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Publication numberUS3835821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateJul 27, 1972
Priority dateSep 4, 1970
Publication numberUS 3835821 A, US 3835821A, US-A-3835821, US3835821 A, US3835821A
InventorsCattermole R, Hill W
Original AssigneeLucas Industries Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Petrol injection systems for internal combustion engines
US 3835821 A
Abstract
A petrol injection system for an internal combustion engine has a memory device on which are stored a plurality of sets of information, each set containing a number of coded signals and each of the coded signals representing a different fuel requirement. The delivery of fuel is controlled by a control device in which is stored a control signal which is changed from time to time, but is always obtained from the memory device. One significant signal fed to the engine is used to determine from which sets the signal fed to the control device is obtained, and another significant parameter of the engine is used to determine which coded signal from the chosen set is fed from the memory device to the control device.
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United States Patent 1191 Hill et al.

[ PETROL INJECTION SYSTEMS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES [75] Inventors: William Frank Hill, Stafford; Roger Edward Cattermole, Leicester, both of England [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 69,614, Sept. 4,

1970, abandoned.

1451 Sept. 17, 1974 Aono 123/32 EA Monpetit 123/32 EA Primary Examiner-Laurence M. Goodridge Assistant ExaminerRonald B. Cox Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Holman & Stern [57] ABSTRACT A petrol injection system for an internal combustion engine has a memory device on which are stored a plurality of sets of information, each set containing a number of coded signals and each of the coded signals representing a different fuel requirement. The delivery of fuel is controlled by a control device in which is stored a control signal which is changed fromtime to 52] US. Cl. 123/32 EA, 123/139 E time, but is always Obtained from the memory device- 511 1m. (:1. F02b 3/00 One significant signal fed to the engine is used to [58] Field of Search 123/32 EA, 32 AC termini? from w h ts the signal fed to the control device is obtained, and another significant parameter [56] References Cit d of the engine is used to determine which coded signal UNITED STATES PATENTS from the chosen set is fed from the memory device to 2,356,919 10/1958 Goodridge 123 32 EA the control 3,707,951 1/1973 Bigalke 123/32 EA 4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures \s T l l PETROL INJECTION SYSTEMS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES This invention relates to a petrol injection system for an internal combustion engine and is a Continuation in Part of our application Ser. No. 69,614 filed Sept. 4, 1970, now abandoned.

The ideal quantity of fuel to be injected into an internal combustion engine depends upon the operating conditions of the engine. These may be principally represented for control purposes as engine speed and either throttle opening or the consequent manifold pressure. For convenience, these two parameters, namely speed on one hand and throttle opening or manifold depression on the other hand, are referred to throughout this Specification as significant parameters. The quantity is also affected by engine temperatures and by the immediate past history of engine operation so that it is customery to use temperature signals and signals representing rate of change of throttle opening or of manifold pressure to modify the principal control action. Various means are also known which modify the quantity of fuel to be injected in response to the barometric pressure.

The object of this invention is to provide improved means of determining the quantity of fuel delivered under steady temperature and barometric conditions. However, modification to the quantity of fuel delivered in accordance with variation in temperature and/or pressure and to cater for dynamic conditions of operation can be incorporated in the preferred embodiment, using known means.

A system according to the invention includes a memory device on which are stored a plurality of sets of information, each set containing a number of coded signals representing different fuel requirements, a control device on which is stored a control signal determining the quantity of fuel delivered to the engine, the control signal being obtained from the memory device, means sensitive to one significant parameter for determining from which set the signal fed from the memory device to the control device is obtained, and means sensitive to the other significant parameter for determining which coded signal from the chosen set is fed from the memory device to the control device.

The invention will now be more particularly described with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates diagrammatically one embodiment of the invention, in which the two significant parameters are engine speed and throttle angle,

FIG. 2 is a circuit diagram illustrating one embodiment of the coincidence detector and the timing pulse generator illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is a circuit diagram of one stage of one embodiment of the binary counter illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1,

FIG. 4 is a circuit diagram illustrating a zero re-set circuit which forms part of the binary counter illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1,

FIG. 5 shows the connections between the four stages and the zero re-set circuit of the binary counter illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1,

FIG. 6 is a circuit diagram of one embodiment of the comparator illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1, and

FIG. 7 is a circuit diagram of part of one embodiment of the static register illustrated diagrammatically in FIG. 1.

