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Publication numberUS3835270 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1974
Filing dateJun 4, 1973
Priority dateJun 4, 1973
Publication numberUS 3835270 A, US 3835270A, US-A-3835270, US3835270 A, US3835270A
InventorsDufresne W
Original AssigneeItt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Joy stick control mechanism with movable printed circuit switch assembly controlling motor input power polarity
US 3835270 A
Abstract
A control mechanism is disclosed embodying a pivot shaft which controls the supply of power to an electric motor, such as utilized for rotating revolving searchlights. A universal pivotal mounting arrangement is provided for the pivot shaft which does not require a conventional ball and socket joint. When the shaft is pivoted in one direction, it shifts a free-floating printed circuit board to energize the motor. When the shaft is pivoted in the opposite direction, the printed circuit board effects reversal of the polarity of the input power to the motor. In the preferred embodiment, the pivot shaft is pivotal about perpendicularly extending axes to control two electric motors simultaneously whereby a searchlight may be rotated both vertically and horizontally at the same time.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Dufresne JOY STICK CONTROL MECHANISM WITH .MOVABLE PRINTED CIRCUIT SWITCH ASSEMBLY CONTROLLING MOTOR INPUT POWER POLARITY Inventor: Webster J. Dufresne, Costa Mesa,

Calif.

International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, New York, NY.

Assignee:

Filed: June 4, 1973 Appl. No.: 366,705

References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 6/1960 Lybrook et al. 200/6 A 4/1962 Barcus et al. 200/6 A X 5/1963 Wright 200/166 PC X 3/1967 Jonsson 200/6 A X Sept. 10, 1974 3,643,294 2/ 1972 Wilson 200/6 A X 3,644,728 2/1972 Hessemer et a1. 240/619 3,708,636 [/1973 Sobchak 200/6 A 3,736,390 5/1973 Lockard 200/11 DA 3,770,915 11/1973 Bennett et a1. 200/6 A Primary Examiner.lames R. Scott Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Thomas L. Peterson [5 7] ABSTRACT A control mechanism is disclosed embodying a pivot shaft which controls the supply of power to an electric motor, such as utilized for rotating revolving searchlights. A universal pivotal mounting arrangement is provided for the pivot shaft which does not require a conventional ball and socket joint. When the shaft is pivoted in one direction, it shifts a free-floating printed circuit board to energize the motor. When the shaft is pivoted in the opposite direction, the printed circuit board effects reversal of the polarity of the input power to the motor. In the preferred embodiment, the pivot shaft is pivotal about perpendicularly extending axes to control two electric motors simultaneously whereby a Searchlight may be rotated both vertically and horizontally at the same time.

23 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENIED SEP 1 01974 SHEET 2 or 2 JOY STICK CONTROL MECHANISM WITH MOVABLE PRINTED CIRCUIT SWITCH ASSEMBLY CONTROLLING MOTOR INPUT POWER POLARITY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to a control mechanism for an electric motor and, more particularly, to a control mechanism employing a pivotal shaft for controlling electric power delivered to one or a pair of electric motors.

Control mechanisms utilized for revolving lights or similar rotating devices generally employ a pivot shaft which is commonly referred to in the art as a joy stick. Examples of revolving lights which require such a control mechanism are disclosed in US. Pat. Nos. 2,762,994; 2,578,239; and 3,117,302. In such lights, a single motor is employed for rotating the lights about a vertical axis. More recently, revolving lights have been used which will rotate about both vertical and horizontal axes, thus requiring a pair of electric motors for rotating the lights in this manner. A revolving light of this type is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,644,728. The pivot shafts utilized in the control mechanisms for these prior art lights have typically employed conventional ball and socket joints which are relatively expensive or have not been as rugged as is required for some applications. Moreover, the control mechanisms for revolving lights of the type disclosed in the aforementioned US. Pat. No. 3,644,728 have not been capable of providing simultaneous control of power to the two electric motors to permit rapid vertical and horizontal positioning of the lights.

