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Publication numberUS3836986 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1974
Filing dateFeb 9, 1973
Priority dateFeb 10, 1972
Publication numberUS 3836986 A, US 3836986A, US-A-3836986, US3836986 A, US3836986A
InventorsKawazoe M
Original AssigneeKawazoe M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tripod for camera
US 3836986 A
Abstract
A camera support comprises a spindle within which are telescopically fitted sleeves which can be extended so that the spindle can be extended vertically from a relatively small length to a larger length at the top of which a camera can be attached. The spindle is provided with three pivoting legs each having telescoping sections so that the legs can be extended. The legs can be pivoted from the spindle outwardly toward the bottom to form a tripod. The legs are in the shape of partial sectors of a circle so that when the legs with their telescoped sections retracted, are pivoted inward to the spindle they form a cylindrical surface around the spindle, in which form the camera support is a unipod.
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United States Patent 3,836,986

Kawazoe Sept. '17, 1974 TRIPOD FOR CAMERA Primary Examiner-John M. Horan Inventor: i i Kawame Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Donald Mon; Gordon l-ligashi-Oizumi, Nerima-ku, Tokyo, Angus 2 Japan [22] Filed: Feb. 9, 1973 [57] ABSTRACT Appl. No.: 331,255

A camera support comprises a spindle within which are telescopically fitted sleeves which can be extended so that the spindle can be extended vertically from a relatively small length to a larger length at the top of which a camera can be attached. The spindle is provided with three pivoting legs each having telescoping sections so that the legs can be extended. The legs can be pivoted from the spindle outwardly toward the bottom to form a tripod. The legs are in the shape of partial sectors of a circle so that when the legs with their telescoped sections retracted, are pivoted inward to the spindle they form a cylindrical surface around the spindle, in which form the camera support is a unipod.

1 Claim, 3 Drawing Figures This invention relates to a tripod for a camera, or a unipod which also serves as a tripod, for photographing high speed objects.

A tripod, has heretofore had three legs, the cross section of the said legs being circular or triangular making it difficult to put into a folded state. Furthermore it has a poor appearance.

An object of the present invention is to eliminate the said drawbacks by improving the form of cross section of the legs.

According to the present invention, the cross section of each leg is in the form of sector of a circle, each sector occupying one-third of the circle at least at the outer part of the circle. The outer faces of the said three legs thus form a cylindrical shape in the folded state.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be evident to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description and accompanying drawing, of which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of this invention in its folded state.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the said embodiment in its spread state.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of one of the legs of the said embodiment when in the folded condition;

Referring to the drawing, 1 is a cylindrical spindle in which plurality of sleeves -2, 3, are inserted slidably. A ball head 4 is provided at the upper end of the said spindle. In the case of a tripod which also serves as a unipod, abutment 5 which may be a circular rubber or metal member, is provided at the bottom end of the said spindle.

Bearing 6 is provided at the upper part of the said spindle 1. Outer leg 7, 7, 7, are pivoted on the said bearing 6 at the upper end thereof. The cross sction of each leg 7 is in the form of a sector; and the angle of the apex of the sector is 120 degree, hence the sector occupies one-third of that part of the circle which is outside the spindle. With-in outer leg 7, a second leg section 7a, and a third leg section 7b are inserted to slide telescopically to extend or shorten the leg. 8 is a ring sliding onthe outer surface of the said spindle, and 9, 9, 9 are rods connecting the said legs 7, 7, 7 to the said ring 9.

In operation, legs 7,7,7, are spreaded or rotated outwardly, and are extended downwardly, by its second section and third section 7b and spindle l is extended upwardly by its sleeves 2, 3 as shown in FIG. 2.

In the folded state, the outer faces of the said three legs 7,7,7, form a cylindrical shape as shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, so that the user is able to hold or adjust it easily, and the appearance in the folded state is attractive.

We claim:

1. In a camera support having a vertical axis and adapted for use as a tripod or a unipod, an assembly comprising: a bearing member on said vertical axis, three legs pivoted to said bearing member so that the legs can be brought vertically downward from said bearing member or pivoted to extend from the bearing member outwardly from said axis in the downward direction, each of said legs comprising a plurality of leg sections telescoped one within another, each leg section which lies within another being slidable within said other to increase the length of the respective leg, the outerward leg section of each leg having an outer surface in the form of a partial cylinder and having an end member extending inwardly from each of its vertical edges toward the vertical axis when the legs are brought vertically downward, so that the cross-section of each of said outermost leg sections has the form of a partial sector of a circle, the apex angle of which is one hundred twenty degrees, and the adjacent end members of adjacent partial sectors lie alongside each other, a hollow vertical spindle co-axial with said vertical axis, sleeve means telescoped within, and extending upwardly from, said spindle to increase the effective vertical height of the spindle, and a dish rim attached around the lower part of the spindle into which the lower ends of the legs are inserted when the legs are in their vertical position.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2599269 *Aug 17, 1949Jun 3, 1952Edward D MarklePhotographic stand
US2794612 *Mar 29, 1954Jun 4, 1957Ernest Clifton LeymanPortable camera stand
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5421549 *Dec 30, 1993Jun 6, 1995Richards; John W.Support stand for optical equipment
US5742859 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 21, 1998Acker; HeinzCamera support and stabilizing device
US6007259 *Apr 24, 1992Dec 28, 1999Sony CorporationTripods for supporting a video camera
US6375135 *Jan 15, 1999Apr 23, 2002Ultimate Support Systems, Inc.High strength engineered collapsible tripod
US7207118Nov 2, 2004Apr 24, 2007Black & Decker Inc.Multi-purpose strap for a laser tripod
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/163.1, 396/419
International ClassificationF16M11/02, F16M11/28, G03B17/56, F16M11/16, F16M11/32, F16M11/20
Cooperative ClassificationF16M11/32, F16M11/16
European ClassificationF16M11/32, F16M11/16