Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3836142 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateSep 25, 1972
Priority dateSep 25, 1972
Publication numberUS 3836142 A, US 3836142A, US-A-3836142, US3836142 A, US3836142A
InventorsBaker G
Original AssigneeBaker G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fishing game
US 3836142 A
Abstract
A magnetic game of skill, for example, a magnetic fishing game, is provided. The game includes a game board, which, in one example, is laid out as a facsimile of a river. A plurality of well-like enclosures are provided which extend downwardly from the board from apertures which are provided in the board. For example, the apertures may be disposed in the facsimile of the river to simulate the deep pools in the river where salmon congregate. A plurality of game pieces are provided, which are formed of non-magnetic, non-magnetizable material, and are adapted to be disposed in the bottom of such well-like enclosures. For example, a plurality of "fish" may be provided, which are formed of a pair of copper wire ellipses disposed at right angles to one another, and united by means of a copper wire encircling ring. A magnet is disposed adjacent the mouth of each well-like enclosure to provide a predetermined field of magnetic flux at the mouth of the aperture leading to the well-like enclosure. For example, magnets of different strength and sizes are disposed at different locations around the perimeter of the apertures leading to the well-like enclosures. Finally, capture members are provided, formed of magnetizable material, which are adapted to grasp the game pieces, provided they pass through the magnetic flux at the mouth of the well-like enclosures. For example, the capture members may be a hook at the end of a line secured to a facsimile of a fishing rod, and formed of magnetizable material, and adapted to engage the loops of the copper wire "fish.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Baker Sept. 17, 1974 FISHING GAME [76] Inventor: Gordon W. Baker, Middleton,

Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada [22] Filed: Sept. 25, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 293,304

Primary ExaminerAnt0n O. Oechsle Assistant ExaminerPaul E. Shapiro Attorney, Agent, or FirmFred C. Philpitt [5 7] ABSTRACT A magnetic game of skill, for example, a magnetic fishing game, is provided. The game includes a game board, which, in one example, is laid out as a facsimile of a river. A plurality of well-like enclosures are provided which extend downwardly from the board from apertures which are provided in the board. For example, the apertures may be disposed in the facsimile of the river to simulate the deep pools in the river where salmon congregate. A plurality of game pieces are provided, which are formed of non-magnetic, non-magnetizable material, and are adapted to be disposed in the bottom of such well-like enclosures. For example, a plurality of fish" may be provided, which are formed of a pair of copper wire ellipses disposed at right angles to one another, and united by means of a copper wire encircling ring. A magnet is disposed adjacent the mouth of each well-like enclosure to provide a predetermined field of magnetic flux at the mouth of the aperture leading to the well-like enclosure. For example, magnets of different strength and sizes are disposed at different locations around the perimeter of the apertures leading to the well-like enclosures. Finally, capture members are provided, formed of magnetizable material, which are adapted to grasp the game pieces, provided they pass through the magnetic flux at the mouth of the well-like enclosures. For example, the capture members may be a hook at the end of a line secured to a facsimile of a fishing rod, and formed of magnetizable material, and adapted to engage the loops of the copper wire fish.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures FISHING GAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION A. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to a game, and more particularly to a magnetic game of skill. More specifically, it relates to a magnetic fishing game involving a high degree of skill.

B. Description of the Prior Art Many magnetic fishing games have been proposed, but most rely on luck rather than skill in their playing. In US. Pat. No. 2,557,789 issued June 19, 1951 to J. F. Lamka, the concept is provided of a hollow, floatable fish having a nose portion formed of soft iron or other metal which is easily attracted by a magnet. The fish are caught by a fish pole including a string to which is attached a permanent magnet. No obstacles are provided to make the catching of the fish more difficult.

In US. Pat. No. 2,747,872 issued May 29, 1956 to L. A. Harvey, an alleged improvement to provide a game requiring skill and care to keep the fish within the grasp of the magnet while drawing the fish through the fish pond is provided by means of a tortuous channel between various obstacles in the fish pond.

In US. Pat. No. 3,249,357 issued May 3, 1966 to C. R. Luchsinger, a further modification is provided by having both the fish and hazards formed of a magnetizable material. The arrangement of the game components is alleged to call for a manual dexterity requiring a high degree of skill and precision in order to catch the fish without being fouled by the hazards.

US. Pat. No. 3,545,750 issued Dec. 8, 1970 to J. J. Stachnik, Sr. provides a magnetic fishing game which combines the elements of chance and skill by having a housing with a receptacle rotatably mounted in the housing and in which the fish rests. An agitating member projects downwardly into the receptacle to shift the fish as the receptacle rotates. The hook to catch the fish is inserted into an opening in the housing. The location of the fish is therefore random.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A. Aims of the Invention Accordingly, it is an object of a principal aspect of this invention to provide a magnetic game of skill (e.g., a magnetic fishing game) in which simulating obstacles are provided inhibiting the capture of the game pieces (e.g., simulated wind and current factors inhibiting the catching of the fish).

