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Publication numberUS3834699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateJun 23, 1971
Priority dateJun 23, 1971
Publication numberUS 3834699 A, US 3834699A, US-A-3834699, US3834699 A, US3834699A
InventorsPass R
Original AssigneePass R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of stringing a game racket
US 3834699 A
Abstract
In tennis rackets and the like a faster and more efficient method of stringing racket frames wherein the strings are inserted and tensioned within the frame without interweaving the longitudinal and latitudinal strings. The net thus formed is than consolidated into a unified structure by bonding the longitudinal strings to the latitudinal strings at each point that the longitudinal strings cross the latitudinal strings.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [19] Pass [11] 3,834,699 [451 Sept. 10, 1974 METHOD OF STRINGING A GAME RACKET [76] Inventor: Roger D. Pass, 1119 W. Montana Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 55108 [22] Filed: June 23, 1971 [21] Appl. No.1 155,830

[52] US. Cl. 273/73 D, 273/73 C [51] Int. Cl. A63b 51/02, A63b 51/08 [58] Field of Search 273/73 A-73 .1,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,548,484 12/1970 Carlton 273/73 D FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 715,356 9/1931 France 273/73 D 901,279 10/1944 France 273/73 D 1,043,897 11/1958 Germany 273/73 D 331,925 7/1930 Great Britain 273/73 D 409,924 5/1934 Great Britain 273/73 D 887,526 1/1962 7 Great Britain 273/73 D 855,902 2/1940 France 273/73 D 188,260 11/1922 Great Britain 273/73 D Primary Examiner-Richard C Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Richard J. Apley 5 7] ABSTRACT In tennis rackets and the like a faster and more efficient method of stringing racket frames wherein the strings are inserted and tensioned within the frame without interweaving the longitudinal and latitudinal strings. The net thus formed is than consolidated into a unified structure by bonding the longitudinal strings to the latitudinal strings at each point that the longitudinal strings cross the latitudinal strings.

2 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures BONDED IONO PATENTEDSEPIOIW 3.834.699

SHEET I. []F 2 FIG1 METHOD OF STRINGING A GAME RACKET BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention Class 273, Amusement Devices, Games; Subclass 73, Tennis.

2. Description of the Prior Art Rackets, such as tennis rackets, because of their oval, bow or round shaped frame, have beenstrung in such a fashion that the strings on the sides are considerably shorter (an average of 3 to 5 inches shorter) than those parallel strings strung through the center of the frame. This aggravates the dead area around the perimeter of the racket frame so that only when consistently hitting the ball in the very center of the racket frame can a lively uniform reactance to the ball be achieved. Balls struck off center where the strings become shorter and shorter do not receive the same reactance as the balls do struck in the center and an erratic performance is obtained. This becomes more pronounced as the distance from the center increases. That variation in reactance, which is clue to the differences in the length of the strings, has now been resolved by the applicants invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A racket, such as a tennis racket etc., is provided whose frame is of such a configuration (preferably convexed square or convexed rectangular) that the variation in length of the longitudinal strings and the variation in length of the latitudinal strings is minimized.

A serrated annular member mounted on the frame of a racket, such as a tennis racket etc., the serrations of such a length that they compensate for the configuration of the racket frame so that the variation in length of the longitudinal strings and the variation in length of the latitudinal strings is minimized.

A method of stringing a racket, such as a tennis racket etc., without interweaving the strings; a method of fastening the strings together at their crossover points by welding or bonding by adhesive. Thus, this invention provides a faster and more efficient method of stringing rackets than the currently time-consuming method of interweaving the strings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a front view of a convexed rectangular racket frame.

FIG. 2 is a front view of a convexed square racket frame.

FIG. 3 is a front view of a convexed square racket frame provided with an annular member having differential serrations.

FIG. 4 is a front view of an oval or bow shaped racket frame provided with an annular member having differential serrations.

FIG. 5 is a top view of a I on stringing pattern.

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view of a I on I" stringing pattern.

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view of a 2 on I stringing pattern.