It is, therefore, the object of the present invention to overcome the attendant disadvantages of abovementioned control mechanisms by providing a pivot shaft structure which is relatively rugged, yet inexpensive, and which permits simultaneous control of two motors to provide rapid universal positioning of rotatable elements controlled by the motors.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the principal aspect of the present invention, there is provided a control mechanism for rotatable lights or the like including a pivot shaft which normally lies coaxial with a vertical axis and is pivotal in opposite directions about an axis extending perpendicular to the vertical axis to first and second positions. A fixed insulative plate carrying a pair of contact elements surrounds the pivot shaft. The contact elements are adapted to be connected to an electric motor utilized for rotating the light. Each contact element is formed with a contact engaging area. A laterally shiftable annular printed circuit board is positioned to surround the pivot shaft and engage the contact elements. This board is provided with spaced inner and outer circular conductive layers which face the contact elements. The two layers are adapted to be connected to the positive and negative terminals, respectively, of an electric power supply. When the pivot shaft is coaxial with the aforementioned vertical axis, the contact engaging areas of the contact elements are arranged to lie out of engagement with both the inner and outer conductive layers on the printed circuit board so that no power will flow to the motor. When the pivot shaft is pivoted to the first position, the contact engaging area of one of the contact. elements engages the outer conductive layer on the printed circuit board and the contact engaging area of the other contact element engages the inner conductive layer, whereby power will be supplied to the motor to rotate it in one direction. In the second position of the pivot shaft, the contact engaging area of said one contact element engages the inner conductive layer on the printed circuit board and the contact engaging area of the other contact element engages the outer conductive layer whereby there occurs a reversal of polarity of the power delivered to the motor, thus rotating the motor in the opposite direction. Preferably, the pivot shaft is also pivotal about a second axis perpendicular to the vertical and laterally extending axes so that the pivot shaft is universally pivotal about a central pivot point. A second pair of contact elements, connected to a second electric motor, are positioned on the insulative plate so as to engage the inner and outer conductive layers on the printed circuit board when the pivot shaft is pivoted about the aforementioned perpendicular axis. By this arrangement, the supply of power to the two motors may be controlled simultaneously so as to rotate the light about both vertical and horizontal axes via the two electric motors.

According to another aspect of the present invention, the pivot shaft is mounted axially within a housing formed with aligned bores of different diameter, defining therebetween a flat annular shoulder. An outwardly extending flange is formed on the portion of the shaft lying in the larger diameter bore. This flange is urged into engagement with the annular shoulder by means of a spring, which retains the shaft axially positioned in the bores. The diameter of the shaft in the two bores is less than that of the bores so as to permit the shaft to be rocked or pivoted about an axis extending laterally through the axis of the bores near the flange on the shaft. This structure is relatively rugged and, therefore, withstands heavy loads. It also permits close and positive positioning of the shaft to thereby provide accurate control of power supplied to the electric motors described in the aforementioned control mechanism.

Other aspects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of the control mechanism of the present invention showing the relative position of the pivot shaft with respect to a fixed printed circuit board having contact elements thereon adapted to be connected to a pair of electric motors and a movable printed circuit board having conductive layers thereon adapted to be connected to a power supply;

FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the fixed printed circuit board illustrated in FIG. 1 showing how the pair of electric motors are connected to the contact elements on the board;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary side view of the board illustrated in FIG. 2 taken along line 3-3, showing the configuration of a contact element on the board;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the movable printed circuit board illustrated in FIG. 1 shown connected to a power supply; and

FIG. 5 is a partial longitudinal sectional view through a preferred form of the pivot shaft structure of the present invention embodied in a control mechanism as illustrated in FIGS. 1-4 with the shaft shown in full lines in its normal position; the pivot shaft and the movable printed circuit board are also shown in phantom in the position these elements would assume when the shaft is pivoted from its normal position about one of its laterally extending pivot axes.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings in detail, there is schematically illustrated in FIG. 1 the control mechanism of the present invention, generally designated 10. The control mechanism includes an elongated pivot shaft or joy stick 12 which normally lies coaxial with a vertically extending axis ZZ. The shaft 12 is pivotal in opposite directions about an axis X-X which extends perpendicular to and passes through the vertical axis ZZ. The shaft is also pivotal in opposite directions about an axis Y-Y which passes through the intersection of the XX and ZZ axes and is perpendicular to both of these axes. Thus, the shaft 12 is universally pivotal about point 14 which is the point of intersection of the three axes.

