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Publication numberUS3836058 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateAug 31, 1972
Priority dateSep 24, 1971
Publication numberUS 3836058 A, US 3836058A, US-A-3836058, US3836058 A, US3836058A
InventorsPenniman R, Snelling R
Original AssigneeBarreca Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mounting rack for skis or the like
US 3836058 A
Abstract
The invention contemplates a novel rack construction, as for carrying skis or the like on the roof or other exterior part of a vehicle. Plural pairs of skis are vertically clamped, back-to-back, by like pairs of relatively movable upstanding post members, and a single lockable actuator at one end of the rack is operative to set or to release all post pairs in unison. In the form disclosed, each pair of posts comprises a fixed post and a movable post, and the movable posts are all ganged in their connection to the single actuator.
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[451 Sept. 17, 1974 United States Patent [191 Penniman et al.

[ MOUNTING RACK FOR SKIS OR THE LIKE 21 1/64 X 294/8726 UX 294/87 R X 224/421 F 2,782 973 2/1957 Lang............... 7 960 Inventors: Robert Penmman, Jericho; Richard 5 9x962 Snelling, Shelbume, both of Vt. 3:086:688 4/1963 Vikre 73 Assigneez Barreca Products Shelburne 3,606,l ll 9/1971 Gjesdahlnunn Vt.-

. Primary Examiner--Robert J. Spar [22] Flled' 1972 Assistant Examiner-Jerold M. Forsberg or FirmSandoe, Hapgood and t n e g n mm 0 "a AC m a D n 0 a c H n. 0. 2A s S U m oh m m. P A l l 2 .l

[57] ABSTRACT The invention contemplates a novel rack construction,

[63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 183,550, Sept. 24,

1971, abandoned.

[52] 224/41-1 211/60 SK, 280/1137 as for carrying skis or the like on the roof or other ex- 4 3, 0DA6 7/ 8 2 04 7 ZM i 1 W H4 "1 9 M2 2., .,4 MM W2 7 mm "m m .m4 Q 9 "S20 "cl/6 m a d2 m 2 IF terior part of a vehicle. Plural pairs of skis are vertically clamped, back-to-back, by like pairs of relatively movable upstanding post members, and a single lockable actuator at one end of the rack is operative to set or to release all post pairs in unison. In the form dis- B closed, each pair of posts comprises a fixed post and a movable post, and the movable posts are all ganged in [56] References C'ted their connection to the single actuator.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 29 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PAIENIEDSEP 1 71914 SHEET 1 BF 3 1 MOUNTING RACK FOR SKIS OR THE LIKE This application is a continuation-in-part of pending application Ser. No. 183,550, filed Sept. 24, 1971, now abanded.

Our invention relates to rack constructions for carrying skis or the like on the roof or other exterior part of a vehicle.

Several general types of ski racks are in use today, but each is beset with disadvantages and unnecessary limitations. Generally, these disadvantages reduce to uneven clamp action, insecure clamp action, and too few skis served by a single lock and key.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved construction, avoiding the disadvantages and limitations of prior constructions.

Another object is to provide an improved rack of the character indicated having greater and more-efficient ski-carrying capacity.

A further object is to provide an improved ski rack in which all ski-clamp regions are actuable in a single operation, and from one side of the vehicle.

Still another object is to meet the above objects with a construction in which ski-clamp action is uniform at all ski-clamp regions.

A still further object is to provide a construction of the character indicated with inherent ability to operate in the presence of ice accumulations.

A general object is to meet the foregoing objects with a construction of basic simplicity, inherent low cost, and offering maximum security against tampering and thievery.

Other objects and various further features of novelty and invention will be pointed out or will occur to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following specification, in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. In said drawings, which show, for illustrative purposes only, a preferred form of the invention:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an automobile rooftop installation of two ski racks or carriers of the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary, perspective view of the actuating end of the rear-mounted one of the racks of FIG. 1, shown for the open position, for reception or removal of skis;

FIG. 3 is a simplified fragmentary perspective view of the rack of FIG. 2, partly broken away, to reveal internal parts and their cooperation;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken at 44 in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view in perspective for certain of the actuating parts of the rack of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is an end view of the actuating mechanism, for the closed condition as seen by cutting the mechanism at 6-6 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken at 77, in the other rack of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 2 to show a modified rack construction of the invention;

FIGS. 9a and 9b are planform views of control elements in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged perspective view of a resilient ice-deflecting member used in the construction of FIG.

