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Publication numberUS3835586 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateJun 21, 1973
Priority dateJun 21, 1973
Also published asCA1022803A1
Publication numberUS 3835586 A, US 3835586A, US-A-3835586, US3835586 A, US3835586A
InventorsBrendel R, Gates H
Original AssigneeGates & Sons
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knock-down window frame
US 3835586 A
Abstract
A knock-down completely reversible, basement window frame is provided having identical top and bottom rails and identical side rails which have slots and tabs at the ends thereof for fitting together to form a rigid window frame. The frame has a central bead for receiving a spring clip which holds both a window sash and screen and a storm sash with the window sash and screen being positioned on the outside of the bead and the storm sash on the inside of the bead so that rain striking the outside of the window sash will run down the bead and back out of the window frame rather than to the inside. A fastener is formed integrally with the upper and lower rails for attaching the window frame within forms for pouring a concrete wall.
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United States Patent Gates et a1.

[451 Sept. 17, 1974 KNOCK-DOWN WINDOW FRAME Inventors: H. Gordon Gates, Denver; Robert Brendel, Aurora, both of Co1o Assignee: Gates & Sons, Inc., Denver, Colo.

Filed: June 21, 1973 Appl. No.: 372,290

U.S. Cl 49/463, 49/504, 52/204, 52/215, 52/489, 249/39 Int. Cl E06b 3/32 Field of Search 49/504, 501, 463; 52/204, 52/213, 215, 484-489; 249/39 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,220,079 11/1965 Aggson 52/204 Primary Examinerl(enneth Downey Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Sheridan, Ross & Fields 5 7 ABSTRACT A knock-down completely reversible, basement window frame is provided having identical top and bottom rails and identical side rails which have slots and tabs at the ends thereof for fitting together to form a rigid window frame. The frame has a central bead for receiving a spring clip which holds both a window sash and screen and a storm sash with the window sash and screen being positioned on the outside of the bead and the storm sash on the inside of the bead so that rain striking the outside of the window sash will run down the bead and back out of the window frame rather than to the inside. A fastener is formed integrally with the upper and lower rails for attaching the window frame within forms for pouring a concrete wall.

6 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures mum SEPI mm SHEET 2 OF 2 KNOCK-DOWN WINDOW FRAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a basement window frame and more particularly to a knockdown window frame which is completely reversible for installation and which takes up less space for transportation and storage than conventional window frames.

2. Description of the Prior Art When concrete walls are poured for basements, it is common practice, prior to pouring the concrete, to position metal window frames between inner and outer concrete forms which are conventionally made up of 4 X 8 plywood sheets wherein the inner form and outer form are interconnected by form ties which reinforce the concrete and serve to keep the forms in alignment. Thus, the concrete is poured around each window frame which is securely held in place by the concrete after it sets so that there is little likelihood of moisture entering the foundation between the window frame and the surrounding concrete. A commercial window frame of this type is disclosed in US. Pat. No. 2,893,235 to Goldberg which issued on July 7, 1959.

Unfortunately, window frames of the abovedescribed type have certain disadvantages Each such commercial window frame has a definite top and bottom and front and back. No matter how plainly marked the frames are, quite frequently one or more window frames will be placed in the forms either upside down or backwards. The error is almost invariably not discovered until after the concrete has been poured and after partial curing of the concrete has taken place and the forms have been removed. In order to rectify the situation, it is necessary to chisel the concrete out around the improperly placed window frame which must then be repositioned correctly within the opening and secured therein by patching with additional concrete. Such a procedure is quite costly and the result highly unsatisfactory since the appearance is unsightly and there is a substantially greater possibility that leakage can occur between the window frame and the concrete which has been used to patch the opening.

Furthermore, the prior art window frames are quite bulky and expensive to ship. Because of their size, only a limited number can be placed on a railroad car even though tariff rates would permit the shippage of a much larger number before the maximum permissable weight allowed on the railroad car is reached. Because of this, the cost per unit for shipping is unnecessarily high. In addition, because of the size of the window frames, they take up substantial storage space in the warehouse prior to use. This results in additional cost in that sufficient storage space must be provided for the window frame which otherwise could be used for other products.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with this invention a completely reversible and separable four-piece window frame for use in a concrete wall poured between spaced forms for receiving at least one window is provided. Such a frame comprises a first pair of identical rails constituting a header member and a sill member and a second pair of identical rails constituting opposite side jambs wherein each of the first pair and second pair of rails are symmetrical and have a central rib forming an abutment for supporting a window sash and each has a web extending from each opposite side of the rib and constructed to taper away from the center of the frame to facilitate placement of the window against the rib, each of the webs terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting the frames to the forms. The window frame further includes interlockable means for rigidly connecting the first and second pairs of rails together to form a complete and symmetrical window frame.

