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Publication numberUS3835581 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateSep 25, 1972
Priority dateSep 25, 1972
Publication numberUS 3835581 A, US 3835581A, US-A-3835581, US3835581 A, US3835581A
InventorsGrieder C
Original AssigneeGrieder C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Swimming turtle
US 3835581 A
Abstract
The present invention relates to a water toy; and more particularly relates to a turtle-like water toy whose movements simulate the turtle stroke of the real aquatic animal. The subject application discloses a mechanical linkage that causes four turtle flippers to move in a simulated turtle-like manner; thus causing the turtle-like water toy to move through the water in a turtle-like manner.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Grieder Sept. 17, 1974 SWIMMING TURTLE [76] Inventor: Charles K. Grieder, 700 S. Lyon,

Santa Ana, Calif.

[22] Filed: Sept. 25, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 292,061

[52] US. Cl 46/92, 46/119, 46/152 [51] Int. Cl A63h 23/10 [58] Field of Search 46/92, 243 M, 243 MV, 245,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,962,283 ll/l960 Casey 46/92 3,163,960 1/1965 lwaya et a] 46/247 3,503,152 3/l970 Aoki et al. 46/247 Primary ExaminerLouis G. Mancene Assistant ExaminerR0bert F. Cutting [5 7 ABSTRACT The present invention relates to a water toy; and more particularly relates to a turtle-like water toy whose movements simulate the turtle stroke of the real aquatic animal. The subject application discloses a mechanical linkage that causes four turtle flippers to move in a simulated turtle-like manner; thus causing the turtle-like water toy to move through the water in a turtle-like manner.

12 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures SWIMMING TURTLE BACKGROUND There is an ever increasing demand for animated aquatic animals for use in ponds, swimming pools, as water toys, and the like. For convenience, the term water toys will be used as a designation for this general group.

This demand is primarily for simulated animals whose movements resemble the movements of the actual animals. In this respect, one of the most difficult animal movements to simulate is that of a turtle; this animal having a turtle stroke wherein its diametrically opposite feet move simultaneously in the same direction.

Moreover, such a water toy should float in a partially submerged horizontal manner, so that the animals head remains out of the water.

OBJECTIVES AND DRAWINGS It is therefore the principal objective of the present invention to provide an improved water toy.

It is another objective of the present invention to provide an improved water toy that simulates a turtle.

It is still another objective of the present invention to provide an improved water toy that simulates a turtle.

It is still another objective of the present invention to provide an improved water toy whose movements simulate the turtle stroke of a real turtle.

It is a further objective of the present invention to provide a mechanical linkage that simulates a turtle stroke.

The attainment of these objectives and others will be realized from a study of the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the drawings of which;

FIG. 1 shows a cut away pictorial view of the subject turtle water toy;

FIG. 2 shows a top view of the turtle stroke mechanical linkage;

FIG. 3 shows a side view of the turtle water toy;

FIG. 4 shows a cross sectional view of a flipper in its rearward driving movement; and

FIG. 5 shows a cross sectional view of a flipper in its forward recovery movement.

SYNOPSIS Broadly speaking, the present invention discloses a mechanical linkage that causes four turtle flippers to simulate the swimming movements of a turtle; in that the diametrically opposite flippers move together as pairs. While one pair of diametrically opposite flippers are in their rearward driving movement, these particular flippers are given a driving orientation that causes them to produce a water pressure that results in a forward movement of the turtle. Meanwhile, the other pair of diametrically opposite turtle flippers are moving forward in a recovery movement, preparatory for the next driving movement. During this recovery move ment, the flippers assume a flat recovery orientation that minimizes water drag.

THE OVERALL TURTLE FIG. 1 shows a partially cut away view of a turtle body having a head 11, having a floatation chamber in the upper portion of the body, and having a mechanism chamber in the lower portion of the body; the floatation chamber being produced by suitably placed apertures that establish the volume of the floatation chamber. The mechanism chamber and the lower portion of the body 10 contains a mechanical linkage that simulates the turtle stroke; and, furthermore, contains power means for driving the mechanical linkage the power means comprising a motor 12 that also acts as a ballast weight to provide a water line, and causes the turtle to float in an upright position with the turtles head 11 remaining out of the water.

Motor 12 may take any convenient form such as a spring motor, a battery driven motor, or the like.

THE TURTLE FLIPPERS As indicated in FIG. 1, the turtle 10 is shown to have four flippers 15, l6, l7 and 18 that are driven by a mechanical linkage actuated by motor 12. It will be seen from FIG. 1 that the flippers l5 18 are mounted on respective flipper pivots 20 23; these preferably being ball and socket arrangements that will be discussed later; so that the outer portion of the flippers l5 18 are adapted to move in a forward/backward manner. The flippers l5 18 project outwardly from the body 10 through suitable body openings such as 24.