FIGS. 1 1 and 12 are similar fragmentary views in side elevation, showing use of the member of FIG. 10, for the ski-clamping condition and for the ski-unclamping conditions, respectively;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a reinforcing element for use in a modification of the member of FIG. 10; and

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view of the complete member embodying the reinforcing element of FIG. 13, the same being centrally cut to reveal the cross-section of the reinforced construction.

Referring to FIG. 1, the invention comprises an elongated frame member or bar 10, being one of two frame members l010 for any given installation, as to the roof ll of an automobile. The frame members 10-10 may be duplicates of each other, but in the preferred fonn, their similarity is in initial appearance only, as will later become more clear.

Frame members 10 may be straight but are shown slightly arched or centrally bent, for general conformance with the contour of roof 11. Frames 10-10' stand upon spaced feet or pads 12, which may be of molded rubber or the like, preferably incorporating suction-cup formations for greater hold of a given footing. Pinned connection at 13 to frame 10 enables a limited degree of contour-conforming pad articulation, depending upon the particular vehicle. Anchoring straps 14 carried by frames 10-10, near their ends, enable lateral stability, as through connection to the rain gutter 15 of the sedan model shown. The means for attachment and adjustment of straps 14 with respect to frames 10-10 form no part of the invention and will therefore not be described, beyond identifying at 16 (FIG. 2) tool-engageable means whereby the anchoring tension may be set for strap 14.

In accordance with the invention, like pairs of adjustably clamped upstanding posts are provided in spaced relation along the length of frame 10, the number of such pairs being the desired maximum number of pairs of skis to be accommodated. In FIG. 1, the respective pairs of posts are generally identified A-B F, for a capacity of six pairs of skis. The left-hand post member 20 (FIG. 2) of each of the pairs A through F is one of a first plurality (six) of duplicates, fixedly spaced with respect to each other and carried by frame 10; similarly, the right-hand post member 21 of each of the pairs A through F is one of a second plurality (six) of duplicates, fixedly spaced with respect to each other and carried by frame 10, at locations interlaced with those of the first plurality. These pluralities are movable with respect to each other such that, in a first position, all corresponding pairs of ski-post members 20-21 are in closed, ski-engaging, adjacency (FIG. 1) and that, in a second position, all corresponding pairs of ski-post members 2021 are open, i.e., sufficiently spaced for ski removal and insertion. Movable actuator means, such as a toggle-actuating or control arm 22 carried at one end of frame 10, reacts between the first and second pluralities 20-21, for selectively moving the same from and to the first and second positions. Preferably, arm 22 is down and aligned with frame 10 for the first or ski-clamping position; and in the form shown, the posts 20 of the first plurality are fixed to the frame, while the posts 21 of the second plurality have a common ganged actuating connection to the control arm 22.

Specifically, frame 10 includes elongated guide means, formed in the course of extruding the frame material, for example aluminum. The basic extruded section appears in FIGS. 3 and 4 and is generally H- shaped, having spaced inwardly flanged upstanding side members or walls 23-24, connected by a central web 25, and thus defining an upwardly open channel and a downwardly open channel. The lower channel will be understood to accommodate anchor straps 14 and their adjustment mechanism, symbolized 16. The upper channel, which features upper flanges 26 and a depressed groove or trough 27 (in web 25), is relied upon for support and guidance of the post systems 20-21.

All posts 20-21 may be duplicates of each other, being preferably metal castings. Above frame 10, the post structure is a generally C-shaped arm 28, rising from a flat base 29 and terminating with a flat platform 30. Post means 31, rigidly fixed to base 29 and platform 30, includes an outersheath of yieldable protective material, such as rubber or a suitable plastic, for firm but harmless compressed and resiliently loaded engagement with an inserted ski. Beneath the upper surface of frame 10, an integral tail 32 projects downward, for guidance by and between flanges 26 and by and between the sidewalls 33 of the central depression 27 (of web 25); integral wings 34 project laterally beneath flanges 26. Snapped-in extruded-plastic liners 35-35 (as of polyethylene) are fitted to the respective flanges 26 for smooth low-friction and rattle-free support of posts 20-21 on the guide means 26.