More particularly, the means for connecting the window frame includes a plurality of slots adjacent the ends of one of the pairs of rails and a plurality of tabs adjacent the ends of the other pair of rails receivable in the slots and bendable to lock the tabs in the slots to form a rigid window frame and further the ends of the respective flanges on the other of the pairs are received in slots in the respective flanges on the one of the pairs to form a rigid comer construction. Furthermore, a plurality of brackets are provided for inserting a window sash and screen and storm sash in the window frame which includes a central U-shaped portion receivable over the rib and having spaced legs engaging each side of the rib respectively, afirst strip extending from one of the legs at right angles thereto and terminating in a first in-turned flange spaced from the one leg forming a first recess for receiving an edge of a window sash and a screen in side-by-side relationship and a second strip lying in the plane of the first strip and extending from the other of the legs at a right angle and having a second in-turned flange spaced from the other of the legs to form a second recess for receiving the edge of a storm sash and further includes a handle extending outwardly at right angles from the second flange lying in a plane parallel to the plane of the strips, the handle being movable toward the window frame to bend the bracket so that the second recess is enlarged for removal of the storm window and then being movable in the opposite direction towards the center of the window frame to enlarge the U-shaped portion so that it can be slid over the outer rib to remove the bracket with the window sash and screen therein from inside the window frame. Thus, the window sash can be either inserted or removed from the window frame from inside the basement and when positioned the window sash and screen are on the outside of the rib so that rain or snow beating against the window will run down the rib and out the window frame rather than into the basement. Also, since the first and second pair of rails are identical, the window has no separately identifiable'top and bottom or front and back but can be placed in the forms in any orientation and will always be correct. Furthermore, attachment means are provided in the form of integrally formed prongs bent at right angles to the flanges of at least one of the rails, but preferably the top and bottom rails, so that upon positioning of the assembled window frame between the forms it can be at tached to the forms by striking the backside of the prongs with a hammer so as to drive the prong into the respective forms.

Additional advantages of the invention will become apparent from the description which follows in conjunction with the accompanying drawings:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation of an assembled window frame constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the window frame of FIG.

FIG. 3 is an end view of the window frame of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical section. taken along line 44 of FIG. 1 showing the symmetry of the rails of the window frame showing it installed between inside and outside concrete forms;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, perspective view of a bracket used for holding a window sash, screen and storm sash within the frame;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary section, taken along line 66 of FIG. 1, showing a prong for attaching the frame to the forms;

FIG. 7 is a front elevation of the prong shown in FIG.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary, exploded perspective view showing the corner construction of adjacent rails which make up the window frame of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary section, taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 4, showing the manner in which the bracket holds the window sash, screen and storm sash within the window frame of this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In accordance with this invention, window frame F is provided which includes identical upper and lower rails 2 and identical side rails 4. As best seen in FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 8, upper and lower rails 2 are symmetrical and each has a center rib 6 extending inwardly which serves as an abutment for supporting a window sash and a storm sash when the frame is assembled, as will be more fully explained below. Conveniently, webs 8 extend outwardly and are tapered from each side of rib 6, as shown. Each web 8 terminates in a flange 10 extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting inner form 12 and outer form 14, as seen in FIG. 4. Finally, each of flanges 10 terminate in an in-turned lip 16 which will be imbedded in the concrete after the wall is poured and which serves to strengthen the frame.

The side rails 4 have an identical cross section to upper and lower rails 2 and, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 8, and each includes a central rib 18 from which webs 20 extend and taper from each side thereof and terminate in outwardly extending flanges 22 which each have in-turned lips 24. It can be appreciated that when the window frame is broken down the separate parts can easily be shipped and stored and assembled prior to transportation to the construction site or can even be assembled after arrival on the construction site.