THE FLIPPER LINKAGE FIG. 1 shows a top view of the linkage; and indicates that the four flippers l5 18 are moved by a mechanical linkage that comprises a front pivot bar 25 and a rear pivot bar 26 the pivot bars 25 and 26 being pivotally mounted at their substantially center points on respective bar pivots 27 and 28. Pivot bars 25 and 26 are illustrated as having driving slots 29 through which project respective flipper pins 30 33 that are fixed to the flippers 15 18. As will be shown later, the pivot bars 25 and 26 oscillate in an angular manner around their respective bar pivots 27 and 28; and the flipper pins 30 33 move in their respective driving slots 29, and cause the outer ends of flippers 15 18 to move in a forward/backward manner.

In order to produce the simultaneous movement of the diametrically opposite flippers, as required for a simulated turtle stroke, a linking rod 35 links opposite ends of the front and rear pivot bars 25 and 26.

The motor 12 powers the linkage through a rotating crank arm 36 that is pivotally attached to one end of a connecting rod 37 having its other end pivotally attached to one end of the rear pivot bar 26.

THE LINKAGE OPERATION The overall linkage illustrated in FIG. 1 operates as follows. As the motor 12 rotates, its rotating crank arm 36 drives the connecting rod 37 in such a way that the other end of the connecting rod 37 causes the rear pivot bar 26 to oscillate in an angular manner about its I rear bar pivot 28. The angular oscillation of the rear pivot bar 26 has three effects: namely (I) it causes the rear left flipper 16 to move in a given forward/rearward manner; (II) it causes the rear right flipper 18 to move in a similar rearward/forward manner but in an opposite sense; and (III) it causes the linking rod 35 to produce a similar, but opposite, angular oscillation of the front pivot bar 25. The angular oscillation of the front pivot bar 25, in turn, causes the front flippers l5 and 17 to move in a manner similar to that of the rear flippers.

Thus, the motor 12 and the linkage causes the diametrically opposite pairs of flippers to move in the desired forward/rearward movement.

It will be noted that the described linkage uses a number of pivotal connections, which have been indicated for simplicity of illustration and explanation to be merely pins that traverse suitable apertures. Where desired these pins may have snap in retaining heads that secure the pins in their respective apertures; and such a snap-in structure is advantageously made of plastic that has the characteristic that it will deform slightly during the snapping-in operation. Moreover, since the disclosed linkage is normally submerged, plastic has an additional advantage that it is not affected by water.

THE DRIVING MOVEMENT Attention is now directed to FIG. 2; this drawing i1- lustrating a top view of an instantaneous state of the linkage, which may be mounted on a base 39. At the illustrated instant, the various portions of the linkage are assumed to be moving in directions indicated by the arrows; and it will be seen that the outer end of the front right flipper 17 is indicated to be moving rearward. It will be realized that during this rearward movement of the front right flipper 17, it must produce a driving force that causes the water toy to move forward; and this driving force is produced as follows.

Referring momentarily to FIG. 3, the front right flipper 17 is shown to be tilted; so that as flipper 17 moves rearward, its tilted orientation produces a water pressure that causes the turtle to move forward. The tilting action is obtained in a manner that will be understood from FIG. 4.

The cross sectional view of FIG. 4 shows the outer end of the front pivot bar 25 to be moving forward (as assumed in connection with the previous discussion of FIGS. 2 and 3); the flipper pin 32 projecting through the driving slot 29. FIG. 4 shows the driving slot 29 to have a slanted rear edge 41; so that, as the outer end of pivot bar 25 moves forward, the flipper pin 32 assumes a similar slant or angle as premitted by the ball and socket pivot 22. The flipper 17 therefore also tilts to a corresponding driving angle, as indicated in FIG. 3.

Thus, as the outer end of the flipper 17 is moved rearwardly, it automatically tilts to a driving orientation.

It will be understood that a similar driving effect occurs simultaneously as the diametrically opposite rear left flipper 16 also moves rearward. (A similar effect is also produced when the other flippers are moved rearward). In this way, the water toy is caused to move forward in a turtle-like stroke as the motor powers the linkage and the flippers.

THE RECOVERY MOVEMENT It will be apparent that the above described driving movement is actually a dynamic state that persists for the entire rearward movement of the flipper. Once the rearward driving movement has been terminated, by the flipper reaching its most rearward position, the flipper must now be moved to its most forward position preparatory for another rearward driving movement. During this forward preparatory movement, the above described driving force must be eliminated; this forward movement being designated as the recovery movement.

The flipper recovery movement will be understood by referring back to FIG. 3. This illustration shows the outer end of the rear right flipper 18 to be moving forward; and having a flat orientation.

This flat recovery orientation is achieved as follows. Referring now to FIG. 5, it will be noted that the cross sectional view shows the end of the rear pivot bar 26 to be moving rearward; having the flipper pin 33 projecting through the driving slot 29. FIG. 5 shows the driving slot 29 to have its front edge 42 perpendicular; so that the flipper pin 33 now assumes a perpendicular angle as permitted by the ball and socket joint 23. The flipper 18 therefore now assumes a flat recovery angle.

Thus, as the flipper is moved forward, it automatically flattens out to a flat recovery orientation; and it will be understood that a similar effect simultaneously occurs as the front left flipper 15 also moves forward.

In this way, the forward moving flippers assume a flat recovery orientation preparatory to a subsequent driving movement.