As noted above, all posts (20) of the first plurality are secured in spaced relation, and all posts (21) of the second plurality are also secured in similarly spaced relation, the first plurality being frame-referenced and the second plurality being control-arm actuated. In the form shown, a first or anchor strap 37 performs the first of these functions and a second or actuating strap 38 performs the second of these functions; straps are preferably of stainless steel and are stiff but sufficiently flexible to conform to the arch or bend of frame 10. Strap 37 is secured, as by riveting 39, to a concealed part of each of the posts 20 of the first plurality; strap 38 is similarly secured, as at 40, to the remaining posts 21. Straps 37-38 are laterally offset on opposite sides of the tail 32, beingaccommodated in the respective spaces beneath the wings 34 and the web shoulders 41, from which the groove 27 depends. The fixed reference for strap 37 may be achieved by riveting the ends thereof to the adjacent shoulder 41, as shown at 42 for the exposed end in FIG. 2.

Of the various available mechanisms for actuating strap 38 and, therefore, posts 21, a simple toggle is preferred, wherein arm 22 is pivoted to the sidewalls 23-24 on a horizontal pin 43 (FIG. 2). For firm reference, top flanges 26 are locally cut away at the region of accommodating arm 22, and arm 22 is a channel having downward side flanges 44 which fit closely but freely between walls 23-24. Pin 43 preferably passes through both walls (23-24) and both flanges (44) in such manner that in the down position of arm 22, the exposed surface of arm 22 is flush with the upper surface of frame 10. Arm 22 is shown with an enlarged head or cap 45, of section conforming to the external limits of the extruded section 10, so that the flush appearance with section is complete when in the down" position (FIG. 1). A toggle link 46 is pinned at 47 to trunion formations in arm 22; at its other end, a pin 48 connects link 46 to a slide member 49 (see also FIG. 5). Slide 49 pilots on the elongated depression 27 and is stabilized between the flanks 33 thereof. A simple offset bracket may be the means of connecting the actuating strap 38 with slide 49, but in the form shown in FIG. 5 a local cut-out 50 in the edge of strap 38 locates against the respective end edges of the slide trunion 51 by which pinned connection to link 46 is established. Assembly may be locally retained by one or more pins 52, headed for permanent retention over straps 37-38 in the region of motion of slide 49 and positioned so as not to interfere with longitudinal motion of slide 49, it being noted that straps 37-38 are of sufficient width to overlap the side-flange regions of slide 49.

The described toggle mechanism need be provided only at the indicated single end of the rack frame 10, since toggle actuation simultaneously controls the open or closed position of all ski-post pairs A through F. The other end of frame 10 may therefore be permanently closed by a suitable cap 53, riveted or otherwise fixed to frame 10 (see FIG. 1).

The other rack frame 10 may be an exact duplicate of frame 10, but as indicated above, such complexity is neither necessary nor desired. Preferably, frame 10 utilizes the same basic extrusion and anchor-strap (14) mechanism as does frame 10, for uniform appearance. However, as seen in FIG. 7, the upper channel of frame 10' (complete with its plastic liners 35-35') is used for permanent retention of an elongated mounting strip 55 to which like inverted U-shaped retaining hoops 56 are anchored, at spaced locations A-B F, corresponding to the locations A through F already described for frame 10. Preferably, hoops 56 are of bent steel rod, coated with a vinyl sheath for protection of inserted skis.

In the preferred use of the invention, rack 10' is located forward and rack 10 is to the rear, as shown in FIG. 1. A pair of skis, held bottom-to-bottom and set on edge, is inseted, tail first, into one of the hoops 56, as at station A, to an extent assuring slight compression of the skis on each other. The rack (10) to rack (10') spacing is selected to sufficiently accommodate the boot-binding region of the skis, so that the main body of the skis (forward of the binding region) may be simply dropped into the space between opened posts 20-21, at the corresponding location A of frame 10. The tips of the skis then project substantially toward the rear of the vehicle, as shown. When the requisite number of other pairs of skis has been similarly applied to the hoops 56 and posts 20-21 at remaining stations B-B, C-C, etc. the arm 22 is actuated downward and may be locked, as by a single key operated mechanism, suggested at 57 in FIG. 2, and operative to selectively dog the toggle mechanism as by clamping to a projecting end part 58 of frame 10. In the course of setting the clamps, slide 49 will be displaced longitudinally outwardly, and may project to a limited extent within cap 45; the skis are all engaged by posts 31 well before the clamps are set. Slight differences in thickness of the different skis are accommodated by the yieldable texture of sheathing on posts 31, but all post pairs are subjected to the same clamp action, by reason of the ganged actuating connection 38. Location of the axes is essentially a single horizontal plane, close to strap 38 when arm 22 is down, assures retention of the clamped condition, without stress on the locking means 57-58, as will be understood. Release of all skis is instantly achieved by unlocking at 57 and merely raising arm 22.