B. Broad Statement of the Invention By a broad aspect of this invention a magnetic game of skill (e.g., magnetic fishing game) is provided, comprising: a game board (e.g., laid out as a facsimile of a river); a plurality of well-like enclosures depending downwardly from the board from apertures formed in the board (e.g., disposed in the facsimile of a river to simulate deep pools in the river); a plurality of game pieces formed of non-magnetic, non-magnetizable material and adapted to be disposed in the bottom of such well-like enclosures (e.g., a plurality of fanciful replicas of fish formed of a pair of copper wire ellipses disposed at right angles to one another, and joined together by encircling band or bands;) a magnet disposed adjacent each well-like enclosure to provide a predetermined field of magnetic flux at the mouth of the aperture leading to the well-like enclosure (e.g., magnets of different strengths and disposed at different locations around the perimeter of the apertures leading to the well-like enclosures) and capture members formed of magnetizable material but adapted to grasp the game pieces (e.g., a hook at the end ofa line secured to a facsimile of a fishing rod and formed of magnetizable material, and adapted to engage the loops of the copper wire fish).

VARIANTS OF THE INVENTION The present invention is more specifically directed to a magnetic fishing game which closely simulates salmon fishing. As any experienced salmon fisherman knows, this species is, by far, the most difficult to catch on fly, the legal lure on most streams in North America.

Salmon, hatched in rivers of North America go the sea and first return to their spawning ground, in the river of their birth, as grilse. After subsequent returns to the sea, where growth is rapid, they again seek out their birthplace and spawn on gravel bars, generally in the headwaters. It is the consensus that the older the fish the more difficult she is to catch. The time of migration upstream toward the spawning ground varies in different rivers. On the whole, they migrate in April, May and June.

In the course of proceeding up the river they pause in pools and invariably take up their position behind some obstruction which deflects the current and makes it easier for them to rest. The bigger fish seem to prefer certain pools and it appears that the older and bigger the fish, the more difficult she is to catch.

Unlike the trout, for example, the salmon is reluctant to take a fly unless it is presented in close proximity to her nose. The placing of the fly to suit the salmon requires considerable casting skill, not only to combat the breeze or wind, so prevalent on rivers, but also to gauge the current in order to have the fly swing around to an enticing position.

The magnetic fishing game of the present invention has for its main object the duplicating of the conditions facing the salmon angler on certain pools.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the game with the pictorial covering removed;

FIG. 2 is a section along the line IIII of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a section along the line III-Ill of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the fishing pole; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the fish.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the game comprises a bottom section 10 and a superposed top section 11 desirably secured together by hinges 13 along one edge l4, 15 of the bottom and top sections 10, 11 respectively and a hook 16 along an opposed edge 17, 18.of the bottom and top sections 10, 11 respectively.

The bottom section 10 comprises a pair of mutually opposed side walls 20, 21 (see FIG. 2), a pair of mutually opposed end walls 22, 23 (see FIG. 3) and a bottom 24. The upper section 1 1 comprises a pair of mutually opposed side walls 25, 26 (see FIG. 2), a pair of mutually opposed end walls 27, 28 (see FIG. 3), and a ceiling 29. Side walls 25, 26 extend upwardly from the ceiling 29 to provide auxiliary side walls 30, 31, and similarly end walls 27, 28 extend upwardly from the ceiling 29 to provide auxiliary end walls 32, 33. Walls 30, 31, 32, 33 are provided with rabbets 34, 35, 36, 37 to provide border walls 38, 39, 40, 41 respectively. The border walls provide a sunken effect. The base of rabbets 34, 35, 36, 37 provides a ledge 42, 43, 44, 45 to which the pictorial covering (shown in broken lines 46 in FIGS. 2 and 3) is secured. The bottom of walls 25, 26, 27, 28 rests on the top of walls 20, 21, 22, 23 respectively.

As seen in FIG. 1, the ceiling 29 is provided with a plurality (namely four) apertures 47, 48, 49, 50. Disposed in the apertures and extending upwardly therefrom to a height which is lower than the height of the border walls 38, 39, 40, 41 are collars 51, 52, 53, 54 respectively, formed of a non-magnetic or non-magnetizable material e.g., a suitable synthetic plastics material, e.g., polyethylene, polystyrene, vinyl, etc. The collars 51, 52, 53, 54 should preferably be bevelled in order to prevent being hooked. Disposed below each aperturecollar combination and secured to the bottom 24 is a flat, closed ended cup 55, 56, 57, 58. The cups each are of a diameter, at its open end adjacent ceiling 29, greater than the diameter of the collar. The interior of the closed end is in the form of a hemisphere 59, 60, 61, 62.

