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Publication numberUS3835246 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateJan 18, 1973
Priority dateJan 28, 1972
Also published asDE2204654A1, DE2204654B2, DE2204654C3
Publication numberUS 3835246 A, US 3835246A, US-A-3835246, US3835246 A, US3835246A
InventorsDollmeier G, Muller K, Rauch M, Rindfleisch V, Willasch D
Original AssigneeSiemens Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Television display system for electromagnetic beam apparatus
US 3835246 A
Abstract
An electromagnetic particle beam device, such as an electron microscope, includes a fluorescent screen mounted in the focal plane of the beam for providing a direct image a television camera arranged behind a window in the flourescent screen separately picks up and enlarges the part of the image which falls in the area of the window to permit simultaneous viewing of an overall picture and an electronically enlarged section of the picture.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Muller et a1.

1 1 TELEVISION DISPLAY SYSTEM FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC BEAM APPARATUS Inventors: Karl-Heinz Muller; Volker Rindfleisch; Moriz Von Rauch; Dieter Willasch; Georg Dollmeier, all of Berlin, Germany Siemsre A t e lsc Munich. Germany Filed: Jan. 18, 1973 Appl. No.: 324,798

Assignee:

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Jan. 28, 1972 Germany 2204654 US. Cl 178/6.8, 178/72, 250/311 Int. Cl HOlj 37/26, H04n 7/18 Field of Search 178/68, 7.2; 250/311 [56'] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,894,160 7/1959 Sheldon 250/311 [111 3,835,246 1 Sept. 10, 1974 3,301,949 1/1967 Ullery 178/6.8 3,333,057 7/1967 Berglund 178/68 3,345,514 10/1967 Komoda 250/311 3,614,311 10/1971 Fujiyasu 250/311 Primary Examiner-Howard W. Britton Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Kenyon & Kenyon Reilly Carr & Chapin [57] ABSTRACT An electromagnetic particle beam device, such as an electron microscope, includes a fluorescent screen mounted in the focal plane of the beam for providing a direct image a television camera arranged behind a window in the fiourescent screen separately picks up and enlarges the part of the image which falls in the area of the window to permit simultaneous viewing of an overall picture and an electronically enlarged section of the picture.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PAIENIEDSEPIOIQH 3.835.246

sum 3 a; 4

Fig. 3

TELEVISION DISPLAY SYSTEM FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC BEAM APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to display systems for electromagnetic beam apparatus such as electron microscopes.

When investigating objects by means of electromagnetic particle beam apparatus, for instance, an electron microscope, one is interested on the one hand, in studying the object to the most detailed extent possible, but with increasing magnification, the total area of the object that can be observed becomes smaller. If one wishes to observe both the details and the area surrounding them, it is necessary to use changing magnification. One way to do this is to make and evaluate photographic pictures, which entails a relatively large expenditure of labor and time.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention facilitates the investigation of objects at different magnifications using electromagnetic particle ray apparatus, particularly an electron microscope, which has a fluorescent screen for making the picture projected by the particle ray visible, as well as an arrangement for viewing the picture by means of atelevision camera and a television monitor. According to the invention, the fluorescent screen has a window, and the television camera is arranged in the beam path behind the window for picking up the part of the picture that passes through the window. This permits simultaneous viewing of an overall picture and an electronically enlarged section of the picture.

In specific embodimentsof the invention, the overall picture and the enlarged section of the picture both can be presented to the use on television monitors arranged for convenient viewing by providing a separate television camera to pick up the picture projected on the fluorescent screen. In addition, an observation window can be provided in the wall of the vacuum chamber of the apparatus to allow viewing the fluorescent screen directly, thus avoiding any image degradation by'the television transmission.

The picture projected on the fluorescent screen can be imaged by means of a light-optical lens system on the entrance plane of a television camera. In one embodiment, the television camera for transmitting the enlarged section of the picture can be used by arranging the ray paths of the overall picture and the picture section so that the overall picture and the enlarged section each occupy one-half of the entrance area of the camera. The advantages of this arrangement are that only one transmission channel is required and that the overall and the section picture appear on a monitor side by side. Of course, the overall picture can also be fed to the previously mentioned separate television camera, so that the overall picture and the enlarged sectional picture appear on separate monitors. In either case, the area corresponding to the enlarged section (i.e., the window of the fluorescent screen) appears dark in the overall picture.

At least one mirror may be arranged between the fluorescent screen and the light-optical lens system for directing the overall picture either out of the vacuum chamber into a television camera or within the vacuum chamber toward the television camera which is common for the overall picture and the enlarged sectional picture. It may be advantageous for the arrangement of the light-optical lens system and the mirrors to use a fluorescent screen which is light-transparent (transmission-type fluorescent screen), but the mirror and lens system can also be used to pick up and pass on the picture projected on a reflection-type fluorescent screen. In the latter case, the fluorescent screen is preferably arranged at an angle to the axis of the corpuscular beam to obtain a more favorable ray path.

