Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3835788 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateMay 31, 1972
Priority dateMay 31, 1972
Publication numberUS 3835788 A, US 3835788A, US-A-3835788, US3835788 A, US3835788A
InventorsElse G, Heisler W, Paul J
Original AssigneeBudd Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrically insulated railway car truck
US 3835788 A
Abstract
An electrically insulated railway car truck for carrying a car body includes an electric motor adapted to drive the truck by means of power from the third rail. The spacing of the electric motor, wiring arrangement and bolster position with respect to the third rail minimize the likelihood of flash-over or shorting of the electrical power to the truck or car body.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Paul et a1. Sept. 17, 1974 [5 1 ELECTRICALLY INSULATED RAILWAY 2,861,654 11/1958 CAR CK 2,908,230 10/1959 2,911,070 11/1959 [75] lnventors: John M. Paul, Holland; William C. 2 912 23 11 1959 Heisler, Glenside; George W. Else, 2,967,915 1/1961 Warminster, all of Pa. 3,286,656 11/1966 3,461,816 8/1969 [73] Ass1gnee: The Budd Company, Phlladelphia,

P V a Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. 1 Flledi y 1972 Assistant Examiner-Howard Beltran [2]] App]. No.: 258,141

[57] ABSTRACT [52] 105/182 105/136 105/139 An electrically insulated railway car truck for carrying 105/199 188/59 191/49 267/3 a car body includes an electric motor adapted to drive [51] m B601 5/38 B61: 9/50 3/04 the truck by means of power from the third rail. The [58] Field of Search 182 B spacing of the electric motor, wiring arrangement and 105/139 199 197 188/59 191/49 267/3 bolster position with respect to the third rail minimize the likelihood of flash-over or shorting of the electri- [561 References Clted cal power to the truck or car body.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,016,073 1 1912 Kiesel, Jr. 191 49 x 7 Claims 8 Drawmg F'gures I maasnaa PAIENTEUSEPI nan SHEU 1 0F 5 PAIENIEHSEPITIHH I 5.835.188

SHEET 3 [1F 5 SHEET 5- BF 5 PAIENIEB sm mu ELECT RICALLY INSULATED RAILWAY CAR TRUCK A typical railway car truck is described in a patent to W.B. Dean US. Pat. No. 2,908,230 entitled Railway Car Truck. The basic body described in connection with the car truck of the present invention incorporates many of the mechanical features shown and described in his patent.

The subject invention is primarily concerned with a railway car truck which includes an electric motor adapted to be driven by power from a third rail. Because of the limited amount of space available for the electrical system, danger involved in flashing from the third rail to the car body or truck, shorting or chafing of the cables, vibrations of the parts present special problems. Special precautions and mechanical arrangements as outlined in this application must be taken to minimize electrical hazards which tend to cause equipment failure and passenger inconvenience.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved truck unit for a car body to be driven by electrical power from a third rail.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an improved truck unit for a car body which includes improved means for securing the driving motor when portions of the truck unit are subjected to irregularities in the track surface during operation.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an improved truck unit including improved means for accommodating heavy car loads if associated air springs fail to function.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an improved truck unit for carrying a car body and including safety features to isolate the source of power from the truck and car body.

In accordance with the present invention, a truck for carrying a car body is adapted to be driven by electrical power from a third rail. A number of protective features for the electrical arrangement is provided. A plastic shield prevents flash-over conditions from the third rail to the truck or car body. The wiring arrangement includes spacers to prevent chafing of the wires when vibrations are encountered. A bolster rod is mounted between the car body and the truck inboard the car body away from the third rail to provide a wide clearance between the bolster rod and the third rail to minimize flash-over. Special secondary springs are included to accommodate heavy loads in case of loss of air in the main air spring.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent and suggest themselves to those skilled in the art, from a reading of the following specification and claims, in which FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a railway car truck, in accordance with the pre'sent invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the main body of the truck used in connection with the present invention;

FIG. 3 is an exploded view disclosing the bolster and spring arrangement used in connection with the main body of the truck, in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the main portions of a third rail shoe mounting assembly, in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view, partly exploded, illustrating the axle and wheel arrangement of the present invention;

FIGS. 6a and 6b illustrate the bolster connection between the truck unit and the car body, in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 7 illustrates the wiring assembly used in connection with the truck, in accordance with the present invention.

In describing the embodiment of the present invention, only one set of elements will be described, it being understood that the arrangement for driving the front axlewheel assembly is substantially similar to the arrangement for driving the rear axle-wheel assembly.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2 a truck 10 includes front and rear wheel-axle assemblies 12 and 14. Suitable disc brake units 16 and 18 are provided for braking the truck. A cylindrical member 15 provides a novel mounting to receive the disc brake driving unit, brackets for a third rail assembly 17 and means for receiving an antenna element (not illustrated).