FIG. 9 is across sectional view ofa 2 on 2" stringing pattern.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The sides 1, l, 2, 2' of the convexed rectangular racket frame shown in FIG. I are curved outwardly in the form of an arch. Said sides could also be linear, however, convexed sides are more structurally stable, esthetically pleasing and the variation in length of the longitudinal strings and the variation in length of the latitudinal strings is so minimized to be negligible. As the ratio of the sides 1, I to sides 2, 2' approach equality the longitudinal and latitudinal strings also approach equality until equality is achieved with a convexed square frame as shown in FIG. 2. The sides 3, 3', 4, 4' of FIG. 2 are curved outwardly in the form of an arch but could also be linear. Both the convexed square and the convexed rectangular racket frame shapes achieve a much larger area in the center of the racket where a uniform reactance by the strings is imparted to the ball than is found in conventional oval, bow or round frame shaped rackets. However, oval, bow, round or any other frame shaped rackets can be modified so as to be strung with all the strings of an equal or nearly equal length. FIG. 4 shows such a design. A series of projections consisting of a serrated annular member (these projections could take other forms such as hooks or. springs) are mounted generally parallel to the inner periphery of the racket frame 6 as described in US. Pat. No. 3,078,098. The improvement, however, lies in the fact that the serrations 7 are of different length (not just spacing) so as to permit all the longitudinal strings to be equal or nearly equal in length and all the latitudinal strings to be equal or nearly equal in length. If desired, the serrations can be lengthened and/or shortened so that the rectangular string pattern approaches or equals a square pattern as shown in FIG. 3. Serrations of different length so that all longitudinal and/or latitudinal strings are of an equal or nearly equal length can be applied equally as well to a racket frame of any cross sectional configuration whether it be oval, round, bow, rectangular, convexed square, convexed rectangular or some other shape.

An additional improvement inherent in the designs shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 4 is that there are no areas in the frame in which both longitudinal and latitudinal strings must enter the same stringing hole or serration as is now the case in conventional rackets. The racket is now easier to string and the stresses exerted by the strings on the racket frame are more evenly distributed.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate an improved method of stringing a racket frame that does not require interweaving of the strings. The longitudinal strings 8 are inserted in the frame and the latitudinal strings 9 are inserted in the frame without interweaving them. This particular stringing pattern will be referred to as a 1 on 0 stringing pattern where all the longitudinal strings 8 lie in one plane and all the latitudinal strings 9 lie in another plane.

FIG. 7 illustrates an alternate I on 1 stringing pattern. The longitudinal strings l0 lie in one plane and the runs of the latitudinal strings ll traverse alternately the top and bottom sides of the plane of the longitudinal strings. This produces, in practice, a more stable stringing pattern than the I on O" stringing pattern shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

FIG. 8 shows an alternate 2 on I stringing pattern which provides a different purchase on the ball than the l on 1 or 1 on stringing pattern. This purchase can also be varied depending which side of the racket is used tostrike the ball. The longitudinal strings l2 lie in one plane and the latitudinal strings 13 in runs of two and in runs of one traverse alternately the top and bottom sides of the plane of the longitudinal strings.

FIG. 9 illustrates a 2 on 2 stringing pattern also providing a slightly different purchase on the ball. The longitudinal strings 14 lie in one plane and the latitudinal strings 15 traverse alternately in runs of two the top and bottom sides of the plane of the longitudinal strings.

Tennis players especially may find the different purchases on the ball provided by the alternate stringing patterns mentioned above very advantageous in ball control and exerting spin on the ball. Other stringing patterns that do not require interweaving of the strings could also be used, such as, a 3 on 1, 3 on 2, 3 on 3 or some other combination.

These improved methods of stringing would be just as effective using any number of strings, from a plurality of longitudinal strings and a plurality of latitudinal strings to one longitudinal and one latitudinal string of sufficient length to provide a plurality of runs within the racket frame.

The strings in any one of the stringing patterns mentioned above can be tensioned in the conventional manner by hand or by stringing machines or a quick and simple method of tensioning the strings can now be used. Both the longitudinal strings and the latitudinal strings are tensioned by working the slack to the outside sides of the frame. In order to get the proper tension it is necessary to do this in several steps, each time getting the strings progressively tighter. By working alternately in tightening the longitudinal and latitudinal strings the tension is applied to the frame in all directions at the same time and the frame is not pulled out of shape as so often happens when the longitudinal strings are put in and fully tensioned and then the latitudinal strings are put in and fully tensioned.

The net thus formed in any one of the stringing patterns mentioned above are than consolidated into a unified structure by fastening, welding or bonding the longitudinal strings to the latitudinal strings at each point that the longitudinal strings cross the latitudinal strings.

l claim:

1. A method of stringing a game racket, having at least a frame, shaft, handle and strings, which method includes the steps of: inserting and tensioning the longitudinal strings, consisting of a plurality of spaced apart parallel runs of said longitudinal strings, within the frame, so that the longitudinal strings lie in the same plane;

inserting and tensioning the latitudinal strings, in-

cluding a plurality of spaced apart parallel runs of said latitudinal strings, within the frame on only one side of the plane formed by the longitudinal strings, without interweaving the longitudinal and latitudinal strings; and

bonding the longitudinal and the latitudinal strings together at their cross over points, thereby consolidating the longitudinal and latitudinal strings into a coacting net of strings.