Referring more particularly to FIG. 1 of the drawings, an engine 11 drives a rotary memory device 12 on which are stored 12 sets of information indicated at 13. Each set 13 of information contains 10 coded signals in the form of eight-bit rows extending across the drum and which are presented in turn to an eight channel reading head 14. The information on the drum could be conveniently in the form of patches which differ from surrounding areas in respect of magnetisation, transparency, reflectivity, protuberance, conductivity or any other parameter conveniently able when used with a suitable reading head, to furnish signals when the drum is rotated. Presence and absence of such a patch in each position of a row may be used to represent a binary l and a binary 0 respectively. The first seven bits of the eight bits in each row presented to the reading head 14 are used to define a quantity of fuel to be delivered to the engine 11. The eighth bit in each row provides a control pulse which is detected by the eighth channel of the reading head 14 and fed to a counter 17 to which the eighth channel of the reading head 14 is connected. The first seven channels of the reading head 14 are coupled to a seven channel static register 15 which on receipt of an input pulse from a bistable circuit 20 an output of which is connected to the register 15 through a capacitor 24, reads the seven bits of information present in the first seven channels of the reading head 14. This digital information is fed to a digitalto-analogue converter 21 which is connected to the outputs of the register 15 and which provides a continuous output signal corresponding to the last seven bits of information received by the static register 15 from the head 14. This analogue signal is fed to a fuel supply control device 22 which meters the quantity of fuel injected into the engine.

One of the sets 13 of information on the drum 12 is designated the first set and when the first row of the first set reaches to reading head 14 it provides a unique datum signal to a coincidence detector-23 which operates only when the unique datum signal is produced, and when operated triggers a timing pulse generator 16 to which an output of the detector 23 is connected and which produces an output pulse of fixed duration. The timing pulse generator 16 has two outputs, one of which is connected to the counter 17 through a capacitor 25 and the other of which is connected to the bistable circuit 20 through a capacitor 26. At the start of the output pulse produced by the timing pulse generator 16, the counter 17 is re-set to zero and thereafter counts the control pulses (ie. the eighth bit in each row). The counter 17 counts from zero to n-l, where n is the number of rows in each set 13 of information and then starts counting from zero again so that irrespective of which of the 12 sets is being read by the head 14, the counter 17 maintains a count corresponding to the row in that set that is being read by the head 14. In the example quoted, the counter 17 must of course count up to nine, and then reset to zero. The signal in the counter 17 is fed to a comparator 18 which also receives a signal from zero to nine from a throttle angle encoder 19. When the comparator 18 receives corresponding signal from the counter 17 and the throttle angle encoder 19 the comparator 18 provides an output signal to the bistable circuit 20.

It will be appreciated that since the encoder 19 produces an output from zero to nine, depending on the throttle angle, and the counter 17 scans from zero to nine for each set 13 of information, the comparator 18 will provide an input signal to the bistable circuit 20 once for each set 13 passing the head 14, each of these input signals attempting to re-set the bistable circuit 20. However, the bistable circuit is only set by the output of the generator 16 after the fixed period of time, following which the next input from the comparator 18 re-sets the bistable circuit, which triggers the register so that the information in the head 14 at the instant when the bistable circuit 20 is re-set is fed to the converter 21 to determine the quantity of fuel to be delivered to the engine 11 until the next time the bistable circuit 20 is reset, at which point the signal in the register 15 will be changed if there has been a change in either of the significant parameters.

Turning now to consider more particularly the tea ing head 14, this provides eight bi-valued parallel signal channels as the drum rotates. The first seven channels provide a parallel digital output collectively used to signify quantity of fuel, except that, out of the 2 possible combinations, one is reserved as a unique datum signal for signifying dnim position. This signal is a full set of binary ls. This unit may be considered to furnish paraphased output signals for each channel. Alternatively, these signals may be derived locally from singleended binary signals where necessary. Preferably, the arrangement of the reading head 14 and the patches on the drum is such that the full set of binary "s furnished by the eighth channel all commence and finish during the period when the first seven channels are fully operated by their corresponding signals. In this way, the sampling of the first seven channels performed by the eighth channel, surpresses transitional portions of the first seven channels.