To facilitate assembly, conveniently the ends of rails 2 include transverse slots 26 in opposite ends of flanges 10 as well as slots 28 in webs 8 and a slot 30 in rib 6 as best seen in FIG. 8. Conveniently, the ends of side rails 4 are cut to provide tabs for engagement with the various slots to form a corner joint. Thus, webs 20 are cut down at the ends of flanges 22 to form shoulders 32 which are received in transverse slots 26 of flanges 10 of rails 2. It is this structural arrangement which gives rigidity to the corner structure so that when assembled the rails stay at right angles with respect to each other and form a square window frame. In addition, webs 20 are provided with tabs 34 and rib 18 is provided with a tab 36 which tabs are received in slots 28 and 30, respectively. After the corners are brought into engagement with each other, the tabs 34 and 36 may be bent over with a pair of pliers or a hammer, as best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, so that the parts are no longer separable. Thus, no welding apparatus or special tools are required for assembly.

After assembly, the window frame F can be positioned between inner form 12 and outer form I4 in an appropriate location, as shown in FIG. 4, between form ties 38. Conveniently, the window frames can be held in place by means of prongs 40 which are integral with webs 10 of the upper and lower side rails and are bent to be at right angles therewith so that they may be driven through an opening 42 formed by the construction of prongs 40 so that when the window frame is in place the back side of the prongs can be hit with a hammer so as to drive the sharpened point into inner form 12 and outer form 14, as seen in FIG. 4. Of course, it will be understood that similar prongs could be formed in side rails 4, or prongs could be formed in side rails 4 and not in upper and lower rails 2, if desired.

After the window frames are properly located between the concrete forms, concrete 44 can be poured between the forms and around the window frames F to a suitable height above the window frame. After the concrete has set and partially cured, the forms can be removed by cutting form ties 36 and pulling the forms away from the wall and the window frames. Thereafter, if desired, prongs 40 can be bent over with a hammer so not to present a safety hazard. For convenience of illustration, the window sash 46, screen 48 and storm sash 50 have been shown as being in place in FIG. 4. However, it will be understood that normally these would not be put in place until after the concrete has been poured and the forms removed.

Removable brackets B are provided which hold a window sash 46 and screen 48 in face-to-face relationship with window sash 46 in abutment against the outside edge of ribs 4 and 6 and also hold storm sash 50 against the inside edge of ribs 4 and 6. In normal use, one bracket B is provided on opposite sides of the window frame and engages opposite side rails 4. As seen in FIGS. 4, 5 and 9, each bracket B includes a central U-shaped portion 52 which is receivable over rib l8 and has a first strip 54 extending from one of the legs 56 of the U-shaped portion which terminates in a first in-turned flange 58 spaced from one leg 56 for receiving window sash 46 and screen 48 as shown in FIGS. 4 and 9. If desired, flange 58 can be provided with an inturned edge 60 to more securely engage the frame of screen 48. A second strip 62 extends from the other leg 56 in the same plane as strip 54 and terminates in an inturned flange 64 to form a recess for receiving storm sash 50 and then extends outwardly to provide a handle 66 lying in a plane parallel to the plane of the strips for manipulating the bracket, as described below.

To install window sash 46 and screen 48, they are placed in contiguous facing relationship and a bracket B is attached to each opposite side thereof so that leg 56 engages one side of the frame of window sash 46, and flange 58 engages the opposite side of the frame of screen 48 with lip 60 coming around the edge of the frame, as best seen in FIG. 9. The window sash with the brackets attached to opposite sides is then put through the window frame from the inside of the basement by tipping it and extending it through endwise and then it is brought into alignment with ribs 6 and 18 and the handle 66 of the opposite brackets are grasped in each hand and bent inwardly and pulled inwardly until the U-shaped portion 52 of each bracket engages the ribs 18 on each side of the window frame as also seen in FIG. 9. It will be apparent that if a driving rain strikes the window sash from the outside of the house the water will run down the sash and back out of the window frame due to the fact that the window is located outside the central rib, and and webs 8 slope downwardly and away from the window. In addition, if any rain does get past the window sash it will run down ribs 18 and back out across web 8 on the outside of the window frame rather than running into the basement.

If desired, storm sash 50 can be attached to brackets B by merely springing handles 66 outwardly and inserting the frame of the storm sash into the opposed brackets between legs 56 and flange 64 and in abutting relationship with strip 62 as shown. Thus, both the window sash and the storm sash can be inserted from inside the basement which is highly convenient since basement windows are often below ground level and therefore are surrounded by a window well on the outside making access from this side of the structure difficult if not almost impossible. Also, when the windows need to be cleaned the storm sashes can easily be removed from the inside for cleaning and/or storage during the summertime and of course the regular window sash and screen can be removed by pushing inwardly on handles 66 of spring brackets B, pushing the window sash and brackets outwardly and then tipping the window and pulling it in through the window frame F.

