushers
US2970775 *May 2, 1958Feb 7, 1961Nordberg Manufacturiang CompanMethod of backing crusher parts
US2970783 *May 1, 1958Feb 7, 1961Nordberg Manufacturing CoComposite wearing parts for crushers and the like
US3503564 *Aug 24, 1967Mar 31, 1970Nordberg Manufacturing CoBowl for crushers and the like
US3582008 *Jul 8, 1969Jun 1, 1971Nordberg Manufacturing CoBimetal crusher liner
US3587987 *Mar 7, 1969Jun 28, 1971Nordberg Manufacturing CoSegmented crusher liner
US3612421 *Jul 22, 1969Oct 12, 1971Sabel Erik ArneWearing parts for crushers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3944091 *Jan 27, 1975Mar 16, 1976Lindemann Maschinenfabrik GmbhSecuring means of replaceable wearing plates in smashing machines
US4010905 *Mar 25, 1975Mar 8, 1977Rexnord Inc.Liner segment for use in cone crushers and the like
US4077575 *Nov 18, 1976Mar 7, 1978Lindemann Maschinenfabrik GmbhSecuring means of replaceable wearing plates in smashing machines
US4410143 *Sep 26, 1980Oct 18, 1983Allis-Chalmers CorporationMain shaft assembly for a gyratory crusher
US4611766 *Jun 26, 1985Sep 16, 1986Esco CorporationRetainer apparatus for releasably securing a bowl liner in a rock crusher
US4919348 *Oct 10, 1989Apr 24, 1990Johnson Louis WDust seal for gyratory rock crushers
US5163213 *Nov 1, 1991Nov 17, 1992Brizendine Julian FHydraulically retrofitting mechanically adjustable cone crushers
US5649669 *Apr 24, 1995Jul 22, 1997Ani America, Inc.Cone crusher
US5870813 *Jul 21, 1997Feb 16, 1999Ani America Inc.Hydraulic spring crusher
US6007009 *Oct 14, 1998Dec 28, 1999Ani Mineral Processing, Inc.Bowl assembly for cone crusher
US6129297 *Jul 30, 1997Oct 10, 2000Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.Cone crusher with wear indicator
US7451944Jan 29, 2007Nov 18, 2008Hall David RReplaceable segmented wear liner
US7771572 *Feb 8, 2007Aug 10, 2010Minyu Machinery Corp., Ltd.Cone crusher fixed toothed plate fixing structure
US8622331 *Apr 28, 2011Jan 7, 2014Leon Mitchell VenterGyratory cone crusher
US20130056570 *Apr 28, 2011Mar 7, 2013Leon Mitchell VenterGyratory cone crusher
CN101816961BDec 3, 2009Oct 3, 2012浙江双金机械集团股份有限公司Anti-wear movable sleeve special for cone sand making machine
EP2692442A1 *Aug 2, 2012Feb 5, 2014Sandvik Intellectual Property ABGyratory crusher outer crushing shell
WO2014019762A1 *Jun 19, 2013Feb 6, 2014Sandvik Intellectual Property AbGyratory crusher outer crushing shell
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/295, 241/207, 241/299
International ClassificationB02C2/00
Cooperative ClassificationB02C2/005
European ClassificationB02C2/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 9, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: GROSSMAN S INC.
Owner name: ME INTERNATIONAL, 3901 UNIVERSITY AVENUE N.E., MIN
Effective date: 19881105
May 9, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: ME INTERNATIONAL, 3901 UNIVERSITY AVENUE N.E., MIN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GROSSMAN S INC.;REEL/FRAME:004869/0577
Effective date: 19881105
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GROSSMAN S INC.;REEL/FRAME:004869/0577
Owner name: ME INTERNATIONAL,MINNESOTA