2. In the method of claim 1 including, inserting and tensioning additional latitudinal strings, including a plurality of spaced apart parallel runs of said additional latitudinal strings, within the frame on the side opposite said one side of the plane formed by the longitudinal strings, without interweaving the longitudinal and said additional latitudinal strings; and bonding the longitudinal and said additional latitudinal strings together at their cross over points, thereby consolidating the longitudinal and said additional latitudinal strings into a coacting net of strings.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3548484 *Mar 27, 1969Dec 22, 1970Carlton Sports Co LtdMethod of preparing for stringing the frame of a games racket
*DE1043897A Title not available
FR715356A * Title not available
FR855902A * Title not available
FR901279A * Title not available
GB188260A * Title not available
GB331925A * Title not available
GB409924A * Title not available
GB887526A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3917267 *Mar 23, 1973Nov 4, 1975Mcgrath Charles ATennis racket
US4029317 *Sep 5, 1975Jun 14, 1977Sven Erik MalmstromGames racket
US4057249 *Aug 28, 1975Nov 8, 1977Reedhead Frederick WTennis racket
US4082275 *Jul 26, 1976Apr 4, 1978Soong Tsai CSport racket
US4093220 *Oct 28, 1976Jun 6, 1978Mike PrewarskiTennis racket string network
US4131279 *Aug 23, 1976Dec 26, 1978Ogden John MTennis racket and stringing method
US4162791 *Oct 20, 1977Jul 31, 1979Seehase Jack CTennis racquet having radially arrayed strings
US4165071 *Jan 5, 1976Aug 21, 1979Frolow Jack LTennis racket
US4189142 *Jun 22, 1977Feb 19, 1980Vries Robert DeTennis racket
US4190249 *May 5, 1977Feb 26, 1980Werner FischerTennis racket and method of making same
US4231575 *Dec 23, 1977Nov 4, 1980Mers KuttRacket stringing
US4238262 *Jul 26, 1978Dec 9, 1980Fishel Clark WApplying particles and adhesive to racquet strings
US4247104 *Jan 31, 1979Jan 27, 1981Crown Recreation, Inc.Tennis racquet
US4249731 *Oct 31, 1977Feb 10, 1981Amster Harlan DGame racket
US4273331 *Dec 8, 1977Jun 16, 1981Werner FischerTennis-racket
US4291574 *Mar 26, 1979Sep 29, 1981Frolow Jack LTennis racket
US4299385 *Aug 10, 1979Nov 10, 1981Boden Robert ORacquet
US4360201 *Mar 31, 1980Nov 23, 1982Roy J. BiehlRacquetball or tennis racquet
US4458898 *Apr 19, 1982Jul 10, 1984Boden Robert ORacquet with string positioning elements
US4512575 *Nov 30, 1982Apr 23, 1985Tzeng Kuo NanRacquet having strings of equal length
US4566695 *Mar 17, 1983Jan 28, 1986Melby Phillip JGame racket having adjustable string mounts
US4685676 *Jan 30, 1986Aug 11, 1987Boden Robert ORacquet structure
US4732384 *Jul 27, 1984Mar 22, 1988Seymour Robert JRacquet having centralized sweet spot
US4750742 *Jun 17, 1986Jun 14, 1988Coupar Robert BModified one-span stringing racquet and method of stringing
US5141227 *Nov 8, 1989Aug 25, 1992Klaus FlammPrefabricated stringing for a sports racket
US5570883 *Jun 21, 1995Nov 5, 1996Csabai; Julius S.Sport racket with string stabilization and friction coating
US5707306 *Feb 7, 1996Jan 13, 1998Boden; Robert O.Tennis racket stringing pattern and method therefor
US6132325 *Jun 1, 1998Oct 17, 2000Bertolotti; Fabio PInterlocking string network for sport rackets
US6280354Mar 27, 2000Aug 28, 2001Fabio P BertolottiMonolithic string network for sport rackets
US6386999 *Apr 2, 2001May 14, 2002Craig C. WhiteMethod of using a forming grid with a fielding practice bat
US6506134Jul 13, 2001Jan 14, 2003Fabio Paolo BertolottiInterlocking string network for sports rackets
US8808121May 15, 2013Aug 19, 2014Wilson Sporting Goods Co.Racquet configured with fewer cross strings than main strings
US9089743May 15, 2013Jul 28, 2015Wilson Sporting Goods Co.Racquet configured with fewer cross strings than main strings
US9132322 *May 22, 2014Sep 15, 2015Kenneth R. ColeyTennis racket
US20060293127 *Sep 27, 2005Dec 28, 2006William RiesserRacket and method of stringing the racket
USRE31419 *Jan 28, 1981Oct 18, 1983 Tennis racket
EP0429533A1Aug 17, 1989Jun 5, 1991Rodney SvomaSports racket.
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/543
International ClassificationA63B51/08, A63B51/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B51/08, A63B51/00
European ClassificationA63B51/00