Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3835693 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateOct 24, 1972
Priority dateOct 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3835693 A, US 3835693A, US-A-3835693, US3835693 A, US3835693A
InventorsA Majersky
Original AssigneeA Majersky
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible straightener for automobile frames
US 3835693 A
Abstract
Improvements in an apparatus for straightening automobile frames in that the new apparatus is mobile and collapsible. The apparatus is mounted on casters and also disassembles for ease in moving and storing. It also allows for pulling the automobile frame in any direction by locating slidable and rotatable brackets on both longitudinal and transverse beams, thus allowing the pulling device to be quickly and easily mounted to enable the application of straightening force in any position around the perimeter of the automobile.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Sept. 17, 1974 COLLAPSIBLE STRAIGHTENER FOR AUTOMOBILE FRAMES [7 61 Inventor: Andrew S. Majersky, RD. No. 4,

Apollo, Pa. 15613 221 Filed: Oct. 24, 1972 21 Appl. No.: 299,809

Takeyasu 269/266 Lunardini 72/705 Primary ExaminerC. W. Lanham Assistant Examiner--M. J. Keenan Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Parmelee, Miller, Welsh & Kratz 52 us. (:1. 72/457, 72/705 [571 ABSTRACT [51] hit. Cl B2111 1/12 Improvements in an apparatus for straightening autol Field Of Search 705 mobile frames in that the new apparatus is mobile and collapsible. The apparatus is mounted on casters and References Cited also disassembles for ease in moving and storing. It

UNITED STATES PATENTS also allows for pulling the automobile frame in any di- 2,559,250 7 1951 Jackson 72 705 Faction by locating Slidable and rotatable brackets 2,646,101 7/1953 Ferguson 72/455 both longitudinal and transverse beams, thus allowing 2,705,040 3 1955 Howick 72 705 the pulling device to be quickly and easily mounted to 3,034,563 5/1962 Gaspar 72/705 enable the application of straightening force in any 3,034,564 5/ I962 Cavazos i 72/705 positign around the perimeter of the automobile, 3,501,938 3/1970 Sprague 72/705 3,518,867 7/1970 Rouis 72/705 6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures 24 /a 26 2 6 24 Q m 21 j L: I1! I @gEIIIfIQlliZi: 1111111121 lg; /2 i g f l /6 5/ M /2' F1 F1 EL I51 I Ii jl\ I 26 50 U 26 181 161 1, I I inn-4g --t J---- 1" PAIENIEMEP 1 71974 SHEET 1 OF 3 COLLAPSIBLE STRAIGHTENER FOR AUTOMOBILE FRAMES FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to new and improved apparatus for straightening the frames on automobiles.

PRIOR ART Apparatus for straightening vehicle frames have long been 'used; however, they generally required personnel using it to make heavy lifts. Further, the types of work which could be performed on this apparatus were limited. Since the types of work were limited, much valuable space was lost when the apparatus was not being utilized.

The prior apparatus have been generally large, heavy, and either stationary or very difficult to move from one location to another and difficult to use quickly.

These problems are solved by this invention, which is mobile, lightweight and constructed low to the ground so that it may be utilized for other types of work, such as body work, without removing the automobile from the apparatus. Further, when the apparatus is not in operation, it can be collapsed and moved out of the way, thus freeing more area for other types of work. The collapsibility is achieved by constructing the apparatus in such a manner that the components may be easily separable.

In addition, the pulling rail may be moved into any position around the automobile, and thus the pulling force may be applied to straighten the frame in any direction.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Apparatus for straightening automobile frames which is highly mobile, easily collapsible, and capable of applying the pulling force in any direction is constructed by mounting two elongated longitudinal main beams on casters and by having two transverse beams connected to the main beams. The first support beam is connected to the first of the main beams by a pivotal mounting, and is connected to the second main beam with removable pins. The pivotal mounting used to connect the second transverse beam is mounted to the end opposite the removable pins of the second main beams. A pulling rail which is mounted on casters is easily connected onto any of the longitudinal main or transverse beams by use of pivotally mounted brackets which mount on each of the beams and are free to slide along the lengths of the main and transverse beams. A holding rail is also easily connected onto any of the main or transverse beams by use of the same pivotally mounted brackets which are mounted on thebeam opposite that on which the pulling rail is mounted. Thus, the pulling force can be applied to theautomobile frame from any direction.