Disposed at predetermined, different locations around the collars 51, 52, 53, 54 are magnets 63, 64, 65, 66 of different sizes and magnetic strengths. Once the collars and magnets have been put in place and secured there, the pictorial covering 46 (e.g., the river scene) is stretched over the collars and magnets to be secured as hereinabove specified.

As seen in FIG. 4, the facsimile of the fishing rod is formed of a slightly tapered rod 67 formed of a suitable synthetic plastics material (e.g., as specified above), and having a round gripping butt 68. A fine, silk-like thread line 69 is secured to the tapered end, and, to the end of the line is a hook 70. The thread, in a preferred embodiment, should be about 12 inches in length, and the hook 70 may, in a preferred embodiment, be a No. double hook fly hook, dulled and with the feathers trimmed to A inch overall width.

As seen in FIG. 5, the fish 71 are formed of non-magnetizable (i.e., copper) wire, first shaped in the form of two ellipses 72, 73 which are placed at right angles to one another and joined together, as by soldering, by means of an encircling band 74.

OPERATION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT To play the game, the hook is dropped into a cup 55, 56, 57, 58 and a copper wire fish is retrieved. Difficulties are provided by the fact that the hook must pass through a zone of magnetic flux before it can possibly engage any fish." If skill and dexterity are not used, the hook will be attracted to and be held by the magnetic flux by means of the magnet, and could come into contact with the pictorial covering 46.

One manner of playing the game would be by the following rules. The players decide the total number of fly casts (drops) each player shall make. The total casts allotted the player may be made at one pool or distributed over any or all of the pools. The total weight of salmon caught decides the winner.

CONCLUSIONS From the foregoing description, one skilled in the art can easily ascertain the essential characteristics of this invention, and without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, can make various changes and modifications of the invention to adapt it to various usages and conditions. Consequently, such changes and modifications are properly, equitably and intended to be, within the full range of equivalence of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A magnetic game of skill, comprising: a game board laid out as a facsimile of a river; a plurality of well-like enclosures depending downwardly from said board from apertures provided therein; a plurality of game pieces each comprising a simulated fish formed of a pair of copper wire ellipses disposed at right angles to one another and united by means of an encircling copper wire ring, said pieces adapted to be disposed in the bottom of such well-like enclosures; a magnet disposed adjacent each well-like enclosure to provide a predetermined field of magnetic flux at the mouth of the aperture leading to the well-like enclosure; and a capture member adapted to grasp the game pieces provided the capture member passes successfully through the magnetic flux at the mouth of the well-like enclosures.

2. The game of claim 1, wherein the game board is in the form of a pair of rectangular, superposed boxes, hingedly secured to one another, in which the upper such box is provided with a base in which are provided the plurality of apertures, and in which each aperture is surrounded by a collar; and in which the lower such box is provided with a base on which are mounted the hollow well-like enclosures, the mouths thereof being aligned with respective such collars in said upper box.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US346892 *Aug 10, 1886 Maeie d
US484950 *Apr 6, 1892Oct 25, 1892 Game apparatus
US577730 *Jul 9, 1896Feb 23, 1897 eberhardt
US2598487 *Jun 23, 1949May 27, 1952Anechiarico Louis JFishing game
US2904336 *Mar 4, 1958Sep 15, 1959Fraser Washburn AlfredMagnetic game of skill
US3249357 *Mar 20, 1963May 3, 1966Luchland CompanyMagnetic game of skill
US3628792 *Feb 26, 1970Dec 21, 1971Mattel IncGame apparatus involving magnetized selection of game pieces
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4272075 *Oct 1, 1979Jun 9, 1981Rogers Jr Thurmond JFishing game
US4664389 *Oct 8, 1985May 12, 1987Barclay Precision Toys Inc.Toy car and method of utilzing same
US4746125 *Jun 5, 1987May 24, 1988Gordon Barlow DesignManipulative game
US5082274 *Jun 2, 1989Jan 21, 1992Bright Robert PGames and random selection apparatus therefor
US6789798May 12, 2003Sep 14, 2004Jonathan AdamsGame system and method of playing
US8757628Dec 8, 2011Jun 24, 2014Rick BakerBall capture game assembly
US20120058456 *Mar 9, 2011Mar 8, 2012Drinkard David ACasting Training Aid Including A Target Board That Depicts An Aquatic Scene
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/448
International ClassificationA63F9/00, A63F9/30, A63F9/34
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/34
European ClassificationA63F9/34