Although the television monitor for reproducing the enlarged sectional picture may be situated either directly next to the corpuscular-ray apparatus or at any remote location, in one embodiment of the invention the picture screen of the monitor is located behind a second observation window in the direction of view through the first observation window described above for viewing the fluorescent screen. The overall picture and the enlarged sectional picture are thereby presented in close physical relationship for convenient viewing by looking directly at or into the vacuum chamber of the apparatus. For this embodiment of the invention the fluorescent screen is preferably hinged for rotation in the direction of the first observation window to provide a more favorable viewing angle or to pass the particle beam to a photographic recording device mounted behind the fluorescent screen.

In any of the above embodiments of the invention an additional small fluorescent screen can be provided for closing the window-of the fluorescent screen on which the overall picture is produced so that the entire picture can be viewed without the darkened section caused'by the window.

Particularly in conjunction with the embodiment of the invention having two observation windows, it is desirable to provide a device forindicatingthe scale of magnification arranged between the second observation window and the fluorescent screen in such a manner that it is always in theobservers field of view.

The invention will be explained more fully below with reference to the following figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 Shows an embodiment of an electron microscope with two mirrors and one television camera.

FIG. 2 shows another embodiment having one mirror and two television cameras.

FIG. 3 shows an embodiment similar toFIG. 2, in which the mirror is located in front of the fluorescent screen.

FIG. 4 shows a further embodiment with two observation windows and one television camera.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 is a Schematic drawing of an electron microscope l in cross section. An electron beam 8 is generated by meansv of a cathode '2 and an anode cylinder 3 powered by a high-voltage source, not Shown. A magnetic condenser lens 4 focuses the beam on an object 5 which is then magnified by a magnetic objective lens 6 and imaged by a projection lens 7 on a fluorescent screen 10. In the following discussion, this image will be called the overall picture.

The fluorescent screen 10 has a window 12 through which can pass a portion 9 of the electron beam representing a section of the overall picture. The sectional beam 9 is directed toward a television camera 13, which is equipped with an image intensifier 14 and fiber optics 15 having about half of its entrance area provided with a fluorescent layer 16. This half of the entrance area corresponds to the projection area of beam 9. The remaining area 22 of the entrance endof fiber optics 15 is available for the overallpicture, which is transmitted to the television camera 13 in the following manner.

Fluorescent screen 10 is arranged at an angle to the axis of beam 8 and is a transmission-type fluorescent screen (i.e., light-transparent). A first mirror 17 located behind screen 10 reflects theimage which is visible on the lower side of the fluorescent screen approxi mately perpendicularly to the axis of the electron beam. A second mirror 18 picks up the picture and defleets it again approximately parallel to the direction of beam 9. The overall picture is then imaged on the area 20 of the fiber optics 15 by a light-optical lens system 21.

Picture signals are therefore available 'at television camera 13 for the overall picture as well as for the sectional picture. The picture signals are fed to a television monitor 23 via suitable amplifiers, not shown; the monitor shows the overall picture 24 and the sectional picture 25, which appears as a dark area 26 in the overall picture 24.

In the embodiment of FIG. 2 the parts arranged above the projection lens are omitted, and'parts which correspond to those of FIG. 1 are labelled with the same reference symbols.

. As in FIG. 1, a beam 8 produces an overall picture on fluorescent screen 10, while a portion 9 passes through window 12 and furnishes a sectional picture. However, in this embodiment the entire entrance area of television camera 13 is available for this sectional picture. Accordingly, fiber optics 15 is fully covered optics 32. The picture signals are amplified and fed to.

a second monitor 33, which shows the overall picture 24' on the entire picture screen, the sectional picture again appearing as a dark area 26.

An observation window 28 is arranged in wall 27 for direct viewing of fluorescent screen 10. This same arrangement can be provided also in the other illustrated embodiments if desired.

The embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 2 have transmission-type fluorescent screens, the mirrors being arranged behind the screen, as seen in the direction'of the rected toward a fluorescent screen 43 which is hinged for rotation about an axis 44. The fluorescent screen 43 can be observed directly through a first observation window 45 in one side of housing 40. A second observation window 46' is set in the opposite side of housing 40 with a television monitor 47 mounted behind the second window. The observation windows 45 and 46 are arranged so that an observer, whose eye is indicated at 50, can view the fluorescent screen 43 as well as the picture screen'of the monitor 47.

