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Publication numberUS3834701 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateNov 9, 1973
Priority dateJul 7, 1973
Publication numberUS 3834701 A, US 3834701A, US-A-3834701, US3834701 A, US3834701A
InventorsK Hashimoto
Original AssigneeK Hashimoto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Basketball game amusement device
US 3834701 A
Abstract
A basketball game amusement device featuring a housing, a wall positioned at the center of the housing and extending upwardly therefrom, basket goals mounted on opposite sides of the wall and above the top surface of the housing, a transparent dome secured to said housing so as to define two separate playing areas on opposite sides of the wall, a plurality of supporting surfaces positioned in a row extending across the housing at positions near the ends thereof and within the dome, actuating members positioned within the supporting surfaces for propelling a ball located therein, a plurality of operating members extending across the opposite ends of the housing located outside of the dome and corresponding to the supporting surfaces such that as an individual operating member is depressed, its corresponding actuating member propels a ball located within its supporting surface towards its basket goal and a system associated with each of the basket goals for counting the number of times a ball passes therethrough.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,834,701 Hashimoto Sept. 10, 1974 BASKETBALL GAME AMUSEMENT 487,027 10/1952 Canada 273/102.1 o

DEVICE 1,053,030 9/1953 France 273/94 D [76] Inventor: Kazuyuki Hashimoto, Ohana-Jaya 3-8-20 Katsushika-ku, Tokyo, Japan [22] Filed: Nov. 9, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 414,515

I [30] Foreign Application Priority Data July 7, 1973 Japan ..48-80877 [52] U.S. Cl. 273/85 C, 273/101, 273/D1G. 26, 124/1 [51] Int. Cl. A631 7/06 [58] Field of Search 273/l.5 R, 85 R, 85 C, 273/85 D, 85 E, DIG. 26, 102.1 C, 102.1 D, 102.1 F, 94 C, 94 D, 94 E; 116/120 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,161,171 11/1915 Vertunni 273/l02.l D 1,730,310 lO/1929 Weidenfeld.... 273/102.l D 2,526,215 lO/1950 Florimont 273/86 F 2,893,734 7/1959 Tarte, Jr. 273/l.5 R X 3,074,720 1/1963 Carver et a]. 273/85 E 3,119,620 l/l964 Peterson 273/129 X 3,637,213 l/l972 Breslow et al. 273/101 3,685,829 8/1972 Barlow 273/101 3,712,615 l/1973 Staats et al.... 273/86 R 3,781,010 12/1973 Matsumoto 273/85 C 3,785,552 1/1974 Payne, Jr. 273/85 R X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 18,934 9/1909 Great Britain 273/l02.l C

Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Harry G. Strappello Attorney, Agent, or FirmStaas, Halsey & Gable 5 7 ABSTRACT A basketball game amusement device featuring a housing, a wall positioned at the center of the housing and extending upwardly therefrom, basket goals mounted on opposite sides of the wall and above the top surface of the housing, a transparent dome secured to said housing so as to define two separate playing areas on opposite sides of the wall, a plurality of supporting surfaces positioned in a row extending across the housing at positions near the ends thereof and within the dome, actuating members positioned within the supporting surfaces for propelling a ball located therein, a plurality of operating members extending across the opposite ends of the housing located outside of the dome and corresponding to the supporting surfaces such that as :an individual operating member is depressed, its corresponding actuating member propels a ball located within its supporting surface towards its basket goal and a systemassociated with each of the basket goals for counting the number of times a ball passes therethrough.

6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTED SEP] 0 I974 SHEEF 3 0F 4 BASKETBALL GAME AMUSEMENT DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the general class of games simulating popular sports, particularly basketball.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention concerns an amusement device characterized by its sturdy construction, simplicity of use and variety of amusement features simulating the action of a basketball game. Extending upwardly from the housing is a wall dividing the game into two separate playing areas. Basket goals are mounted on opposite sides of the wall and a transparent dome is secured to the housing so as to define two distinct playing areas for use by opposing players, while furthermore confining each of the two basketballs to its playing area. At each end of the housing are located corresponding supporting surfaces or depressions within which the ball within each playing area eventually is deposited and operating and actuating members associated with each of the depressions for propelling the ball towards its corresponding basket goal. Associated with each of the basket goals is a system for automatically counting the number of times the ball successfully passes through the goal and displaying the number of successful baskets in such a manner that the players are advised of their scores. Moreover, a timing mechanism may be employed permitting a single player to compete by way of determining the number of successful baskets scored within a prescribed period of time.