The coincidence detector 23 and the timing pulse generator 16 will now be more particularly described with reference to FIG. 2 of the accompanying drawings. The coincidence detector 23 comprises an n-p-n transistor 27 the emitter of which is connected to a zero voltage rail 28 and the collector of which is connected through a pair of series connected resistors 29 and 30 to a positive supply rail 31. Eight diodes 32 are provided, the cathodes of which are connected respectively to the eight channels of the reading head 14 and the anodes of which are connected on the one hand to the base of the transistor 27 and on the other hand through a resistor 33 to the rail 31.

The timing pulse generator 16 comprises a pair of p-n-p transistors 34 and 35 the collectors of which are connected to the rail 28 through resistors 36 and 37 respectively and the emitters of which are connected to the rail 31. The base of the transistor 34 is connected on the one hand to the junction between the resistors 29 and 30 of the detector 23 and on the other hand through a resistor 38 to the collector of the transistor 35 whilst the base of the transistor 35 is connected on the one hand to the rail 28 through a fixed resistor 39 connected in series with a variable resistor 40, and on the other hand through a capacitor 41 to the collector of the transistor 34. The collectors of the two transistors 34 and 35 are also respectively connected to a pair of output terminals 42 and 43 of the timing pulse generator l6.

Let us now assume that the reading head 14 furnishes a positive going output signal on each channel, Le. a voltage signal which is substantially positive to represent binary l and is essentially zero when representing binary 0. Only when a full set of binary ls" is read by the reading head 14 does resistor 33 pass base current into transistor 27. However when transistor 27 turns on, conduction in transistor 34 is initiated thereby triggering the monostable flip-flop constituted by the transistors 34 and 35. Base conduction in transistor 34 is re-generatively sustained through resistor 38 keeping transistor 34 bottomed and transistor 35 cut off while capacitor 41 discharges through resistors 39 and 40. After a time pre-settable by resistor 40, conduction in transistor 35 resumes and the circuit re-generatively returns to its prior condition with capacitor 41 rapidly re-charging through resistor 36. Thus, a quasirectangular positive output voltage pulse is produced at terminal 42, and a complementary signal is furnished at terminal 43.