The main body of the truck includes a pair of side frame members 20 and 22. The side member 20 includes a pair of spider elements 24 and 26 extending inwardly towards the center of the truck. Likewise, the side frame member 22 includes a pair of inwardly extending spider elements 28 and 30 extending toward the center of the truck. The pairs of spider elements are joined near the center of the main body.

A truck bolster member 32 is centrally disposed to rest on the two side members 20 and 22. A pair of pads 34 and 36 are adapted to receive the car body thereon. The pads 34 and 36, and consequently the car body, are normally supported by a pair of air springs 38 and 40. Secondary springs to be described, are included within the air spring to support the car body when the air springs are deflected downwardly beyond predetermined distances.

A motor support member 42 is adapted to hold an electric motor 44 at one end. Various electrical cables 46 are connected between the electric motor 44 and a third rail assembly 48. Power is delivered from the third rail through the assembly 48 and through cables 46 to drive the motor 44. The electric motor 44 in turn is connected through various gear boxes 50 to rotate the wheel-axle assembly in a well known manner. The cables 46 are held and directed by blocks 47. Spacer elements are employed to maintain the cables separate to prevent chafing.

Many of the main mechanical features relating to the truck 10 are found in the prior art including the aforementioned patent of Dean. However, the use of an electrical motor together with high voltage from a third rail has required a number of innovations to provide safety for the relatively high amount of power to be used within the limited space provided. The voltage from the third rail is generally about 750 volts DC.

Referring particularly to FIG. 2 liners 52 and 54 are adapted to rest on the spider elements 24, 26, 28 and 30. These are held in place by means of screws such as screw 56. Vertical liners are adapted to be connected to the end portions 58 and 60. These are secured in place by means of screws such as a screw 62.

A washer 64, a bolt 66, a washer 68 and a lock nut 70 are provided to maintain the axle receiving portion 72 in a locked position. A shock ring 74 is also provided.

A teflon side bearing 76, together with shims 78 are provided to rest on a shoe assembly or side bearing 80. The shoe assembly 80 is adapted to fit over the shock pad 82. This entire assembly is adapted to fit over the central portion of the side frame 22. An additional assembly comprising a lock nut 84, shims 86, a flange plate assembly 88 and a bolt 19 is adapted to be mounted to the bottom portion of the frame 22.

Another assembly adapted to be mounted to the front axle portion of the side frame includes a bracket sanding nozzle 92, a washer 94, a lock nut 96, and a nut 98. Also mounted to the bracket 92 is an assembly including a clamp sanding nozzle support held to the bracket 92 by means of a lock nut 97, a washer 99 and a bolt 101. A spacer 103 is adapted to fit into the nozzle support 100 and held in place by means of a lock nut 105 and a bolt 107. A hose nipple 109, a sanding nozzle 111 and a hose clamp 113 are also adapted to be mounted in the space provided by the clamp sanding nozzle support 100.

Referring particularly to FIG. 3, the air spring arrangement and secondary spring arrangement mounted to the bolster 32 is illustrated. A bottom plate 112 rests on the bolt 32. A pad 122 and a shim are then put in place. The secondary spring 118 is then positioned over the shim 120. The entire assembly is held in place by means of screws such as a screw 119. A bead ring 116 is then placed within apertures within the plate 112 and held in place by means of washers and bolts 132.

The air spring 38 is then placed over the bead ring 116. A second bead ring 115 having a plurality of threaded portions 117 is then placed over the air spring 38. A cover air spring 114 is then placed over the bead ring with the openings in the cover receiving the threaded portion 117 with the assembly being held in place by means of washers 134 and nuts 136. The pad 34 is then placed over the cover 114.

An assembly including a connecting link assembly 122, a shock absorber and leather 124 is mounted to a bracket 127 on the bolster 32. The assembly is held in place by means of a bolt 126 and a nut 128.

A shock absorber is adapted to fit between brackets 129 and held in place by means of a mounting pin 138. Washers 142 and 144 are provided along with a lock nut 146. A lateral bumper element 148 is secured to a bracket 150 which is attached to the top portion of the bolster 32. A shim 152 is provided between the bumper and the bracket with a bolt 154 extending through the bracket 150 to threadedly engage the lock nut 156.

The secondary spring 118 is a flexible elastomer member designed to support the car body in the event that the air springs fail. For example, a car can be continued to be run at approximately 65 mph after the air springs fail with the passengers in the car still riding inrelative comfort. This arrangement is different than systems using vertical bumpers which support the car body when the air springs fail. Such vertical bumpers have been relatively hard and inflexible. In such prior art arrangements, the car is generally not designed to continue to be run because the relatively hardness of the bumpers may cause derailment if bumps in the road or track are encountered.