Thus, as the motor actuates the disclosed linkage, the quasi-trapezoidal shape of the driving slot 29 causes its associated flipper to alternately assume driving orientation and a recovering orientation; so that the disclosed linkage provides a driving movement at opposite corners of the water toy, and provides a recovery movemerit at the other corners of the water toy. In this way, the water toy moves forward in a relatively straight line. I claim:

I. The combination comprising:

A swimming animal body;

A floatation means located in said body, for causing said body at the sides thereof to float at a given level in water;

Flippers extending out of said body;

A power source;

A mechanical linkage connected to said power source and said flippers to produce a backward and forward reciprocating stroke;

A chamber located in the lower portion of said body,

for receiving said mechanical linkage; and,

A pivotal connection between said flippers and said linkage having an angular surface for angularly driving said flippers against the water during the drive stroke.

2. The combination of claim 1 further comprising:

A linkage connected to said flippers for causing diametrically opposite flippers on said body to undergo similar forward and rearward movements.

3. The combination of claim 1 further comprising:

A linkage connected to said flippers for causing diametrically opposite flippers on said body to undergo dissimilar forward and rearward driving movements.

4. The combination of claim 1 further comprising:

A connection between said flippers and said linkage for causing diametrically opposite flippers on said body to alternately assume driving orientations and recovery orientations.

5. The combination of claim 1 further comprising:

A crank arm for connecting said mechanical linkage to said power source.

6. The combination as claimed in claim 1 further comprising:

A connection between said flippers and said linkage for recovering said flippers in substantially the same plane of movement of said body to prevent drag during the recovery of said flippers.

7. The combination as claimed in claim 1 wherein said connection between said linkage and said flippers comprises:

A connecting member on said flippers; and,

An angular surface on said linkage for moving said connecting member thereagainst to provide an angular orientation of said flippers for angular driving movement.

8. The combination as claimed in claim 7 wherein:

Said connecting member is a pin.

9. The combination as claimed in claim 6 wherein said connection between said flippers and said linkage comprises:

A connecting member on said flipper; and,

An opening in said linkage having a first angular surface for pushing said connecting member during the recovery of said flipper in substantially the same planar orientation to the movement of said swimming body, and a second angular surface for pushing said connecting member during the driving of said flipper at an angle to the movement of said swimming body.

10. A water toy comprising:

A body having a floatation means in said body for causing said body to float at a substantially given waterline, and having a mechanism chamber positioned in said body at the sides thereof which receives a mechanical linkage and a power source;

Four flippers adapted to extend out of said body;

Means comprising a mechanical linkage, for causing said flippers to produce a simulated stroke;

said mechanical linkage comprising:

A front pivot bar adapted to pivot angularly about a substantial center point;

A rear pivot bar adapted to pivot angularly about a substantial center point;

Said pivot bars having quasi-trapezoidally shaped driving slots at the ends thereof;

A linking rod linking opposite ends of said front and rear pivot bars;

Means comprising said front and rear pivot bars and said linking rod, for causing diametrically opposite pairs of said flippers to have similar driving movements and similar recovery movements; and,

Means comprising said quasi-trapezoidally shaped driving slots for causing said flippers to assume a recovery orientation during said recovery movements.

11. The combination of claim 10 including means, comprising a crank arm, for connecting said mechanical linkage to a power source.

12. The combination of claim 11 including means, comprising a connecting rod, for connecting said crank arm to said mechanical linkage.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2962283 *Oct 12, 1959Nov 29, 1960Earl E CaseyOccupant operated aquatic toy
US3163960 *Feb 28, 1962Jan 5, 1965Marx & Co LouisWalking toy figure
US3503152 *Feb 20, 1968Mar 31, 1970Aoki MasaruDrive system for walking toys
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4342174 *Apr 16, 1981Aug 3, 1982Tomy Kogyo Company, Inc.Floating toy
US4578045 *Jan 30, 1984Mar 25, 1986Cpg Products Corp.Action figure with leg movement derived from arm movement
US4579542 *Jan 30, 1984Apr 1, 1986Cpg Products Corp.Action figure with arm movement derived from leg movement
US4605382 *Feb 8, 1985Aug 12, 1986Cpg Products Corp.Figure wherein leg movement produces wing-like movement of arms
US4608026 *Feb 8, 1985Aug 26, 1986Cpg Products Corp.Figure wherein manipulation of one limb causes motion of another
US6082035 *Apr 13, 1998Jul 4, 2000Groff; Scott A.Turtle device
US6458009 *Jun 7, 2000Oct 1, 2002Chuan-Tien ChuangFishing toy
US6790119 *Jun 27, 2003Sep 14, 2004Francis See Chong ChiaSwimming toy animal
US6860785 *Jun 13, 2002Mar 1, 2005Vap Creative, Ltd.Self-propelled figure
US7727043 *Mar 30, 2007Jun 1, 2010Mga Entertainment, Inc.Curling structure for a simulated aquatic creature and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/158
International ClassificationA63H23/00, A63H23/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63H23/10
European ClassificationA63H23/10