The counter 17 will now be more particularly described with reference to FIGS. 3 to 5 and referring first of all to FIG. 3 there is shown therein a single stage of the counter 17. This stage comprises a pair of n-p-n transistors 44 and 45 the emitters of which are grounded. The collector of the transistor 44 is connected through a resistor 46 to a positive supply rail 47 and the collector of the transistor 45 is connected through a pair of series connected resistors 48 and 49 to the rail 47. The base of the transistor 44 is connected on the one hand through a resistor 50 to the collector of the transistor 45 and on the other hand through a resistor 51 to a negative supply rail 52. The base of the transistor 45 is connected on the one hand through a resistor 53 to the collector of the transistor 44 and on the other hand through a resistor 54 to the rail 52. The collectors of the two transistors 44 and 45 are connected together through a series circuit comprising a resistor 55, two capacitors 56 and 57 and a further resistor 58, the junction of the two capacitors 56 and 57 being connected to a terminal 59 of said stage of the binary counter 17. Moreover, the cathode of a diode 60 is connected to the junction of the resistor 55 and the capacitor 56 whilst the anode of this diode is connected to the junction of the resistors 50 and 51, and the cathode of the diode 61 is connected to the junction of the resistor 58 and the capacitor 57 whilst the anode of this latter diode is connected to the junction of the resistors 53 and 54. Finally, the collector of transistor 44 is connected to a terminal 62 of said stage whilst the collector of the transistor is connected on the one hand to a terminal 63 of said stage and on the other hand to a further terminal 64 of said stage through a diode 65. The junction of the resistors 48 and 49 is connected to a terminal 66 of said stage and a terminal 67 is grounded. The circuit of the aforesaid stage is largely symmetrical, and constitutes a cross-coupled bistable trigger. The condition in which the the transistor 45 conducts is regarded as representing binary O and the other state is used to represent binary l Since the transistors have their emitters at zero potential, the outputs from their collectors are substantially zero or positive. The output at terminal 63 is at substantially zero volts when the counter stage is in the binary 0" state. A complementary output is provided at terminal 62. The counter can be triggered from one state to the other by means of sufficiently large and abrupt negative going voltage transitions at the terminal 59. If the transistor 44 is non-conducting, its collector potential is high. Consequently a large reverse voltage bias is applied through resistor 55 to the diode 60. In contrast, the diode 61 has no large reverse bias, since the collector of the transistor 45 is at approximately zero potential. In consequence, the occurrence of a fast negativegoing excursion of potential at terminal 59 will turn off transistor 45 at its base, by reason of the signal path through capacitor 57 and diode 61. Turning off the transistor 45 triggers the circuit into its other stable stage. The relaxation time constant of the resistor 55 and capacitor 56, as that of its symmetrical counterpart, is chosen to be adequately short compared with the minimum interval between input triggering signals. Consequently, a succession of input triggering signals causes the bistable to trigger successionally to and fro between its two stable states. Positive-going edges at the terminal 59 are ignored by the circuit, since they reverse bias both diodes 60 and 61. An output is provided at terminal 66 and the voltage excursions provided at this output terminal have approximately half the amplitude of the excursions of the collector. Consequently this output is suitable for driving an input terminal of another similar binary counter unit which input signal is similar to the terminal 59 of the present stage. Terminal 64 is a zero re-set input terminal which is normally maintained at the potential of a positive supply rail. In consequence diode 65 is normally nonconducting. Reducing the potential of the terminal 64 to zero loads down the potential of the collector of the transistor 45 thereby ensuring that the transistor 44 is non-conducting and the transistor 45 is conducting. Returning the potential of terminal 64 to that of the positive supply rail again leaves the binary stage in a state where the transistor 45 is conducting, corresponding to a count of zero. This state will be retained by the counter stage until it is next reversed by an input pulse from terminal 59.

A chain of binary counter stages formed by linking output terminal 66 to input terminal 59 of the next stage constitutes a straight binary counter, having a capacity of 2" states, where N is the number of binary stages. The capacity of such a counter may be reduced to a smaller number by adding an automatic zero reset circuit. The counter shown in FIG. 5 comprises four stages 67, 68, 69 and 70 together with a zero reset circuit 71 which is arranged to provide a resetting pulse to terminal 64 of all four binary stages when they achieve the combination of states corresponding to a count of 10.

The zero reset circuit 71 will now be more particularly described with reference to FIG. 4. This circuit 71 comprises a pair of n-p-n transistors 72 and 73 the emitters of which are grounded and the collectors of which are connected together and connected through a resistor 74 to a positive supply rail 75. The collectors of the transistors 72 and 73 are also connected on the one hand to a terminal 76 and on the other hand through a series circuit comprising a capacitor 77 and a pair of resistors 78 and 79 to the rail 75. The junction of the resistors 78 and 79 is connected to the base of a p-n-p transistor 80 the emitter of which is connected to the rail 75 and the collector of which is connected through a resistor 81 to the base of the transistor 72 which is also connected through a capacitor 82 to ground. Four output diodes 83 are also provided and the anodes of these diodes are connected in parallel connected on the one hand through a resistor 84 to the supply rail 75 and on the other hand to the anode of a diode 85 a cathode of which is connected to the base of the transistor 72. The base of the transistor 73 is connected to the junction of a pair of resistors 86 and 87, the other end of the resistor 87 being grounded and the other end of the resistor 86 being connected through a capacitor 88 to an input terminal 89. Referring to FIG. 5 terminal 76 of the reset circuit 71 is connected in parallel to the four terminals 64 of the four stages and the cathodes of the four diodes 83 are respectively connected to the terminal 62 of the stage 67, the terminal 63 of the stage 68, the terminal 62 of the stage 69 and the terminal 63 of the stage 70, the diodes 83 forming an And gate. The counter 17 is arranged to be reset when it reaches a count of 10 (which in binary form is indicated by 0101) and by reason of the connection between the cathodes of the diodes 83 and the stages 67, 68, 69 and it will be seen that transistor 72 of the zero reset circuit 71 will conduct when the counter reaches a count of 10 and the monostable constituted by transistors 72 and 73 will be triggered causing the potential of terminal 76 to descend temporarily from that of the positive supply rail to approximately zero thereby affording a signal suitable for re-setting the binary counter stages to zero. By suitable design, the duration of this resetting pulse is substantially shorter than the shortest interval between input pulses to the counter. This time is determined by the relaxation time constant associated with capacitor 77. Capacitor 82 enables the coincidence input signal to transistor 72 to be briefly persistent in order to prevent the possibility of very fast re-setting of one binary stage removing the coincidence from transistor 72 before the re-generation process via transistor 73 is effectively established. The duration of a re-set pulse from terminal 76 is by suitable design adequate to override inter-stage carry signals within the counter. Transistor 73, normally nonconducting, is also able to trigger the re-set pulse generator, being rendered briefly conducting by a positivegoing excursion of potential of the input terminal 89 which is coupled to the base of transistor 73 by a pulse forming differentiating network. This terminal 7 is of course connected through the capacitor 25 through the timing pulse generator 16 and the input terminal 59 of the stage 67 is connected to the eighth channel of the reading head 14. In operation input terminal 89 receives abrupt positive going excursions from the collector output of transistor 34 of the timing pulse generator 16 thereby causing the counter 17 to be re-set to zero by the leading edge of the timing pulse produced by the generator 16.