In a normal operating situation, the pressure in the air spring may be such that the top cover 114 is be tween one and two inches from the top of the flexible member 118. The height of the member 118 may be tween 7 and 8 inches. The spacing between the top cover 114 and the top of the flexible member 118 may be varied in accordance with various load and road conditions.

During operation the system is designed so that the air springs support the car body. However, if unusual conditions are encountered or if the air springs fail, the train can continue to move to its destination on the flexible elastomer springs. If permanent damage to the air springs occur, the train may be moved relatively long distances at somewhat lower speeds.

Referring to FIG. 4 along with FIG. 1, the main elements for the third rail shoe mounting and for insulating the power from the third rail are illustrated, the complete assembly being illustrated in FIG. 1. A plastic shield 178, which may be polyvinylchloride, is attached to end brackets spaced away from the side frame. A wooden beam 180 is adapted to fit into brackets 182 and 184 and holds the shoe assembly including a shoe assembly holder 186, a shoe member 188 and a spring 190. During operation, the shoe 188 is urged into engagement with the third rail. The shield 178 provides high protection against arcing or flashover.

Referring particularly to FIG. 5, a wheel-axle assembly is illustrated. The wheels 168 are mounted to axle 160. The axles are adapted to be driven by the motor 44 through a motor, gear unit and coupling assembly 162. A ground ring 164 and a ground brush holder 166 are provided. Wheel disks are connected to the assembly by means of a locking plate 170 and a cap screw 174. A hubodometer is also provided. The electrical cables 46 for driving the motor are disposed on top of the motor 44. The cables may be provided in blocks and have space therebetween to prevent chafing.

Referring to FIGS. 6a and 6b, a bolster arrangement for connecting the car body 192 to the main body of the truck unit is illustrated. The car body 192 includes a bracket 193 securely mounted thereto. The truck unit includes a bracket 194 secured to the bolster 32. The bracket 194 and bolster 32 are more clearly illustrated in FIG. 3. A bolster rod 196 is connected between brackets 193 and 194. They are held in place by suitable nuts, washers and flexible members. Some of these elements not being illustrated in detail because they are only indirectly related to the present invention.

The bolster rod 196 is disposed inboard of the body 192. It is spaced away from the track 198 and the third rail 200. The inboard arrangement of the bolster rod 196 is disposed longitudinally with respect to the car body 192 and parallel with the track and the third rail. Having the bolster rod beneath the car body in the manner illustrated provides safety feature which minimizes the likelihood of flash-overs from the third rail to the bolster rod 196 or to other parts of the truck or car body. Heretofore the bolster rod 196 was disposed outboard of the car body relatively close to the third rail 200. This tends to cause problems, especially in cases where the body is over loaded causing it to lower its position increasing the likelihood of arcing from the third rail 200.

FIG. 6a illustrates the arrangement as viewed from the front of the car, with FIG. 6b illustrating a view from the side of the car. The bolster rod 196 is generally required so that the momentum of the truck is transmitted to the car body when it is driven by the electric motor. This is necessary because the car body is generally extremely heavy. If the bolster arrangement were not provided, the truck unit would tend to move relative to the car body causing twisting and damage to the various elements between the truck and the car body.

Referring particularly to FIG. 7, an additional safety feature involved in the present invention involves the use of a plurality of blocks 202 spaced with respect to each other. The blocks are used to direct and maintain the various cables 202 separated from each other. A plurality of spacers such as a spacer 206 is disposed between the individual cable 204 to maintain the cables separated between the blocks 202. This minimizes the likelihood of chafing of the cables and any tendency of the cables to become shorted during vibrations of the truck unit.

The various safety features incorporated in the present invention are necessary because of the high density of components within a limited space area of the truck. The high voltage from the third rail requires special precautions to be taken to prevent the power from shorting out to parts of the truck or car body. When the car body is moving at relatively high speed, the electrical elements and cables mounted to the truck tend to vibrate. Over a long period of time these vibrations tend to cause wearing or shorting electrical problems unless the precautions discussed in this application are taken.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination, a railway truck arrangement for providing electrical insulation between parts of a truck and a car body and a source of power to minimize the likelihood of flashover or shorting of the source of electrical power to parts of said truck or car body, said truck supporting said car body and adapted to be driven on tracks by an electrical motor supplied with power from a third rail with the parts of said truck and car body being insulated and positioned from said source of power, said truck including front and rear wheel-axle units, a pair of longitudinal side frames each having a pair of rigid spider portions extending inwardly therefrom, said projecting spider portions being centrally disposed near the center of the center of the longitudinal space between said front and rear wheelaxle units, a bolster member extending between and resting on said side frame members centrally between said front and rear wheel-axle assemblies, a pair of air springs including top covers disposed towards the free ends of said bolster member for supporting said car body, a first bracket mounted to said car body, a second bracket mounted to said main body, said first and second brackets being longitudinally spaced with respect to each other inboard of said wheels and away from said third rail to minimize the liklihood of said bolster coming into contact with said third rail, and a bolster rod connected between said first and second brackets to maintain the relative position of said car body with respect to said truck when said truck is driven by said electric motor, a high deflection relatively large elastomer flexible spring member disposed within each of said pair of air springs to support said car body when said air springs are deflected downwardly beyond predetermined limits to maintain said parts of said truck and car body in positions insulated from said source of power.