When the unmounted ends of the transverse beams are disconnected, the support beam is pivoted around its mounting until the transverse beam is parallel to the main beam. In this position the two main beams which are mounted on casters may be moved to a close to abutting position, and then the entire apparatus maybe rolled into a storage area.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top view showing the straightening device in phantom lines in its storage configuration and in its operating configuration with puller rail in place;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the straightening device with the pulling rail in place;

FIG. 3 is a partially sectioned view of the mounting bracket mounted on a main beam with the pulling rail mounted;

FIG. 4 is a perspective of the mounting bracket;

FIG. 5 is a partially sectioned view of the casters mounted under the screwjack;

FIG. 6 is a top view of the transverse beam mounting;

FIG. 7 is a side view of the transverse beam mount- FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of the apparatus of the present invention with an automobile disposed thereon.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT FIG. 1 shows the apparatus in its operating configuration with the two main beams 12 substantially parallel and two transverse beams 14 mounted to the main beams by two transverse beam mounts 16. The two transverse beams are locked into place on the main beams by locking pins 18 which are fitted into apertures 20 which are cut through the main and transverse beams. With all the locking pins in place the apparatus is held firmly in an essentially rectangular form. With the apparatus in its operating or extended configuration, a pulling rail 50 is shown mounted to transverse beam 14 by means of a mounting bracket 26 which will be described in fuller detail later. The phantom lines shown in FIG. 1 represent the apparatus as it would be seen in its retracted or storage configuration with transverse beams 14 disconnected from one of the main beams 12 and folded parallel to the main beams 12 as elements 14 and one of the main beams as 12'. In the storage configuration the entire apparatus rests on casters 28 which are held by support plate 24.

FIG. 2 further shows the apparatus in its operating configuration as it rests on its beam supports 31. The pulling rail 50, as shown in FIG. 2, used to apply the straightening force to the bent frame, is resting on its casters which allows the rail to be rolled into position. This force is exerted by a hydraulic jack mounted on the rail shown in FIG. 8. The beam-casters ,28 shown in FIG. 2 are in the up position allowing the apparatus to rest on its beam supports 31. When the apparatus is desired to be moved, the casters 28 on their supporting plate 24 are lowered to the floor by means of a screwjack 22. With its casters down, the apparatus becomes mobile.

FIG. 5 shows more clearly the apparatus for raising and lowering the casters 28. The casters .28 are affixed to ;a support plate 24which is, in turn, connected to a telescoping leg 42. This telescoping leg 42 is affixed to a support plate 40. By rotating the bolt 38 downward, the plate 40 is lifted, lifting the telescoping leg 42 into a sleeve portion 41, thus lifting the castersupport plate 24 and casters 28 off the floor. Tolower the casters .28 back to the floor, the bolt 38 is rotated upward, thus lowering support plate 40,1the telescoping arm .42 an eventually the casters 28.

In changing the configuration of the apparatus from the operating position shown by the solid lines in FIG. 1 to the storage configuration shown by the phantom lines in FIG. 1, the following steps must take place. First, remove the puller rail 50 and holding rail 60 from their mounts on the beams. Second, lower the casters 28 to the floor, thus supporting the apparatus on the casters 28 rather than the supports 31. Third, remove the locking pins 18 from their fittings 20. Fourth, pull the support beam 14 back toward the transverse beam mounts until the connection with the main beam 12 is broken at the unsupported end. Then, rotate slightly counterclockwise the transverse beam and pull the transverse beam 14 forward until it is no longer connected with the main beam 12 at the transverse beam mounted end. In this position the transverse beam is held entirely by the support beam mount 16. Next, rotate the transverse beam 14 clockwise until it is parallel and abutting to the main beam 12. The same operation is conducted for the folding of the second transverse beam 14. When that has been accomplished, the main beams 12 can be pushed together, on its casters 28, and into the storage position. The apparatus which allows the transverse beams 14 to be rotated are the transverse beam mounts 16, one of which is affixed to each main beam 12 facing each other but at opposite ends of the main beams 12. This transverse beam mount 16 shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 consists of a mounting plate 44 with a slotted arc aperture 47. Through this aperture 47 is a headed stud 46 which is affixed to a mounting plate bracket 48 located immediately beneath the mounting plate 44. This mounting plate bracket 48 consists of a C-shaped plate 52, with L-shaped beams 53 affixed to the legs of the C-shaped plate. These L-shaped beams 53 are arranged in such a manner as to define agenerally rectangular beam receiving channel 49 for mounting the transverse beam 14.