Turning now to the comparator 18 this will now be more particularly described with reference to FIG. 6 of the accompanying drawing. The comparator 18 comprises four n-p-n transistors 90, 91, 92 and 93 the collector emitter junctions of which are connected in parallel with the emitters grounded and the collectors connected through a resistor 94 to a positive voltage supply terminal 95. An output terminal 96 of the comparator is connected to the junction between the resistor 94 and the collectors of the transistors 90, 91, 92 and 93 and an output signal is received at the terminal 96 only when all the transistors 90, 91, 92 and 93 are turned off. The bases of the transistors are connected to similar circuits only one of which is illustrated connected to the base of the transistor 90. Each of these circuits comprises a pair of n-p-n transistors 97 and 98 the emitters of which are grounded. The collectors of the transistors 97 and 98 are connected respectively through resistors 99 and 100 to input terminals 101 and 102 respectively. The base of the transistor 97 is connected through a resistor 103 to the terminal 102 and the base of the transistor 98 is connected through a resistor 104 to the terminal 101. The collectors of the two transistors 97 and 98 are connected together through a pair of series connected resistors 105 and 106 the junction of which is on the one hand connected through a resistor 107 to ground and on the other hand to the base of the transistor 90. The input terminals 101 of the four similar circuits are connected to the corresponding signal channels of the inputs from the encoder 19 whilst the four input terminals 102 of the four similar circuits are connected to the corresponding signal channels of the inputs from the counter 17. Moreover, the output terminal 96 of the comparator is connected to an input of the bistable circuit 20.

In use, the signal applied to each of the terminals 101 and 102 is bi-valued, being either at approximately zero potential or at a substantial positive potential. The transistor 97 receives base current through resistor 103 from input terminal 102 when the signal applied to this terminal is positive, and a collector supply voltage is applied through resistor 99 from terminal 101 when this is positive. Thus, the collector potential of transistor 97 is approximately zero except when a positive potential on terminal 101 and zero potential on terminal 102 are simultaneously present. A supply voltage to the collector of transistor 97 through resistor 105 from terminal 102 is only present when the latter terminal also makes transistor 97 conducting. In like manner, the collector potential of transistor 98 is substantially positive only when a positive input to terminal 102 co-exists with a zero input to terminal 101. The transistor 90 receives base current through resistor 105 whenever the collector potential of transistor 97 is substantially positive, and likewise receives current via resistor 106 unless the transistor 98 is bottomed. Thus, transistor 90 will be nonconducting only when both transistors 97 and 98 are bottomed, i.e. when input terminals 101 and 102 are in corresponding state.