2. A railway truck as set forth in claim 1 wherein there is further provided a beam assembly for supporting said electric motor in a suspended position, resilient means connected between said beam assembly and said spider portions of said main body to permit said electric motor to be maintained in a relatively stable vertical position when said main body is subjected to irregular movements resulting from irregularities in said track.

3. A railway truck as set forth in claim 2 wherein a second beam assembly is provided to support a second electrical motor in a suspended position, and second resilient means are connected between said second beam assembly and said spider portions.

4. A railway truck as set forth in claim 3 wherein said beam assembly is disposed toward said front wheel-axle unit and said second beam assembly is disposed toward said rear wheel-axle unit.

5. A railway truck as set forth in claim 4 wherein there are further provided third rail mounting assemblies secured on third rail assembly brackets in spaced relationship to said side frames, each of said mounting assemblies including a wooden beam secured to said third rail assembly brackets for mounting shoe assemblies disposed to contact said third rail, and an insulated plastic shield secured to said wooden beam to minimize the likelihood of power flashing from said third rail to parts of said main body of said railway truck.

6. A railway truck as set forth in claim 5 wherein cables are connected between said third rail shoe assemblies and said electric motors, a plurality of mounting blocks for receiving and directing said cables from said third rail shoe assemblies to said electric motors, and a plurality of spacer elements mechanically attached to portions of the cables between said mounting blocks to minimize chafing of said cables.

7. A railway truck as set forth in claim 6 wherein fulcrum support blocks are included on said main body to receive said brackets for said wooden beam and wherein there is further provided means on said fulcrum support blocks to receive disc brake assemblies and antenna elements.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1016073 *Nov 17, 1910Jan 30, 1912William F Kiesel JrCar-truck.
US2861654 *Jul 10, 1956Nov 25, 1958Budd CoRailway disk brakes
US2908230 *Jan 30, 1956Oct 13, 1959Budd CoRailway car truck
US2911070 *Apr 20, 1956Nov 3, 1959American Steel FoundriesRotor brake
US2912234 *Mar 16, 1956Nov 10, 1959Pullman IncSuspension system air spring
US2967915 *Oct 31, 1956Jan 10, 1961Budd CoMounting for third rail shoe assembly
US3286656 *Jan 2, 1964Nov 22, 1966Gen Steel Ind IncResilient rapid transit truck
US3461816 *Feb 28, 1967Aug 19, 1969Lord CorpElastomeric railway freight car truck bolster spring
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4090454 *Dec 27, 1976May 23, 1978The Budd CompanyWeavable railway truck
US4526108 *Jun 11, 1984Jul 2, 1985Lukens General Industries, Inc.Means for supporting third rail collector gear and the like on inside bearing railway trucks
US4546706 *Nov 18, 1983Oct 15, 1985Lukens General Industries, Inc.Equipment mounting structure for inside bearing railway car trucks
US5119736 *Mar 11, 1991Jun 9, 1992Fi. Re. Ma. System S.P.A.Motor-driven bogie with independent wheels for platform cars
US6343554 *Mar 9, 1999Feb 5, 2002Bombardier Transportation GmbhVehicle wheel, in particular for a low-platform vehicle
US6408766 *Jun 25, 1999Jun 25, 2002Mclaughlin Edward M.Auxiliary drive, full service locomotive tender
US7581502 *Jun 29, 2006Sep 1, 2009Murata Kikai Kabushiki KaishaRail vehicle system and transportation method of using the rail vehicle system
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/34.1, 105/136, 105/139, 188/59, 105/198.1, 267/3, 191/49
International ClassificationB61C9/00, B61C9/50, B61F5/00, B61F5/52
Cooperative ClassificationB61C9/50, B61F5/52
European ClassificationB61F5/52, B61C9/50
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 11, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BOMBARDIER CORPORATION, A CORP. OF IDAHO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:BUDD COMPANY, THE;BUDD COMPANY, THE, A CORP. OF PA;REEL/FRAME:004807/0450
Effective date: 19870914
Owner name: BOMBARDIER CORPORATION, A CORP. OF IDAHO,STATELESS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BUDD COMPANY, THE;BUDD COMPANY, THE, A CORP. OF PA;REEL/FRAME:004807/0450