The enlarged sectional picture which appears on the picture screen of the monitor 47 is obtained by a television camera 51 located in the path of electron beam 42 behind a window52 in fluorescent screen 43. An observer can therefore perceive simultaneously the overall picture on fluorescent screen 43 and an enlarged section on the picture screen of monitor 47.

If desired, a photographic recording device consisting of supply and storage magazines for photographic plates with a transport device for selectively placing the plates into the beam path can be mounted behind the fluorescent screen in a known manner to permit photographic records to be made by swinging the hinged screen out of the way.

As an additional feature, window 52 of fluorescent screen 43 can be closed by a second fluorescent screen 54 to permit viewing the entire picture directly without the cutout section caused by the window. In FIG. 4, fluorescent screen 54 is arranged behind fluorescent screen 43, but the same effect can be obtained if the additional fluorescent screen 54 is arranged in front of or is inserted directly into the window. For any of these arrangements, conventional mechanical devices, not shown, can be provided for removably placing fluorescent screen 54 in the area of window 52. As mentioned previously, the additional fluorescent screen can also be'used in the previously described embodiments.

A further feature of the embodiment of FIG. 4 is a device 53, for indicating the scale of magnification of either or both pictures, arranged between the second observation window 46 and fluorescent screen 43 to be in the field of view defined by the first observation window 45. The indicating device can have luminous dials which give the scale of magnification as a numerical value. Alternatively, the indicating device can be mounted outside the vacuum chamber, for instance, in such a manner that it can be read through the observation window 46.

beam. Referring to FIG. 3, a reflection-type fluorescent For magnified viewing of fluorescent screen 43, a magnifying glass is further indicated in FIG. 4. This magnifying glass may be mounted in a fixed position or removably or in such a manner that it can'be directed 'onto any point of the fluorescent screen as required.

The screen can be swung up partially, as shown by the dashed lines, so that it is perpendicular to the line of sight from the magnifying glass to provide sharp focus for the overall picture.

-We claim:

1. In apparatus of the type having a vacuum chamber and means for generating a beam of electromagnetic particles, for directing the beam at a specimen in'the chamber, and for projecting the beam from the specimen, an improved image display system comprising:

a first screen located within the chamber in the path of the projected beam, the screen including material responsive to the beam particles for producing an optical image of the specimen, the material being distributed throughout the area of the screen except for a window section which passes a portion of the projected beam through the screen;

a television camera positioned behind the screen in the path of the passed portion of the projected beam for picking up the portion of the projected image that falls within the area of the window; and

a television monitor connected to the television camera for displaying the image portion picked up by the camera.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising:

a first window located in one wall of the vacuum chamber to permit direct viewing of the first screen and a second window located in a wall of the vacuum chamber within the field of view through the first window, the television monitor being positioned outside the chamber with its viewing screen adjacent to the second window to permit simultaneous viewing of the overall picture on the first screen and the portion of the picture delineated by the window on the television monitor. 3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the first televiaperture having a 4. The apparatus of. claim 3 wherein the area of the entrance aperture of the first television camera is larger than the area of the layer of material responsive to the beam particles for producing an optical image, and the display system further comprises a mirror positioned to reflect the overall image produced on the first screen toward the area of the entrance area that is not covered by the layer of material.

Patent Citations
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US2894160 *Sep 9, 1954Jul 7, 1959Emanuel Sheldon EdwardElectron microscopes
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4071759 *Dec 15, 1976Jan 31, 1978Nihon Denshi Kabushiki KaishaScanning electron device
US4091374 *Aug 31, 1976May 23, 1978Siemens AktiengesellschaftMethod for pictorially displaying output information generated by an object imaging apparatus
US4099055 *Oct 8, 1976Jul 4, 1978Hitachi, Ltd.Scanning transmission electron microscope
US4149074 *Aug 25, 1976Apr 10, 1979Siemens AktiengesellschaftDetector for a scanning transmission-type electron microscope
US4206349 *Nov 30, 1978Jun 3, 1980Hitachi, Ltd.Electron microscope
US4385317 *Mar 26, 1980May 24, 1983Hitachi, Ltd.Specimen image display apparatus
US4532422 *Mar 4, 1983Jul 30, 1985Hitachi, Ltd.Electron holography microscope
US4651200 *Oct 4, 1985Mar 17, 1987National Biomedical Research FoundationSplit-image, multi-power microscopic image display system and method
US4673973 *Feb 4, 1985Jun 16, 1987National Biomedical Research FoundationSplit-image, multi-power microscopic image display system and method
US4769698 *Mar 16, 1987Sep 6, 1988National Biomedical Research FoundationInteractive microscopic image display system and method
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Classifications
U.S. Classification348/80, 250/311
International ClassificationH01J37/22, H01J37/26, H04N5/30
Cooperative ClassificationH01J37/224
European ClassificationH01J37/22C