Turning now to the static register 15, this consists of seven bistable circuits of which one is shown in FIG. 7. This bistable circuit comprises a pair of n-p-n transistors 108 and 109 the emitters of which are grounded and the collectors of which are connected through a pair of resistors 110 and 111 respectively to a positive voltage supply rail 112. The base of the transistor 108 is connected on the one hand through a resistor 113 to a negative voltage supply rail 114 and on the hand through a resistor l to the collector of the transistor 109. The base of the transistor 109 is connected on the one hand through a resistor 116 to the supply rail 114 and on the other hand through a resistor 117 to the collector of the transistor 108. Five terminals 118, 119, 120, 121 and 122 are provided, the terminal 121 being grounded and terminal 120 being connected to the collector of the transistor 109. The terminals 118 and 119 are connected together through a series circuit comprising a resistor 123 a pair of capacitors 124 and 125 and a further resistor 126, the junction of the two capacitors 124 and 125 being connected to the terminal 122. Finally, a pair of diodes 127 and 128 are provided,

the cathode of the diode 127 being connected to the junction of the resistor 123 and the capacitor 124 and the anode of the diode 127 being connected to the base of the transistor 108, whilst the cathode of the diode 128 is connected to the junction of the resistor 126 and the capacitor 125 and the anode of the diode 128 is connected to the base of the transistor 109. Each of the seven bistable circuits receives paraphased d.c. inputs representing one channel of the reading head output and all receive a common read pulse input, a negative going edge derived from the output of the bistable circuit 20. Each of the seven bistable circuits provide a dc. output to the digital-to-analogue converter 21. When the input signifies binary 0, approximately zero potential is applied to input terminal 118 by the reading head output which also applies a substantial positive potential to terminal 119. In consequence, a negative going excursion of the potential applied to terminal 122 turns off transistor 108 by conduction in diode 127, whilst diode 128 is blocked by the reverse bias applied through the terminal 119. This leaves the bistable circuit in the state in which the transistor 109 is conducting, and the output potential at terminal 120 is approximately zero. This state is maintained irrespective of further input at terminal 122 for so long as the dc. inputs to terminals 118 and 119 remain the same.

' If these d.c. inputs reverse values, then the bistable will change into its other stable state at the next negative going edge received at terminal 122, thereby changing over the binary signal presented at output terminal 120. As aforesaid, the static register 15 consists of seven identical bistable circuits. In operation this set together sample the first seven channels of the output of the reading head 14 present at the instant when an input signal is received at terminal 122 at all the bistable circuits of the register at the instant when the bistable circuit 20 is reset. The register will therefore furnish at its output terminals a signal representing the input to the register 15 at the last previous instant of sampling.

Both the digital-to-analogue converter 21 and the encoder 19 may be of any convenient known form. By way of example, a suitable digital to analogue converter is shown in Page 675 of the book pulse, digital and switching waveforms published in 1965 by McGraw- Hill. A suitable encoder is the Baldwin model 57a described in the magazine Instruments and Control Systems for May, 1970.

Going through the operation of the above disclosured circuitry step by step so as to further facilitate understanding thereof, one may initially suppose that the drum l2 performs a complete revolution/cycle of the engine and that the engine has a top speed of just under 6,000 rpm. i.e. just under 3,000 (four stroke) cycles/- minutes. Accordingly, the drum completes nearly a full revolution at full engine speed in a period of H50 th second, i.e. 20 ms. The unique datum signal provided by the first row of the first set of digits stored on the drum may conveniently be a full set of eight binary l s so that each time this reference row of information passes under the reading head 14 a coincidence signal is detected by the detector 23 and the pulse generator 16 is accordingly triggered to produce a pulse which could conveniently be 20 mS in duration. Hence when the trailing edge of this timing pulse occurs, the drum will have travelled an angular distance past the position in which the datum signal was presented to the reading head 14, proportional to the prevailing speed of the engine, a distance which is almost a full revolution when the engine is at a maximum. In consequence, by suitably positioning a given row of information on the memory drum it is possible to arrange that this row appears under the reading head 14 in time coincidence with the trailing edge of the timing pulse whenever the engine is running at a particular speed. For example, a row of information positioned at 180 away from the datum row would arrive at the reading head 14 in time coincidence with the trailing edge of the timing pulses produced by the timing pulse generator 16 when the engine is running at approximately half full speed.