While basketball game amusement devices featuring two baskets and means for propelling a single ball are old in the art, the invention disclosed herein featuring multiple baskets, multiple balls and a counting and scoring system provides for a wide variety of amuse ment functions not previously found in the art.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the basketball game amusement device of the present invention illustrating the housing provided with a centrally disposed upstanding wall on opposite sides of which are mounted basket goals, the transparent dome defining separate playing areas, the supporting surfaces or depressions at each end of the housing within which the ball of each player comes to rest and the corresponding buttons for propelling the ball from each depression towards the hasket, it being noted that below each basket is positioned an actuating rod constituting an integral part of the counting system as explained in detail hereinafter;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the basketball game amusement device illustrating more particularly the relationship between the depressions or supporting surfaces and the operating members for propelling the ball;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross sectional view taken along one end of the housing illustrating in detail the mechanism for propelling a ball from its supporting surface towards the goal upon downward movement of its corresponding operating member;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of one corner of the housing with a portion of the surface thereof broken away to further illustrate the mechanism for propelling the balls towards the basket goals;

FIG. 5 is an end elevational view of the basketball game amusement device with one side of the upstanding wall and basket goal removed. so as to expose the mechanism for counting the number of successful baskets, and as well as independent timer which may be positioned at the top of the amusement device permitting one or more players to compete within a set time period;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the components comprising one of the counting mechanisms;

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal cross sectional view illustrating the arrangement of the arms which extend underneath each of the basket goals and which actuate move ment of the scoring markers; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged cross sectional view illustrating the ratchet mechanism associated with each of the counting systems for advancing each scoring marker as a goal is scored.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As illustrated in FIG. 1, the basketball game amusement device of the present invention includes a housing 10 provided with an upper playing surface 12 within which a plurality of depressions 14 are located near each end thereof. At each end of the housing 10 are located a plurality of openings 16 corresponding to the depressions 14 and through which operating members or buttons 18 extend, as explained in detail hereinafter.

Extending upwardly from the center of the housing 10 is a wall 20 on opposite sides of which are located the basket goals 22. The distinct playing areas are defined by the transparent dome 24 which is secured to both the housing 10 and the wall 20, it being further apparent that each of the balls 26 is thereby confined during play to its respective playing :area.

Within the wall 20 are located reciprocably mounted scoring cards or markers 28 operatively connected to and actuated by the corresponding rods 30 which are located below each of the baskets 22 such that as a goal is scored the corresponding marker 28 moves upwardly a predetermined distance exposing an indicia disclosing the number of successful goals the player has scored.

Thus, and as illustrated on the lefthand side of FIG. 1, a player depresses that button 18' corresponding to the supporting surface 14 within which the ball 26' rests propelling the ball 26 to the basket goal 22. As each player scores, the ball passes downwardly through the goal 22 depressing the rod 30 automatically registering a new score as the marker 28 moves upwardly to its next position exposing the next indicia. It is understood that each of the playing surfaces 12 formed as the top of the housing 10 slopes downwardly towards the depressions 14 thus ensuring that each ball 26 must reach that portion of the housing 10 within which the depressions or supporting surfaces 14 are located thus keeping the ball 26 continuously in play.

Turning now to the system for propelling the individual balls 26, it can be seen from FIGS. 3 and 4 that a rod 32 is suitably joumalled below the top surface of each end of the housing 10. Mounted for rotation about each rod 32 are a plurality of actuating members 34 terminating forwardly at one end thereof in flanges 36 positioned, as illustrated in FIG. 3, to move upwardly within the openings 38 formed at the bottom of the depressions 14. A plurality of supporting members 40 corresponding to the depressions 14 extend upwardly within each end of the housing and are provided with springs 42 surrounding same. The operating members or buttons 18 fit over the rods 40 and are urged upwardly into engagement with the frame 10 by the action of the springs 42.

As will now be apparent from FIG. 3, as the ball 26 rolls into one of the depressions 14, the player depresses the corresponding operating member 18 causing same to move downwardly against the force of the spring 42 until the edge 44 of the member 18 contacts the end 46 of the actuating member 34 causing same to rotate about the rod 32 at which time the flange 36 moves upwardly eventually engaging the ball 26 propelling same towards the basket goal 22.

As illustrated in FIG. 5, the upstanding wall is hollow, the mechanism for counting successful goals being positioned therein and hidden from view by the facing members 48, illustrated in FIG. 1, which facing members 48 may include pictorial representations of a basketball game. The counting mechanism designated generally by the reference numeral 50 in FIGS. 5 and 6 comprises a frame 52 suitably mounted to one of the facing members 48, for example, by screws 54. Slidably mounted within each side of the frame 52 are the scoring markers 28. Each of the markers 28 is provided at the side thereof with a rack of teeth 56 and at its lowermost portion thereof with a hook 58 to which a spring 60 is secured. The other end of the spring 60, as illus' trated in FIGS. 6 and 8, is secured to a rod 62 mounted to the frame 52. Thus, the scoring markers 28 are normally urged upwardly by the springs 60.