From the foregoing, the advantages of this invention are readily apparent. A knock-down window frame has been provided for use in basement construction which has no front, top or bottom so that it cannot be put in incorrectly. This permits the use of unskilled workmen and also avoids the expense and necessity of having to chip an improperly placed window frame out of a poured basement wall, reposition it and then patch the opening around it. Furthermore, a window sash can be installed from the inside by means of spring clips or brackets so that the window sash is located on the outside of a center rib or bead so that any water which leaks past the window sash during a hard rain will run down the rib and back outside rather than inside as often occurred with prior art windows. In addition, the storm window is positioned on the inside of the window sash and is held in place by the same spring clips or brackets as the outer window sash against the inside edge of the center rib or bead.

A novel corner construction of the window frame is provided which results in a practical knock-down frame. The top and bottom rails have vertical slits for receiving flanges in the side rail together with tabs and a slot arrangementwhich, when assembled, provides a very rigid window frame which remains square. After assembly, the tabs are bent over and no welding or special tools are required. Prongs are formed in the top and bottom rail which extend at right angles thereto and can be used to attach the window frame to con- 6 crete forms by driving the prongs into the concrete form. After removal of the forms the tabs can be bent down so as not to provide a safety hazard.

The invention has been described in detail with particular reference to a preferred embodiment thereof, but it will be understood that variations and modifications can be effected within the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A completely reversible and separable four-piece window frame which has no separately identifiable top or bottom or front or back for use in a concrete wall poured between spaced forms for receiving at least one window, said frame comprising:

a first pair of separate identical rails constituting a header member and a sill member, each of said first pair of rails being symmetrical and having:

a center rib extending inwardly when the frame is assembled and forming an abutment for supporting the window; and

a web extending from each opposite side of said rib and constructed to taper away from the center of said frame to facilitate placement of the window against said rib, each of said webs terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting said frame to the forms; and

a second pair of separate identical rails constituting opposite side jambs, each of said side jambs being symmetrical and having:

a center rib extending inwardly when the frame is assembled and forming an abutment for supporting the window; and

a web extending from each opposite side of said rib and constructed to taper away from the center of said frame to facilitate placement of the window against said rib, said web terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting said frame to the forms; and

cooperating means on said respective first and second pairs of rails which are interlockable for rigidly connecting said first and second pairs of rails together to form a complete and symmetrical and reversible window frame.

2. A window frame, as claimed in claim 1, further including:

means on at least one of said rails for attaching said frame to the forms prior to the pouring of the concrete wall, said attachment means being formed integrally in said flange of at least one of said rails and includes at least one prong bent to extend substantially perpendicular to said flange.

3. A completely reversible and collapsible window frame for use in a concrete-wall poured between spaced forms for receiving at least one window, said frame comprising:

a first pair of identical rails constituting a header member and a sill member, each of said first pair of rails being symmetrical and having:

a center rib extending inwardly when the frame is assembled and forming an abutment for supporting the window; and

a web extending from each opposite side of said rib and constructed to taper away from the center of said frame to facilitate placement of the window against said rib, each of said webs terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting said frame to the forms;

a second pair of identical rails constituting opposite side jambs, each of said side jambs being symmetrical and having:

a center rib extending inwardly when the frame is assembled and forming an abutment for supporting the window; and

a web extending from each opposite side of said rib and constructed to taper away from the center of said frame to facilitate placement of the window against said rib, said web terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting said frame to the forms; and

means for rigidly connecting said first and second pairs of rails together to form a complete and symmetrical and reversible window frame; and

a plurality of resilient brackets for removably retaining at least one window sash in said window frame, said brackets including:

a central U-shaped portion receivable over said rib having spaced legs engaging each side of said rib respectively;

a first strip extending from one of said legs at right angles thereto and terminating in a first in-tumed flange spaced from said one of said legs to form a first recess for receiving an edge of a window sash and a screen in face-to-face relationship;

a second strip lying in the plane of said first strip and extending from the other of said legs at right angles and having a second in-turned flange spaced from said other of said legs to form a second recess for receiving the edge of a storm sash; and

a handle extending outwardly at right angles from said second flange lying in a plane parallel to the plane of said strips, said handle being movable toward said window frame to bend said bracket so that said second recess is enlarged for removal of the storm sash and then being movable in the opposite direction toward the center of said window frame to enlarge said U-shaped portion so that it can be slid over said rib to remove said brackets with said window sash and screen therein.