A fixed printed circuit board 16 formed with a central circular opening 17 surrounds the shaft 12 below the pivot point 14. The board 16 is positioned so that the center of the opening 17 therein is coaxial with the vertical axis ZZ. The printed circuit board 16 comprises an insulative substrate 18 on which there are mounted four contact elements 20, 22, 24, 26. As best seen in FIG. 3, each contact element is formed with a downwardly extending resilient arm 28 which is turned up at its end 30 providing therebetween a downwardly facing convex contact engaging area 32. The contact elements 24 and 26 are positioned on the substrate 18 so that their respective contact engaging areas 32 lie on an imaginary straight line AA passing through the center of the hole 17 and thus the axis ZZ. The contact elements and 22 are positioned on the substrate 18 so that their respective contact engaging areas 32 lie on an imaginary straight line BB which is perpendicular to the line A-A and passes through the intersection of the line A-A and the axis Z-Z. The line AA is parallel to the axis XX while the line B-B is parallel to the axis Y-Y. The contact engaging areas 32 of the four contact elements are positioned equidistant from the center of the hole 17 and thus lie in a circular path indicated at 34 in FIG. 2 which is coaxial with the vertical axis ZZ. Conductive layers 36, 38, 40 and 42 on the lower surface of the substrate 18 extend from the bases of the contact elements 20, 24, 22 and 26, respectively, to an outer peripheral region 44 on the substrate. The conductive layers are positioned closely to one another to facilitate the wiring of conductors thereto. The conductive layers 36 and 40 are connected to one electric motor Ml while the conductive layers 38 and 42 are connected to a second electric motor M2. The printed circuit board 16 constitutes a power takeoff board for delivering electric power to motors M1 and M2.

A free-floating laterally movable printed circuit board 50 is positioned below the power takeoff board 16. The board 50 is free floating since it is not secured to any fixed structure and is free to move in any direction in a horizontal plane. The board 50 is in the form of an annular ring having a central circular opening 52 therein which has a diameter greater than that of the shaft 12 but less than that of the opening 17 in the power takeoff board. The printed circuit board 50 is normally positioned coaxial with respect to the axis Z-Z. The board comprises an insulative plate 51. Continuous inner and outer circular layers 54 and 56, respectively, are formed on the upper surface of the plate so as to face the contact elements mounted on the power takeoff board 16. The layer 54 and 56 are spaced radially from one another to provide a nonconductive annular face 58 therebetween. A plated through hole 59 is formed through the board 50 at the inner layer 54. A radially extending conductive strip 62 on the lower surface of the board 50 extends from the outer periphery 64 of the board to the plated through hole 59.

The positive terminal of a power supply 66 is connected to the outer conductive layer 56 and the negative terminal of the power supply is connected, as by soldering, to the strip 62 leading to the inner conductive layer 54 through the plated through hole 59, as best seen in FIG. 4. The printed circuit board 50, therefore, constitutes the power contact board of the contro mechanism 10.

The width of the contact engaging areas 32 on the contact elements 20, 22, 24 and 26 is slightly less than the width of the inner and outer conductive layers 54 and 56 and of the nonconductive annular surface 58 therebetween. With the power contact board 50 normally positioned coaxial with respect to the axis ZZ, the nonconductive annular surface 58 on the board will lie in concentric alignment with the circular path 34 on the power takeoff board so that the contact engaging areas of the contact elements will engage only such nonconductive surface and thus will be out of engagement with both the inner and outer conductive layers 54 and 56. Hence, with the printed circuit board 50 so disposed, no power from the supply 66 will be conveyed to either of the sets of contact elements 20-22 or 2426. If the pivot shaft 12 is pivoted around the YY axis so as to shift the lower end of the shaft in the rightward direction as viewed in FIG. 1, the inner conductive layer 54 on the power contact board 50 will come into engagement with the contact engaging area 32 of the contact element 24 and the outer conductive layer 56 will come into contact with the contact engaging area of the contact element 26 so that current will flow from the power supply 66 through the outer conductive layer 56 to the contact element 26 and from the contact element 26 through the conductive layer 42 on the power takeoff board to one terminal of the motor M2. The current will then flow from the other terminal of the motor through the conductive layer 38, contact element 24 and inner conductive layer 54 on the power contact board back to the supply 66, thereby energizing the motor M2 to rotate in one direction. If the lower end of the shaft 12 is pivoted about the axis Y-Y in the leftward direction as viewed in FIG. 1, the contact element 24 will engage the outer conductive layer 56 on the power contact board and the contact element 26 will engage the inner conductive layer 54, thereby reversing the polarity of the power supplied to the motor M2 and reversing the direction of rotation of the motor. It will be appreciated that when the pivot shaft 12 is pivoted about the axis X--X, the motor M1 will be energized in the same manner as the motor M2.