A ratchet mechanism designated generally by the reference numeral 64 is provided with a plate 66 and is mounted for rotation about the rod 62 in such manner that the teeth 68 thereof normally fit within the teeth of the rack 56. It is noted that the frame 52 is provided with a leaf spring 70 which normally abuts the plate 66 of the ratchet mechanism 64 causing same to rotate such that the teeth 68 of the ratchet mechanism 64 are positioned within the teeth of the rack 56. Also mounted for rotation about each rod 62 is an actuating arm 30.

As will now be apparent, as the ball 26 passes through its corresponding basket 22, the actuating arm is urged downwardly causing, as illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, the actuating arm 30 to rotate about the rod 62. The upper portion of each actuating arm 30 includes an abutment 72 through which the rod 62 passes and which engages the plate 66 of the ratchet mechanism 64. Thus, as the actuating rod 30 rotates its abutment 72 engages the plate 66 in turn moving the ratchet mechanism 64 from the position illustrated in solid lines in FIG. 8 to the position illustrated in dotted lines. At this time, the scoring marker 28 moves up wardly under the influence of the spring 60 one digit until the surface of the next tooth 69' of the rack 56 engages the uppermost tooth 68 of the ratchet mechanism 64 at which time the upward movement of the scoring marker 28 is terminated.

As the ball 26 moves into play, the actuating rod 30 resumes its normal position under the influence of the leaf spring 70 at which time the lower tooth 68 of the ratchet mechanism 64 engages a corresponding tooth of the rack 56, as illustrated in FIG. 8. As will be apparent, as each of the players scores a basket his corresponding scoring marker 28 moves upwardly one digit corresponding to the space defined by the teeth of the rack 56. As illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, the scoring markers 28 include indicia designating the score, two points being allocated for each basket.

Finally, the reference numeral 74 designates a timing mechanism of conventional construction which may be mounted upon the top of the wall 20. The details of construction of the timing mechanism 74 are not disclosed herein as such construction is well known in the art. It is noted, however, that the self-contained timing mechanism 74 may be used by one or two players for the purpose of determining how many points can be scored within a prescribed period of time.

I claim:

1. A basketball game amusement device, comprising:

a housing;

a wall positioned generally in the center of said housing and extending upwardly therefrom;

goals positioned on opposite side surface of said wall;

a transparent dome secured to said housing and cooperating with said wall to define completely separated playing areas on opposite sides of said wall;

a ball within each of said playing areas;

a plurality of supporting surfaces located near each end of said housing and within said dome, each supporting surface having an opening formed therein, and actuating members positioned below each of said supporting surfaces for propelling the ball;

a plurality of operating members located at each en of said housing and outside said dome and corresponding to said supporting surfaces, and means operatively connecting said actuating members and said operating members such that as one of said operating members is contacted its corresponding actuating member is operated to propel the ball from its supporting surface towards its corresponding goal; and

means associated with each of said goals for counting the number of times a ball passes therethrough.

2. A basketball game amusement device as in claim 1, wherein said means associated with each of said goals for counting the number of times a ball passes therethrough comprises a scoring marker provided with increasing indicia corresponding to each playing area, means normally biasing said marker upwardly within said wall which extends upwardly from said housing, and means advancing said marker as a goal is scored to expose the next indicia.

3. A basketball game amusement device as in claim 2, wherein said means advancing said scoring marker comprises a rack extending the length of said marker, a ratchet mechanism provided with teeth, means normally urging said teeth of said ratchet mechanism into engagement with said rack of said marker to prevent movement of said marker, and means disengaging said teeth of said ratchet mechanism from said rack of said marker and thereafter engaging said teeth after said marker has moved upwardly a predetermined distance.

4. A basketball game amusement device as in claim 3, wherein said means disengaging said teeth of said ratchet mechanism from said rack of said marker comprises an actuating rod, means mounting said actuating rod for movement with respect to said ratchet mechanism such that movement of said actuating rod moves said ratchet mechanism so as to release the teeth thereof from said rack of said scoring card, said actuating rod including a lower portion extending directly under said goal.

5. A basketball game amusement device as in claim 1, wherein said means operatively connecting said actuating members and said operating members includes a rod secured to said housing, said actuating members being mounted to said rod for rotation, one end of each

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4012037 *Dec 8, 1975Mar 15, 1977Vernon KinserScore keeping units
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/317.3, 273/383, 124/79, 273/357, 273/DIG.260
International ClassificationA63F7/06, A63F7/20
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/249, A63F7/0612, A63F7/2481, Y10S273/26
European ClassificationA63F7/06A3