In practice it is necessary to have several rows of information for controlling the fuel supply to the engine for each engine speed, so as to enable a selection to be made depending upon throttle opening, and in the version above described these sets of information are stored on consecutive rows of the drum. The eighth channel of the reading head 14 furnishes a pulse for every row of information on the drum. As the rows of information constituting each such set are presented serially to the reading head 14 it is necessary to include means of selecting the correct row of information and to transfer it to the static register so as to make it continuously available for control purposes until it is next revised. This is accomplished by the arrangement including counter 17 which is re-set to zero at the commencement of the timing pulse, i.e. at the moment when the datum row is under the reading head 14 and thereafter counter pulses furnished by the eighth channel of the reading head 14, one for each row of the drum information. The capacity of the counter 17 is arranged to be equal to the number of rows in each set of information on the drum hence the state of the counter maintains correspondence with the ordinal position in its set of the row currently presented to the reading head. The digital throttle position encoder l9 furnishes signals to the digital comparator 18 which also receives signals representing the state of the counter 17. Each signal combination furnished by the throttle angle encoder 19 corresponds to a small range of throttle angles and the corresponding quantity of fuel is represented by the information on the row presented to the reading head 14 when the counter 17 is in a corresponding state to the signal furnished by the throttle angle encoder. In other words the ordinal position in its set of a given row of information on the drum corresponds with a particular state of the counter 17, and for the corresponding set of signals from the throttle angle encoder furnished by it when the relevant range of throttle angles is obtained. If it is supposed that the engine is rotating at half its full speed then the trailing edge of the timing pulses produced by the timing pulse generator 16 will occur as explained earlier when a portion of the drum about l80 away from the datum row is presented to the reading head 14. If we suppose that the start of a set of information arrives at the reading head at this instant then we can think of successive rows of this set passing the reading head, with the eighth channel causing the contents of the counter 17 to maintain correspondence until it achieves the state corresponding with the signal combination currently furnished by the throttle angle encoder. Upon arrival of this row of drum information under the receiving head 14, comparator 18 provides the pulse re-setting bi-stable circuit 20 andcausing the information currently presented to the reading head 14 to be transferred to the static register 15 by reason of the pulse furnished to the register 15 from the bi-stable circuit 20 at this moment.

The trailing edge of the delay pulse produced by the timer 16 sets the bi-stable circuit 20, the re-setting of which provides a shift pulse for accepting digital information from the reading head 14 into the static register 15.

Clearly, if the fifth row of drum information was specified by the prevailing throttle angle encoder signal combination and the trailing edge of the delay pulse produced by the timing pulse generator 16 occurred when the sixth or later row of particular set is under the reading head 14 then the arrangement described would sample the fifth row of the next set of drum information to arrive at the reading head 14. The disposition of the sets of information on the drum is preferably arranged so as to minimise the errors thus introduced in representing engine speed. It will be seen that the arrangement described enables a particular row of information selected by the approximate engine speed and throttle opening of the engine to be reproduced in the static register 15 and to be revised if necessary 1 per revolution of the drum. This continually updated digital information is furnished to the digital-to-analogue converter 21 used to control suitable fuel dispensing means at the engine, for example pulse timing means for controlling electro-magnetic switching valves used in known forms of petrol injection.

It should further be appreciated that the information which would be typically found on one information set on the memory drum and the form of the information is as follows. The eighth channel consists of a complete row of binary ls and the other seven channels in each row a coded (e.g. binary) representation of a number signifying fuel shot size or quantity.

It will be understood that the number of sets of information on the drum 12, the number of bits in a row, and the number of rows in a set can all be varied, to suit the accuracy requirements of the system. The encoder 19 must of course have a number of outputs equal to the number of rows in a set. In order to achieve high accuracy with a relatively small memory device it is possible to arrange for the output from the static register 15 to be used as a trimming adjustment to the engine fuel control, which is primarily controlled by a separate system, which may for example, be responsive only to manifold pressure.