If the shaft 12 is pivoted about both the XX and YY axes within any one of the four arcuate regions indicated by the angle R appearing in FIG. 1, two of the contact elements will engage the inner conductive layer, and the other two contacts will engage the outer conductive layer on the power contact board so that power will be supplied simultaneously to both the motors M1 and M2. Each arcuate area indicated by the angle R in FIG. 1 covers approximately 30, and the radial limits of the area are disposed about 30 from the XX and YY axes..Thus, the pivot shaft, being universally pivotal about both the axes XX and Y-Y, allows not only independent control of the motors M1 and M2 but also simultaneous control of the motors so that a mechanism which is rotatable about both vertical and horizontal axes, for example, can be controlled for movement about both such axes simultaneously. Also, the control mechanism of the present invention permits reversal of the polarity of the power supplied to both the motors.

Reference is now made to FIG. 5 of the drawings which shows the preferred form of the pivot shaft mounting arrangement of the present invention embodied in a control mechanism as shown schematically in FIG. 1. As seen in FIG. 5, the shaft 12 includes an upper, relatively small diameter section 70 and a lower, relatively large diameter section 72. The pivot shaft is mounted coaxially within a vertically extending bore 74 formed in a support body 76. The axis of the bore corresponds to the axis ZZ in FIG. 1. The support body is mounted on a face plate 78 by a series of screws 80. The bore 74 in the support body includes an upper, relatively small diameter portion 82 and a lower, relatively large diameter portion 84 joined to one another by a flat annular shoulder 86. The shoulder 86 lies in a plane which is perpendicular to the axis of the bore 74. The diameter of the upper section 70 of the shaft is less than the diameter of the upper portion 82 of the bore and the diameter of the lower section 72 of the shaft is less than that of the lower portion 84 of the bore. An annular flange 88 is formed on the lower section 72 of the shaft adjacent to the upper section 70. The outer periphery 90 of the flange 88 is spaced slightly from the wall of the bore portion 84 so as to allow the pivot shaft 12 to rock or pivot about a point generally located at the position indicated by reference numeral 91 which lies on the axis of the bore 74. Preferably the upper, outer edge 92 of the flange is rounded as is the junction of the wall of the lower bore portion 84 and the flat annular shoulder 82 to facilitate rocking action of the shaft 12 within the bore 74.

The power takeoff board 16 is mounted on the lower surface of the support body 76 by a plurality of screws 96. The diameter of the opening 17 in the board 16 is less than that of the lower bore portion 84 so that the inner periphery of the board will extend inwardly from the surface of the bore to define an annular flange 98. A generally conically shaped coiled compression spring 100 is positioned in the lower bore portion 84 with the lower, larger diameter end of the spring engaging the flange 9,8 and the upper, smaller diameter end of the spring engaging the flange 88 on the shaft 12. The upper surface 101 of the flange 88 is flat and lies in a plane which is perpendicular to the axis of the shaft. Thus, it will be appreciated that the compression spring 100 will urge the flat upper surface on the flange 88 into engagement with flat annular shoulder 86 in the support body to normally retain the shaft positioned coaxially within the bore 74.

As will be appreciated from the foregoing, the shaft 12 is capable of being pivoted within the support body 76 by exerting a lateral force against the upper section of the shaft. The shaft will rock about the pivot point 91 in any direction. The point 91 corresponds to the pivot point 14 in FIG. 1. As will be appreciated, the point 91 shifts slightly in the vertical direction in the region of the flange 84 on the shaft due to the arrangement which allows the shaft to make a rocking motion within the support body 76.