The arrangement of FIG. 8 incorporates certain modifications with respect to that of FIGS. 1 to 7, but using the same channel-frame section and many of the general principles already described. However, from the point of view of the respective ganged connections of the respective pluralities of fixed post members and movable post members 21, there is an important difference. In FIG. 8, two like wide straps 60-61 provide the interconnections, being typified by the planform views of FIG. 9a and 9b. The first 60 of these straps is connected to all movable ski-post members 21; the second 61 is connected to the frame 10 and to all fixed ski-post members 20', as will be more apparent from FIGS. 11 and 12. As previously described, all skipost members may be duplicates, it being a feature of those (20-2l') of FIG. 8 that they each include an integral downward projection or lug 62 of rectangular section to accurately locate in one of the smaller rectangular openings 63 of the control straps 60-61; at the same time, a series of longer rectangular openings 64, interlaced with the smaller openings 63, accommodate insertion of lugs 62 while permitting a degree of longitudinal relative movement of the strap and lug involved.

The relation of straps 60-61 for the ski-locked condition of the rack is suggested by the overlap of the two showings, FIGS. 9a and 9b, the two like straps 60-61 being assembled in end-for-end reversed relation. Thus, the lug 62 for the first (left-most) fixed ski-post member 20 passes through the left-most small opening 63 in strap 61 and through the left-most larger opening 64 in strap 60, and lugs 62 for remaining fixed ski-post members 20' in the full assembly will be understood to similarly engage small openings 63 in strap 61 and larger openings 64 in strap 60. Similarly, the lug 62 for the first (left-most) movable ski-post member 21' passes through the left-most larger opening 64 in strap 61 and through the left-most small opening 63 in strap 60, and lugs 62 for remaining movable ski-post members 21 in the full assembly will be understood to similarly engage small openings in strap 60 and larger openings in strap 61. For the fixed strap 61, and offset end is pierced at 65 for local securing to frame member 10, and the same piercings 65' in strap 60 enable a moldedplastic glide fitting 66 (FIG. 8) to be riveted thereto, as suggested by rivet alignments 67-67.

Fitting 66 includes a wide rectangular base 68 which is guided within the upwardly open channel of frame 10, being retained between the vertical side walls thereof and between the web and upper flange portions 26 thereof. An upper projection 69, guided between adjacent edges of flanges 26, is slotted to accommodate pinned connection of the actuator link 46, the latter being also connected to actuator arm 22' to complete a toggle-actuator mechanism. Arm 22' is preferably an inverted channel with an internal wall-to-wall spacing which spans the width of frame 10, thus allowing the channel walls 44 to substantially overlap and enclose the top of frame 10, both at a pinned connection '43 to the frame 10 and throughout the end region beyond the first ski-post member 20. The cap or head end 45' of arm 22 may also comprise side-plate formations 70 which overlap the end of frame 10, when in ski-locking position.

In accordance with a further feature of the invention, provision is made for effectively closing off or sealing the upwardly-open frame channel, in the spaces between adjacent fixed and movable skipost members of adjacent ski-clamping pairs. Specifically, in FIGS. 8,

and 10 to 12, a single injection-molded elastomeric member 71 serves this purpose.