The pulling rail 50 and holding rail 60, as mentioned earlier, are mounted to the apparatus by the beams of mounting brackets 26 which are shown in detail in FIGS. 3 and 4. FIG. 3 shows the mounting bracket 26 mounting onto transverse beam 14 by its upper mounting portion 32. This upper mounting portion 32 consists of a C-shaped plate 55 with L-shaped beams 57 mounted to the legs of the C-shaped plate in such a manner that a generally rectangular beam receiving channel 59 is formed. This channel 59 is used to mount the main beam 12 or transverse beam 14 which are conventional I-beams. In this plate 32 is a circular aperture 31 with a headed stud 36 inserted through this aperture 31 and connected to a lower mounting portion 34. This lower mounted portion is constructed the same as the upper portion with a C-shaped plate 55 having L-shaped beams 57 mounted to the legs again forming or defining a channel 59 where the puller rail 50 and holding rail 60 may be inserted, except this position does not have an aperture. Because of the fastening arrangement listed above, the lower portion 34 of the mounting bracket is free to rotate relative to the upper portion 32 which is mounted on the beam. Additionally, because of the channel 59 defined by the legs of the C-shaped plate 55 and L-shaped beam 57, the mounting bracket, and particularly the upper portion 32, slides freely along the main beams 12 of transverse beams 14. The puller rail 50 and holding rail 60 ride freely in and out in the lower portion 34. Because these brackets can slide and rotate, the pulling rail 50 and holding rail 60 can be mounted to the apparatus in any position and in any direction, thus allowing the bent frame of the automobile to be straightened from any direction. Further, because of the mountings listed above, this apparatus can be dismantled and easily put into the configuration for storage, and, in that way, be out of the way saving valuable space within the garage for other work.

The complete apparatus in operating configuration with an automobile shown disposed upon the main beams 12 is shown in FIG. 8. The automobile is held in place on the main beams 12 by holding means 51. The automobile is further held in place by a chain 58 which connects the automobile to the holding rail 60 which is disposed opposite the pulling rail 50. The pulling force is exerted on the automobile by a hydraulic jack 54. The jack is connected to the frame portion of the automobile which is to be straightened by a chain 56. In this configuration, the apparatus frame 10 is resting on its beam supports 31 with its casters 28 in the up position. If it were desirable to straighten the automobile from the side, the pulling rail would be removed from the transverse beam 14 and placed into one of the movable mounting brackets 26 mounted on main beam 12 on the side of the automobile. The hydraulic jack 54 and chain 56 would then be connected to the frame portion which was to be straightened. The holding rail would be moved to a position opposite the pulling rail and mounted also in a mounting bracket 26 and the holding chain 58 then connected. In this configuration, it can be seen that the pulling force can be applied from any position along any of the support beams 14 or main beams 12, thus allowing the frame to be straightened from any direction with relative ease.

I claim:

1. Automobile frame straightening apparatus for use with force applying means such as hydraulic jacks or the like comprising:

a. a pair of longitudinal main I-beams;

b. a pair of transverse l-beams, each transverse beam having a means for connecting each of said transverse beams to one end of each of the longitudinal main beams, each transverse beam being positioned at opposite ends of the longitudinal main beams, connected by a bracket pivotally mounted to the main beam, and so constructed and arranged that the apparatus is selectively positionable into and out of V 1. an extended position wherein the longitudinal main beams are spaced a substantial distance apart to accommodate a vehicle thereon with the transverse support beams substantially normal to the longitudinal main beams and held rigidly in place, and

2. a retracted position wherein the longitudinal main beams are close together and the transverse beams are substantially parallel to the longitudinal main beams;

c. a pulling rail for mounting the force applying means which pulling rail includes a horizontal lbeam portion, and

d. a slidable, pivotable bracket for mounting said pulling rail on any of the longitudinal main beams or transverse beams for selectively applying straightening forces on the automobile frame when the apparatus is in its extended position, which bracket comprises an upper portion channeled to mount said bracket onto the lower flange of said main beams or transverse beams, and a lower portion affixed to said upper portion in such manner that it is free to rotate, and channeled wherein the upper flange of said I-beam portion of said pulling rail can be mounted in said slot.

2. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein the detachable mounting means includes locking pins passing through the other ends of the transverse and longitudinal beams to interconnect them in the extended position.

3. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein said pivotal bracket comprises an upper portion and a lower portion where said upper portion is a mounting plate and said lower portion has a channel adapted to receive the end of said transverse beam, one of said portions having a slotted arc, the other a headed stud which fits in and is free to slide and rotate in said slotted are.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said longitudinal main beams and said pulling rail are mounted on casters, whereby said apparatus can be rolled into a storage area.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said casters mounted on said longitudinal main beams can be retracted when the straightening apparatus is in the extended position and lowered when said apparatus is in the retracted position.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein there is a holding rail mounted on opposite longitudinal main beams and transverse beams, whereby the automobile is held in place when the pulling force is applied.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559250 *Mar 19, 1947Jul 3, 1951Jackson Carter EAutomotive body and frame straightening apparatus
US2646101 *Sep 2, 1949Jul 21, 1953Porter Inc H KAppliance for positioning automobile body parts for repair operations thereon
US2705040 *Aug 19, 1952Mar 29, 1955Howick Walter BAligning device for vehicles
US3034563 *Sep 18, 1959May 15, 1962Joseph J GasparPortable frame straightener
US3034564 *Sep 21, 1959May 15, 1962Cavazos GregorioAuto body and frame straightening machine
US3501938 *Nov 9, 1966Mar 24, 1970Wesley C SpragueDevice for straightening wrecked vehicles
US3518867 *Feb 1, 1967Jul 7, 1970Align Rite IncFrame and unit body straightening machine
US3616676 *May 8, 1969Nov 2, 1971Takeyasu IsaburoJig device for bending shell plating in ship building work
US3625047 *May 27, 1968Dec 7, 1971Alipio LunardiniCar bench
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3927550 *Nov 30, 1973Dec 23, 1975Samuelsson Finmekano AbDevice for straightening deformed vehicles or vehicle parts
US3999419 *Mar 12, 1975Dec 28, 1976Byronn Arvid LarsonBody and frame straightening machine
US4088002 *Jul 10, 1975May 9, 1978G.C. Barnes Tooling And Mfg. Co., Inc.Method and means of straightening cycle frames
US4151737 *Aug 12, 1974May 1, 1979Specktor Gerald AApparatus for repairing and straightening
US4262519 *Nov 16, 1978Apr 21, 1981Applied Power Inc.Vehicle frame alignment apparatus
US4313335 *Nov 23, 1979Feb 2, 1982Kansas Jack, Inc.Vehicle work rack structure
US4336705 *Mar 9, 1979Jun 29, 1982Specktor Gerald AApparatus for repairing and straightening
US4404838 *Jul 23, 1981Sep 20, 1983Hare Charles ESystem for straightening bent automobile bodies
US4510790 *Aug 26, 1982Apr 16, 1985Hare Charles EBody and frame straightening system
US4592225 *Oct 30, 1984Jun 3, 1986Hein-Werner CorporationVehicle repair and alignment rack
US4658627 *Aug 26, 1985Apr 21, 1987Brewer Sr Clarence RIndependent pull tower for vehicle frame and body straightening apparatus
US4794783 *Mar 5, 1987Jan 3, 1989Hein-Werner CorporationVehicle repair and alignment rack
US4854151 *Nov 16, 1987Aug 8, 1989Belgarde Richard JApparatus for realigning vehicle body and frame members
US4920781 *Apr 19, 1988May 1, 1990Chart Industries Ltd.Vehicle repair rack system
US4986107 *Oct 5, 1988Jan 22, 1991Lucien PeyretRack for assembling, inspecting and repairing vehicle bodies
US5752408 *Aug 1, 1994May 19, 1998Huckabee; Donnie L.Support structure for automotive body repair
US6269676Jun 13, 2000Aug 7, 2001Chief Automotive SystemsPortable lift and straightening platform
US6484554Jun 20, 2001Nov 26, 2002Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Portable lift and straightening platform
US7024788May 2, 2001Apr 11, 2006James Herbert MasonDatum point adaptor for vehicle gauging apparatus
US7730758Nov 24, 2008Jun 8, 2010Smith George DVehicular frame straightening apparatus
US20030150124 *May 2, 2001Aug 14, 2003Mason James HerbertDatum point adaptor for vehicle gauging apparatus
CN103085049A *Feb 6, 2013May 8, 2013东风汽车股份有限公司Automobile cab assembling support
DE2628722A1 *Jun 25, 1976Dec 29, 1977Teuvo Olavi VenaelaeinenVehicle chassis maintenance lift - secures to table by raising or lowering latter also actuating retracting plates under wheels
EP0209501A2 *Jun 6, 1986Jan 21, 1987Dataliner AktiebolagWork rack structure
EP0209501A3 *Jun 6, 1986Dec 16, 1987Nicator AktiebolagWork rack structure
EP0269538A1 *Nov 6, 1987Jun 1, 1988Aimé OllierDraw-straighting arm and installation for straightening vehicle bodies or other deformed motor vehicle parts
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/457, 72/705
International ClassificationB21D1/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10S72/705, B21D1/14
European ClassificationB21D1/14