4. A completely reversible and separable four-piece window frame which has no separately identifiable top or bottom or front or back for use in a concrete wall poured between spaced forms for receiving at least one window, said frame comprising:

a first pair of separate identical rails constituting a header member and a sill member, each of said first pair of rails being symmetrical and having:

a center rib extending inwardly when the frame is assembled and forming an abutment for supporting the window; and

a web extending from each opposite side of said rib and constructed to taper away from the center of said frame to facilitate placement of the window against said rib, each of said webs terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting said frame to the forms;

a second pair of separate identical rails constituting opposite side jambs, each of said side jambs being symmetrical and having:

a center rib extending inwardly when the frame is assembled and forming an abutment for support ing the window; and

a web extending from each opposite side of said rib and constructed to taper away from the center of said frame to facilitate placement of the window against said rib. said web terminating in a flange extending outwardly to form a surface for abutting said frame to the forms;

' plurality of slots adjacent the ends of one of said 5. A window frame, as claimed in claim 4, including:

means on at least some of said rails for attaching said frame to the forms prior to the pouring of the concrete wall wherein said attachment means is formed integrally in said flange of at least one of said rails and includes at least one prong bent to extend substantially perpendicular to said flange.

6. A window frame, as claimed in claim 4, including:

a plurality of resilient brackets for removably retaining at least one window sash in said window frame wherein each of said brackets includes:

a central U-shaped portion receivable over said rib having spaced legs engaging each side of said rib respectively;

a first strip extending from one of said legs at right angles thereto and terminating in a first in-turned flange spaced from said one of said legs to form a first recess for receiving an edge of a window and a screen in side-by-side relationship;

a second strip lying in the plane of said first strip and extending from the other of said legs at right angles and having a second in-turned flange spaced from said other of said legs to form a second recess for receiving the edge of a storm window; and

a handle extending outwardly at right angles from said second flange lying in a plane parallel to the plane of said strips, said handle being movable toward said window frame to bend said bracket so that said second recess is enlarged for removal of the storm window and then being movable in the opposite direction toward the center of said window frame to enlarge said U-shaped portion so that it can be slid over said rib to remove said brackets with said window and screen therein.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3958380 *Mar 6, 1975May 25, 1976Bkl Alloys LimitedBuilding components
US3994470 *Jun 2, 1975Nov 30, 1976Yoshida Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaMold having means for positioning a window frame
US4430831 *May 14, 1982Feb 14, 1984Bowman & Kemp Steel & Supply, Inc.Window buck and frame
US5259586 *May 18, 1992Nov 9, 1993Miller Sr Arthur CMold insert for forming precast concrete modules
US5575870 *Jun 1, 1995Nov 19, 1996Kajima CorporationMethod of making window frame for concrete wall panel
US5591286 *Jul 20, 1994Jan 7, 1997Kajima CorporationMethod of making window frame for concrete wall panel
US5657587 *Sep 7, 1995Aug 19, 1997Rm Base CompanyFloating accessible areaway system
US5687540 *Aug 21, 1995Nov 18, 1997Thomas; Godfrey J. R.Method of finishing window openings
US5740639 *Oct 4, 1996Apr 21, 1998Covington; James B.Double panel storm shutter installation with brace
US6698710Dec 20, 2000Mar 2, 2004Portland Cement AssociationSystem for the construction of insulated concrete structures using vertical planks and tie rails
US6845593Mar 1, 2002Jan 25, 2005Silverline Building Products Corp.Movable window frames having retaining latches
US6904727 *Jul 30, 2001Jun 14, 2005Royal Group Technologies LimitedBasement window system
US7587868Mar 6, 2006Sep 15, 2009Scott HughesMethod of installing windows into a concrete structure
US8407946Aug 10, 2011Apr 2, 2013Steven A. AaronCloset liner
US20050034384 *May 17, 2004Feb 17, 2005Linford Paul M.Window buck with retention flange
USRE43251Jun 6, 2002Mar 20, 2012Anderson Justin JFrame for a wall opening and methods of assembly and use
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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/463, 249/39, 52/215, 52/204.62, 49/504, 52/204.1
International ClassificationE06B5/02, E06B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationE06B5/02
European ClassificationE06B5/02