As best seen in FIG. 10, member 71 is an inverted channel comprising an upper base region 72 and two outwardly flaring sidewall regions 73. The longitudinal ends of the base region 72 are slitted at 74 to define forked ends for the independent integral accommodation of relatively large prismatic locating blocks 75, via short connecting tongues, as at 76. To retain a connection to member 71, the lower end of the arm 28 of each post structure is laterally slitted at 77 (best seen in FIG. 8). Assembly involves placement of a block 75 behind each arm 28 at one of the slits 77, the associated tongue 76 being located in the slit and flaring walls 73 being held downward, in seal-wiping contact with the respective flanges 26, when in the ski-clamping position (FIG. 11); in this position, the longitudinal dimensions are preferably so chosen that member 71 is longitudinally tensed and is slightly upwardly arched in the space between adjacent ski-post members 21-20. This being the case, actuation of arm 22 in the ski-unclamping direction brings adjacent members 2l-20 of adjacent ski-clamping pairs into closer proximity and forces seal member 71 to further arch, as best seen in FIG. 12. In this process, any ice formation over member 71 is quickly broken, dislodged, and ejected away from the open slot between flanges 26. Closure to the skiclamping condition re-tenses and seals member 71 to flanges 26, to resume the FIG. 11 relationship.

FIGS. 13 and 14 show a modified seal member 78 wherein a stiffly compliant reinforcement, such as an upwardly arched piece of spring steel 79 is imbedded in the elastomeric molding for member 78. The longitudinal ends of the reinforcement 79 are centrally notched at 80, for location by the central web 81 of each ski-post member at slots 77, and the dimensions are preferably so selected that for the ski-clamped condition of FIG. 11, the member 78 is under slight resilient compression, into a slight or low-profile upward arch, as suggested by the profile of member 71 in FIG. 11.

It will be appreciated that we have described an improved ski-rack construction meeting all stated objects. Specifically, the following desirable ends are achieved:

1. Skis are carried in an attitude (orientation) that is the same as when carried or stored by the skier; this enables easier loading and unloading of the skis in the racks of the carrier.

2. With tails pointing forward and held in the described attitude, wind and drag resistance are minimized in transit; this attitude also presents less area for snow or ice accumulation.

3. There is but a single point (57) for locking all the skis, as distinguished from most racks of equivalent capacity, which require four locking points. The invention thus specifically avoids the situation of somebody on the passenger side forgetting to lock his side of the rack.

4. The driver can with significant convenience unlock the whole rack from his side of the car.

5. The described clamp mechanism is equally applicable to carriers mounted upon the rear deck lid, as distinguished from roof mounting.

6. The mechanism is sealable against snow and ice accumulation, and is self-purging upon actuation.

While the invention has been described in detail for the preferred form shown, it will be understood that modifications may be made without departing from the invention. For example, to carry forward the icepurging function of our carrier, the base ends of all skipost members -21, 20'21' may be formed with an integral obliquely sloped plow surface 85, rising above the plane of strap connection, and having the effect of upwardly displacing snow and/or ice accumulations for discharge out the upper frame channel, i.e., between flanges 26.

What is claimed is:

1. A rack for skis or the like, comprising elongated frame means with means for mounting the same to a vehicle, a first plurality of like ski-post members carried by said frame means and fixedly spaced with respect to each other, a second plurality of like ski-post members fixedly spaced with respect to each other and carried by said frame means at locations interlaced with those of said first plurality, whereby a ski-post member of one plurality and an adjacent ski-post member of the other plurality define one of a plurality of spaced skiengageable pairs, one of said pluralities of ski-post members being movable with respect to the other of said pluralities in such manner that in a first position all corresponding pairs of ski-post members are in closed ski-engaging adjacency and that in a second position all corresponding pairs of ski-post members are spaced sufficiently for ski removal or insertion, movable actuator means carried by said frame means at a location offset from said ski-post members and reacting between said first and second pluralities for selectively moving the same from and to said first and second positions, and a flexible member connected to a ski-post member of one plurality and to the next adjacent ski-post member of the other plurality, said flexible member substantially covering the top of said frame means between said adjacent ski-post members when said pluralities are in the first or ski-clamped position, said flexible member presenting negligible resistance to actuator movement upon operation to the second position.

2. A rack according to claim 1, and including locking means for fixedly retaining said actuator means when said pluralities are in said first position.

3. A rack according to claim 1, in which said actuator means is located at a single end of said frame means.

4. A rack according to claim 1, in which said flexible member is of elastomeric material and is slightly upwardly arched when said pluralities are in said first position, whereby said flexible member is forced to substantially elevate its arch upon actuation to said second position.

5. A rack according to claim 1, in which said flexible member is of inverted channel shape, the free edges of the side walls of the channel engaging transversely spaced regions of the top of said frame means when in said first position.