The upper portion 102 of the support body 76 extends through an opening 104 formed in the plate 78. A rubber boot seal 106 is engaged with the upper portion 102 of the support body. A handle 108 is mounted on the upper section 70 of the shaft. The boot seal is sealed to the lower surface 110 of the handle so that the interior of the support body is protected from the external environment above the plate 78.

The power contact board 50 is positioned below the power takeoff board 16 and surrounds the lower section 72 of the shaft 12. The diameter of the opening 52 in the power contact board is less than the diameter of the opening 17 in the power takeoff board but slightly greater than the diameter of the lower section 72 of the shaft to provide a sliding fit therebetween. Thus, when the shaft 12 is pivoted, it will engage the board 50 to shift it laterally without engaging the board 16. Preferably the insulative plate 51 of the board 50 is chamfered adjacent the opening 52 to form a knife edge which provides a line contact between the board and the lower section 72 of the pivot shaft. The line contact permits relatively sensitive and accurate control of the position of the power contact board 50 upon pivoting of the shaft 12.

A retaining ring 12 is positioned in a groove 114 adjacent the lower end 116 of the shaft 12. A generally conical shaped coil compression spring 118 surrounds the lower section 72 of the shaft with the lower, smaller diameter end of the spring engaging the retaining ring 112 and the upper, larger diameter end of the spring engaging the lower surface of the power contact board 50, thereby urging the board upwardly into engagement with the contact engaging areas 32 on the contact elements 20, 22, 24 and 26 mounted on the bottom of the board 16.

As stated previously in connection with FIG. 1, the board 50 is normally positioned so that the contact elements on the board 16 will lie between the inner and outer conductive layers 54 and 56, respectively, on the board 50. When the pivot shaft 12 is pivoted about the point from the position shown in full lines in FIG. 5 to the position shown in phantom, the board 50 will be shifted in the leftward direction as viewed in FIG. 5 bringing the inner conductive layer 54 on the board 50 into engagement with one contact element 22 and the outer conductive layer 56 into engagement with the diametrically oppositely positioned contact element 20 whereby power will be supplied to the motor M1. It will be appreciated that by pivoting the shaft about the point 91 in a vertical plane passing through the axis of the bore 74, the inner and outer conductive layers 54 and 56 on the board 50 will come into engagement with the contact element 24 and 26, respectively, thereby energizing the motor M2.

By pivoting the shaft 12 in opposite directions about the point 90, the operator can reverse the polarity of the power supplied to the motors M1 and M2. Also, by pivoting the shaft in the four arcuate areas indicated by angle R in FIG. 1, both the motors M1 and M2 will be energized simultaneously. In addition, because of the pivotal construction of the shaft 12 in the support body 76 described herein, a universal pivoting action is permitted without the requirement of a ball and socket joint. The pivotal arrangement provided by the present invention is relatively inexpensive yet is quite rugged and therefore can withstand relatively heavy loads.

While the control mechanism of the present invention has been specifically described herein for use with revolving search lights, the invention is not limited to such use but may be utilized for controlling input power to one or two motors used for any purpose, such as rotating speakers, antennas or the like.

What is claimed is:

1. A control mechanism comprising:

a support body having a bore therethrough extending from a front face to a rear face thereof, said bore comprising a smaller diameter portion opening at said front face and a larger diameter portion opening at said rear face, said bore portions being joined by an annular shoulder;

a pivot shaft extending axially through said bore beyond said front and rear faces, said pivot shaft having a first section positioned in said smaller diameter bore portion and a second section positioned in said larger diameter bore portion, said first and second sections having diameters less than that of said smaller and larger diameter bore portions, respectively;

an outwardly extending flange on said second section of said shaft near said first section and having a diameter slightly less than that of said larger diameter bore portion providing a clearance space therebetween sufficient to permit said shaft to be pivoted about an axis extending laterally through the center of said second section adjacent said flange;

spring means engaging said pivot shaft to bias said flange toward said annular shoulder to resiliently retain said pivot shaft axially positioned in said bore;

an insulative plate surrounding said pivot shaft adjacent the rear face of said body and being fixed relative to said body;

a pair of contact elements mounted on the side of said plate opposite said body, each contact element being formed with a contact engaging area;