In a modification, the number of signals produced by the encoder 19 is equal to the numberof sets of information on the drum 12, and the counter 17 is operated only by the first row in each set, so that the counter 17 indicates the set passing the head 14 at any instant, and re-sets to zero when all the sets have passed the head 14. When the signals from the counter 17 and encoder 19 are equal, the comparator 18 sets the bi-stable circuit 20 and also starts a timer, which operates for a fixed period at the end of which the bistable circuit 20 is re-set to trigger the register 15. The fixed period is less than the time taken for a set to pass the head 14 even at maximum engine speed, and it will be'seen that the throttle angle will determine which set is selected, and the engine speed will determine which row in the set is utilized.

Other known forms of digital memory device can of course be used in place of the drum l2.

We claim:

1. A petrol injection system for an internal combustion engine having first and second significant parameters including a digital memory device on which are stored a plurality of sets of information, each set containing a number of digital coded signals representing different fuel requirements, a control device in which is stored a digital control signal determining the quantity of fuel delivered to the engine, the control signal being obtained from said memory device, means responsive to said first significant parameter for determining from which set the digital signal fed from the memory device to the control device is obtained, and means sensitive to said second significant parameter for determining which digital coded signal from the chosen set is fed from the memory device to the control device, each coded signal including a bit of information operating a counter which runs from zero to (n-l) and then re-sets, where n is the number of coded signals in a set, said means sensitive to said second significant paramemter being in the form of an encoder having one of n outputs corresponding to the n readings of the counter, the system including a comparator which compares the outputs of the counter and the encoder and produces an output pulse each time the outputs are equal, so that one output pulse is produced for each set of information passing a given point, and a timing device which is initiated by a signal from one set of information and operated for a fixed period, after which the next output pulse from the comparator causes a signal to be fed from the memory device to the control device to constitute the control signal.

2. A petrol injection system for an internal combustion engine having first and second significant parameters, including a digital memory device on which are stored a plurality of sets of information, each set containing a number of digital coded signals representing different fuel requirements, a control device in which is stored a digital control signal determining the quantity of fuel delivered to the engine, the control signal being obtained from said memory device, means responsive to said first significant parameter for determining from which set the digital signal fed from the memory device to the control device is obtained, and means sensitive to said second significant parameter for determining which digital coded signal from the chosen set is fed from the memory device to the control device, each set of information including a bit of information operating a counter having m readings, said counter running from zero to (ml) and resetting, said means sensitive to said first significant parameter being in the form of an encoder having one of m outputs corresponding to the m readings of the counter, the system including a comparator which compares the outputs of the counter and the encoder and produces an output pulse when the outputs are equal, the output pulse operating a timer which operates for a fixed period which is less than the time taken for a set to pass a given point even at maximum engine speed, a signal being fed from the memory device to the control device to constitute the control signal at the end of said fixed period.

3. A system as claimed in claim 2 in which the first and second significant parameters are engine speed and throttle opening respectively.

4. A system as claimed in claim 2 in which the first and second significant parameters are engine speed and manifold pressure respectively.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2856910 *Apr 23, 1956Oct 21, 1958Acf Ind IncFuel injection system
US3707951 *Sep 30, 1970Jan 2, 1973Volkswagenwerk AgStorage control for gasoline injection installations of combustion engines
US3720192 *Sep 9, 1970Mar 13, 1973Nissan MotorControlling device for fuel injection of an internal combustion engine
US3720193 *Apr 13, 1971Mar 13, 1973Sopromi Soc Proc Modern InjectMethod and apparatus for coding and reading data governing the duration of energization of fuel injection in an internal combustion engine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3935846 *Sep 3, 1974Feb 3, 1976Daimler-Benz AktiengesellschaftInstallation for the digital-electronic control of inlet, exhaustion and injection valves as well as of the injection in internal combustion engines
US4143622 *Nov 17, 1976Mar 13, 1979Robert Bosch GmbhFuel injection apparatus for internal combustion engines
US4195599 *Apr 25, 1977Apr 1, 1980The Bendix CorporationSpeed sensitive electronic fuel control system for an internal combustion engine
US5435835 *Jan 6, 1994Jul 25, 1995Bethlehem Steel CorporationMethod and system for removing and/or causing recycling of materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/486
International ClassificationF02D41/24, F02D41/30, F02D41/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02D41/30, F02D41/2406
European ClassificationF02D41/30, F02D41/24D