6. A rack according to claim 5, in which said flexible member is longitudinally tensed in its connection to said adjacent ski-post members when in said first position and is longitudinally compressed into an elevated centrally arched condition when in said second position.

7. A rack according to claim 5, in which said flexible member includes an upwardly arched reinforcement of relatively stiffly compliant material.

8. A rack for skis or the like, comprising an elongated frame member including elongated guide channel, a first plurality of ski-post members carried by said frame member at fixedly spaced locations along said channel, a second plurality of ski-post members carried by said frame member at locations interlaced with the ski-post members of said first plurality and slidable along said channel, a ganged connection comprising an elongated member slidably contained within said channel and retaining ski-post members of said second plurality in longitudinally spaced relation for guided movement in unison, such movement being between (a) a first position in which adjacent pairs of fixed and movable post members are in ski-engaging adjacency and (b) a second position in which adjacent pairs of fixed and movable post members are spaced sufficiently for ski removal or insertion, and a single actuator carried by said frame member for displacing said second plurality with respect to said first plurality.

9. A rack according to claim 8, in which said gangedconnection member is a strap connected to all ski-post members of said second plurality.

10. A rack according to claim 9, in which a second elongated strap contained within said channel retains the ski-post spacing of said first plurality, said second strap being fixed to said frame.

11. A rack according to claim 8, in which said actuator comprises a toggle clamp reacting between said frame and said ganged-connection member.

12. A rack according to claim 11, in which the sense of toggle-clamp connection to said ganged-connection member is such as to tension said ganged-connection member in the clamped setting of said first position.

13. A rack according to claim 8, in which said actuator comprises a slide longitudinally guided within said channel, said slide being connected to said gangedconnection member, an arm pivoted to said frame on a first transverse axis, and a link having one end pivoted to said arm on a second axis and at a location offset from said first axis, the other end of said link being connected to said slide on a third axis, said axes being in substantially a single plane when said arm is pivoted to substantial alignment with said frame and when said pluralities are in said first position.

14. A rack according to claim 13, in which said arm is pivoted between the sidewalls of the channel, being received within the channel when said pluralities are in said first position.

15. A rack according to claim 13, in which said axes are substantially in the plane of said ganged-connection member when said pluralities are in said first position.

16. A rack according to claim 9, in which said frame member is arched for general conformance with an automobile roof, said channel being upwardly open and including a bottom formation positioning said strap for guided conformance to the arch.

17. A rack according to claim 13, in which keyoperated lock means including coacting members carried by said arm and by said frame selectively retains said arm when said pluralities are in said first position.

18. A rack according to claim 17, in which said arm includes an ene cap which is positioned, in the down position of said arm, to effectively close off the otherwise open end of said channel; said lock members of said arm being carried by said end cap.

19. A ski rack according to claim 8, in which said guide means includes a liner of low-friction plastic material.

20. A rack according to claim 8, in which said frame means includes a downwardly open channel, car-body anchor means referenced to said frame means within said last-mentioned channel and including adjustable means accessible via an open longitudinal end of said last-mentioned channel, said actuator including means pivoted to said frame near said longitudinal end and including a lockable end cap which in lockable position closes the said ene of both channels and which is movable, when unlocked, to a position which at least clears the end of the downwardly open channel.

21. A rack according to claim 8, in which said ganged connection comprises an elongated horizontal strap slidably contained within said channel, each ski-post member of said second plurality being connected to said strap on a central longitudinal alignment thereof.

22. A rack according to claim 21, in which a second strap overlapping said first strap connects the ski-post members of said second plurality, said second strap being fixed to said frame member, and each of said straps being slotted to permit ski-post member control via movement of said first strap with respect to said second strap.

23. A rack for skis or the like, comprising an elongated frame member including elongated guide means, a first plurality of ski-post members carried by said frame member at fixedly spaced locations along said guide means, a second plurality of ski-post members carried by said frame member at locations interlaced with the ski-post members of said first plurality and slidable along said guide means, a ganged connection retaining ski-post members of said second plurality in longitudinally spaced relation for guided movement in unison, such movement being between (a) a first position in which adjacent pairs of fixed and movable post members are in ski-engaging adjacency and (b) a second position in which adjacent pairs of fixed and movable post members are spaced sufficiently for ski removal or insertion, and a single actuator carried by said frame member and connected to one of the ski-post members of said second plurality for displacing in unison the ski-post members of said second plurality with respect to those of said first plurality.