an annular printed circuit board closely surrounding said second section of said pivot shaft, said board having spaced inner and outer circular conductive layers thereon facing said contact elements;

means mounting said board for lateral movement relative to said plate and positioning said board to engage said contact elements;

said contact engaging areas of said contact elements being arranged to lie out of engagement with both said inner and outer conductive layers when said pivot shaft is axially positioned in said bore;

said pivot shaft being pivotal in opposite directions from the axis of said bore to first and second positions;

in said first position of said pivot shaft, the contact engaging area of one of said contact elements engaging said outer conductive layer and the contact engaging area of the other contact element engaging the inner conductive layer; and

in said second position of said pivot shaft, the contact engaging area of said one contact element engaging said inner conductive layer and the contact engaging area of said other contact element engaging said outer conductive area.

2. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 1 10 wherein:

a flange extends radially inwardly into said larger diameter bore portion from said support body adjacent to said rear face; and

said spring means comprises a coiled compression spring surrounding said second section of said pivot shaft with one end of said spring engaging said inwardly extending flange and the other end of said spring engaging said outwardly extending flange on said pivot shaft.

3. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 1 cent the end of said second section; and

said mounting means comprises a coiled compression spring surrounding said second section with one end of said spring engaging said second flange and the other end of said spring engaging said printed circuit board to bias said board into engagement with said contact elements.

4. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 1 wherein:

each said inner and outer conductive layer is a continuous ring,

said outer conductive layer lies adjacent to the outer periphery of said board; and including a plated through hole in said board extending from said inner conductive layer to the surface of said board opposite the surface carrying said layers; and

a radially extending conductive strip on said opposite surface extending from said periphery to said plated through hole.

5. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 1 wherein:

said fixed insulative plate is a printed circuit board mounted on said rear face of said body having an opening therethrough receiving said pivot shaft, said board having conductive layers thereon extending from said contact elements to an outer pe ripheral region of said board.

6. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 1 wherein:

said contact engaging areas of said contact elements are spaced equidistant from the axis of said bore.

said insulative plate carrying a second pair of said contact elements, the contact engaging areas of sald second pair lying on an imaginary straight line generally normal to an imaginary straight line passing through the contact engaging areas of said firstmentioned pair of contact elements; and

one of said imaginary lines being parallel to said firstmentioned axis and the other imaginary line being parallel to said second axis.

8. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 7 wherein:

said contact engaging areas of said first and second pair of contact elements lie in a circular path concentric with the axis of said bore; and

said circular path lies between said printed circuit board inner and outer conductive layers when said pivot shaft is axially aligned in said bore.

9. A control mechanism comprising:

pivot shaft means normally lying coaxial with a vertical axis and being pivotal in opposite directions about an axis extending perpendicular to said vertical axis to first and second positions,

a fixed insulative plate surrounding said pivot shaft means;

a pair of contact elements mounted on said plate, each contact element being formed with a contact engaging area;

an annular printed circuit board closely surrounding said pivot shaft means, said board having spaced inner and outer circular conductive layers thereon facing said contact elements;

means mounting said board for lateral movement relative to said plate and positioning said board to engage said contacts;

said contact engaging areas of said contact elements being arranged to lie out of engagement with both said inner and outer conductive layers when said pivot shaft means is coaxial with said vertical axis;

in said first position of said pivot shaft means, the

contact engaging area of one of said contact elements engaging said outer conductive layer and the contact engaging area of the other contact element engaging the inner conductive layer; and

in said second position of said pivot shaft means, the

contact engaging area of said one contact element engaging said inner conductive layer and the contact engaging area of said other contact element engaging said outer conductive layer.

10. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 wherein said printed circuit board is free-floating and said mounting means including:

means biasing saId board into engagement with said contact elements.

11. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 wherein each said inner and outer conductive layer is a continuous ring,

said outer conductive layer lies adjacent to the outer periphery of said board; and including a plated through hole in said board extending from said inner conductive layer to the surface of said board opposite the surface carrying said layers; and

a radially extending conductive strip on said opposite surface extending from said periphery to said plated through hole.

12. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 wherein:

said fixed insulative plate is a printed circuit board having an opening therethrough receiving said pivot shaft means and having conductive layers thereon extending from said contact elements to an outer peripheral region of said board.

13. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 wherein:

said contact engaging areas of said contact elements are spaced equidistant from said vertical axis.

14. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 wherein:

said pivot shaft means is also pivotal about a second axis passing through said vertical axis and generally normal to said perpendicular axis;

.said insulative plate carrying a second pair of said contact elements, the contact engaging areas of said second pair lying on an imaginary line generally normal to an imaginary straight line passing through the contact engaging areas of said firstmentioned pair of contact elements; and

one of said imaginary lines being parallel to said perpendicular axis and the other imaginary line being parallel to said second axis.

15. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 14 wherein:

said contact engaging areas of said first and second pair of contact elements lie in a circular path concentric with said vertical axis; and

said circular path lies between said printed circuit board inner and outer conductive layers when said pivot shaft is coaxial with said vertical axis.

16. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 14 including:

a power supply having positive and negative terminals;

means electrically connecting one of said terminals to said inner conductive layer and the other terminal to said outer conductive layer;

first and second electric motors;

means electrically connecting said first motor to said firstmentioned pair of contact elements and said second motor to said second pair of contact elements.

17. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 wherein said printed circuit board is free-floating and a flange is formed on said pivot shaft means on the side of said board opposite said conductive layers, and said mounting means including:

a coiled compression spring surrounding said pivot shaft with one end of said spring engaging said flange and the other end of said spring engaging said board to bias said board toward said contact elements.

18. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 9 including:

a power supply having positive and negative terminals;

means electrically connecting one of said terminals to said inner conductive layer and the other terminal to said outer conductive layer;

an electric motor; and

means electrically connecting said motor to said pair of contact elements.

19. A control mechanism comprising:

first and second generally parallel insulative plates;

a pair of spaced contacts on the surface of said first plate facing said second plate, each said contact being formed with a contact engaging area;

spaced inner and outer circular conductive layers on the surface of said second plate facing said first plate;

one of said plates being movable and the other plate being fixed; means positioning said one plate in a central position relative to said other plate, in said central position of said one plate, said contacts on said first plate engaging said surface of said second plate between said spaced inner and outer conductive layers;

means for shifting said one plate from said central position in opposite directions in a plane including said one plate to first and second positions;

in said first position of said one plate, the contact engaging area of one of said contacts engaging said outer conductive layer and the contact engaging area of the other contact engaging said inner conductive layer; and

in said second position of said one plate, the contact engaging area of said one contact engaging said inner conductive layer and the contact engaging area of said other contact engaging said outer conductive layer.

20. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 19 wherein: said shifting means comprises a joy stick coupled to said one plate.

21. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 19 wherein:

said first plate carries a second pair of said contacts on said surface thereof, the contact engaging areas of said first-mentioned and second pairs of contacts lying on two imaginary straight lines, respectively, intersecting one another at a right angle, said contacting engaging areas being equidistant from the point of intersection of said imaginary lines; and said shifting means permitting said one plate to be shifted from said central position outwardly in any direction from said point in said plane. 22. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 21 wherein:

said shifting means comprises a universally pivotal joy stick engaging said one plate. 23. A control mechanism as set forth in claim 21 including:

a power supply having positive and negative terminals; means electrically connecting one of said terminals to said inner conductive layer and the other termina] to said outer conductive layer; first and second electric motors; means electrically connecting said first motor to said first-mentioned pair of contacts and said second motor to said second pair of contacts.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3927285 *Jul 8, 1974Dec 16, 1975L H Frost And Company IncMultidirectional switch with universally pivot actuator for activating plural circuits
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WO2004005766A1 *Jul 3, 2003Jan 15, 2004Eaton CorpA shift lever mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/6.00A, 200/17.00R, 74/471.0XY, 200/16.00R
International ClassificationF21V21/30, H01H25/00, G05G9/00, H01H25/04, F21V21/14, G05G9/047
Cooperative ClassificationG05G2009/04766, G05G2009/04733, G05G9/04785, F21V21/30, G05G25/04, G05G2009/04744
European ClassificationG05G9/047S, F21V21/30, G05G25/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 22, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: ITT CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004389/0606
Effective date: 19831122