24. A rack according to claim 23, in which adjacent sides of said pairs of post members carry cushion means for resilient ski contact.

25. A rack according to claim 23, in which said frame member includes a channel with said guide means at the mouth of the channel.

26. A rack for skis or the like, comprising elongated frame means with means for mounting the same to a vehicle, a first plurality of like ski-post members carried by said frame means and fixedly spaced with respect to each other, a second plurality of like ski-post members fixedly spaced with respect to each other and carried by said frame means at locations interlaced with those of said first plurality, whereby a ski-post member of one plurality and an adjacent ski-post member of the other plurality define one of a plurality of spaced skiengageable pairs, one of said pluralities of ski-post members being movable with respect to the other of said pluralities in such manner that in a first position all corresponding pairs of ski-post members are in closed ski-engaging adjacency and that in a second position all corresponding pairs of ski-post members are spaced sufficiently for ski removal or insertion, said frame means including an upwardly open channel in which said ski-post members are positioned and guided, overlapping flat control strap means interconnecting the ski-post members of the respective pluralities and determining said spaced relationships, each ski-post member having an obliquely inclined plow formation rising from the elevation of strap adjacency and sloped to upwardly force snow or ice accumulations upon operation of said actuator means, and movable actuator means carried by said frame means at a location offset from said ski-post members and reacting between said first and second pluralities for selectively moving the same from and to said first and second positions.

27. A rack for skis or the like, comprising elongated frame means with means for mounting the same to a vehicle, a first plurality of like ski-post members carried by said frame means and fixedly spaced with respect to each other, a second plurality of like ski-post members fixedly spaced with respect to each other and carried by said frame means at locations interlaced with those of said first plurality, whereby a ski-post member of one plurality and an adjacent ski-post member of the other plurality define one of a plurality of spaced skiengageable pairs, one of said pluralities of ski-post members being movable with respect to the other of said pluralities in such manner that in a first position all corresponding pairs of ski-post members are in closed ski-engaging adjacency and that in a second position all corresponding pairs of ski-post members are spaced sufficiently for ski removal or insertion, said frame means including an upwardly open channel in which said ski-post members are positioned and guided, and movable actuator means carried by said frame means at a location offset from said ski-post members and reacting between said first and second pluralities for selectively moving the same from and to said first and second positions, said actuator means including a single channel having an internal wall-to-wall span at least equal to the width of said upwardly open channel, said actuator channel being downwardly open and covering one end region of said upwardly open channel when said pluralities are in said first position.

28. A rack according to claim 27, in which said actuator channel is pivotally connected at one end to said upwardly open channel.

29. A rack according to claim 27, in which a separate flexible member of inverted-channel shape interconnects adjacent ski-post members of the respective pluralities and has edge-sealing contact with the side walls of the upwardly open channel, for the first-position relation of said ski-post members.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2480353 *Apr 24, 1947Aug 30, 1949Bjork Albin ACarrier applied to car tops
US2782973 *May 25, 1954Feb 26, 1957Lang Joseph BAutomobile top carrier for skis
US2946452 *Apr 16, 1958Jul 26, 1960Artistic Wood Specialties IncHorizontal gun rack with locking device
US3053561 *Dec 7, 1960Sep 11, 1962Richard HamelBottle handling device
US3086688 *Jan 20, 1959Apr 23, 1963Vikre Merle AHandle-equipped ski carrier
US3606111 *Apr 21, 1969Sep 20, 1971Gjesdahl Donald JTiltable frame ski rack for automobile trunk lids
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification224/315, 211/70.5, 294/87.1, 294/119.1, 224/323, 224/329, 224/917.5
International ClassificationB60R9/12, B60R9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB60R9/12
European ClassificationB60R9/12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 22, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BARRECA PRODUCTS CO.INC. AKA BARRECA PRODUCTS CO.
Effective date: 19810430
Owner name: SHELBURNE CORPORATION,THE, RT.7,SHELBURNE,VT. 0548
Oct 22, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SHELBURNE CORPORATION,THE, RT.7,SHELBURNE,VT. 0548
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BARRECA PRODUCTS CO.INC. AKA BARRECA PRODUCTS CO.;REEL/FRAME:003924/0230
Effective date: 19810430