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Publication numberUS3837022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1974
Filing dateMar 30, 1973
Priority dateMar 30, 1973
Publication numberUS 3837022 A, US 3837022A, US-A-3837022, US3837022 A, US3837022A
InventorsP Moore
Original AssigneePhillips Petroleum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fibers for pillow stuffing
US 3837022 A
Abstract
Synthetic staple fibers having improved resilience, softness and non-scroopiness and which are suitable for use as bed pillow stuffing, are produced by melt spinning filaments from a blend of fiber-forming polymer of propylene and at least one wax compound having the formula WHEREIN X AND Z ARE INTEGERS IN THE RANGE OF 10 TO 25 AND Y IS AN INTEGER IN THE RANGE OF 2 TO 10, DRAWING, HEATING AND CRIMPING THE RESULTING FILAMENTS AND CUTTING THE CRIMPED FILAMENTS INTO STAPLE FIBERS, THE FILAMENTS BEING COATED WITH AN ETHOXYLATED POLYSILOXANE.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 [111 3,837,022 Moore 5] Sept. 24, 1974 FIBERS FOR PILLOW STUFFING [75] Inventor: Paul W. Moore, Greenville, S.C. Pr'mary Examme r Edward wh'tby [73] Assignee: Phillips Petroleum Company, [57] ABSTRACT Bartlesvllle Okla Synthetic staple fibers having improved resilience, [22] Fil d; M 30, 1973 softness and non-scroopiness and which are suitable for use as bed pillow stuffing, are produced by melt [21] Appl' 346334 spinning filaments from a blend of fiber-forming polymer of propylene and at least one wax compound hav- [52] US. Cl 5/355, 5/361 R, 28/75 WT, n; h formula v 117/4, 117/66, 117/161, 117/138.8 E,

117/168, 260/285 A, 260/37 S O 0 [51] Int. Cl. A47c 27/22 0 0 l C H l C [58] Field of Search 5/337, 355, 361 R; V 73 f i m 75? 28/75 WT; 260/285 A, 37 SI; 117/4, 138.8

E, 163, 66, 161 wherein x and z are integers in the range of 10 to 25 and y is an integer in the range of 2 to 10, drawing, [56] References Cit d heating and crimping the resulting filaments and cut- UNITED STATES PATENTS ting the crimped filaments into staple fibers, the fila- 3,3o3,150 2/1967 Coenen et a1 260/285 A mems bemg coated wlth an ethoxylated Polyslloxane' 3,423,235 1/1969 Campbell 117/168 X 12 Claims, N0 Drawings A FIBERS FOR PILLOW STUFFING In recent years the material utilized for pillow stuffing has changed from predominantly natural materials to predominantly synthetic fibers. The synthetic fibers have the advantages of being more uniform, substantially free of odor, substantially nonallergenic, and readily washable. However, difficulty has been encountered in the utilization of these synthetic fibers for pillow stuffing due to the low resilience of the fibers after a long period of use, the relative harsh hand of the fibers, and the noise generated by the movement of fibers against fibers or against the pillow casing.

Accordingly it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved synthetic fiber suitable for utilization as pillow stuffing. Another object of the invention is to provide a synthetic fiber having improved resilience, softness and non-scroopiness. Yet another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved pillow. Other objects, aspects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from a study of the disclosure and the appended claims to the invention.

In accordance with the present invention it has been discovered that synthetic staple fibers having improved resilience, softness and nomscroopiness, suitable for use for a bed pillow stuffing, can be prepared by melt spinning filaments from a blend of fiber-forming polymer of propylene and at least one wax compound having the formula wherein x and z are integers in the range of to and y is an integer in the range of 2 to 10, drawing the thus spun filaments, heating the thus drawn filaments to cause a portion of the wax compound to migrate to the surface of the filaments, crimping the thus heated filaments, and cutting the thus crimped filaments into staple fibers, and at some stage in this processing, coating the filaments with a finish composition comprising an ethoxylated polysiloxane.

The polypropylenes suitable for use in the present invention are the crystalline homopolymers of propylene and the crystalline copolymers of propylene and at least one other monoolefin having up to 8 carbon atoms. Generally the other monoolefins are used in the production of the copolymers in an amount lesss than about 10 mol percent, preferably in the range of about 0.1 to about 5 mol percent, and more preferably in the range of about 0.1 to about 3 mol percent. Specific examples include fiber-forming homopolymers of propylene, the fiber-forming copolymers of propylene and ethylene, the fiber-forming copolymers of propylene and butene-l, the fiber-forming copolymers of propylene and hexene-l, the fiber-forming copolymers of propylene and octene-l, and admixtures thereof.

The wax compounds which can be employed in the present invention include the N,N'- alkylenebis(alkanamides) having the structural formula wherein x and z are integers in the range of 10 to 25, preferably in the range of 15 to 20, and y is an integer in the range of 2 to 10, preferably in the range of 2 to 6. Exemplary compounds include N,N ethylenebis(undecanamide), N,N- propylenebis(undecanamide), N,N'-tetramethylenebis(hexacosanamide), N,N'-tetramethylenebis- (undecanamide), N,N-pentamethylenebis(hexadecanamide), N,N-hexamethylenebis(heneicosanamide), N,N-octamethylenebis(undecanamide), N,N'-

decamethylenebis( hexacosanamide N,N ethylenebis( hexadecanamide N,N ethylenebis( heptadecanamide N,N ethylenebis( octadecanamide N,N ethylenebis( nonadecanamide N,N ethylenebis( eicosanamide N,N ethylenebis( heneicosanamide N,N

ethylenebis( hexacosanamide), N,N'-trimethylenebis(- hexadecanamide N,N"- propylenebis( nonadecanamide N,N trimethylenebis( Z-methyleicosanamide N,N propylenebis( hexacosanamide N,N -tetramethylenebis(hexadecanamide), N,N-tetramethylenebis- (octadecanamide), N,N'-tetramethylenebis(- heneicosanamide), N,N'-pentamethylenebis(- nonadecanamide N ,N '-pentamethylenebis( heneicosanamide), N,N-hexamethylenebis(undecanamide N,N 3-methylpentamethylene )bis( hexadecanamide), N,N'-hexamethylenebis(nonadecanamide), N,N'-hexamethylenebis(hexacosanamide), N,- N-octamethylenebis(nonadecanamide, N,N-octamethylenebis(hexacosanamide), N,N-decamethylenebis- (undecanamide), N,N'-decamethylenebis(heptadecanamide N-[ 3-( 4- ethylpentadecanamido)butyl]-2- methyloctadecanamide, and admixtures thereof.

The wax compound can be added to the propylene polymer in any suitable manner known to the art. For example, the addition of the wax compound can be accomplished by dry blending, followed by melting and extrusion of the admixture. The wax compound can also be added to a hot melt of the polymer of propylene. The wax compound can be employed in any desired amount, but will generally be utilized in an amount in the range of about 0.1 to about 3 weight percent of the filament, and preferably will be in the range of about 0.5 to about 2 weight percent of the filament.

In addition to the wax compound, other compatible additives can be included in the propylene polymer composition. For example, various oxidation stabilizers, ultraviolet stabilizers, fillers, pigments, and dyes can be included in the formulation to be melt spun.

The ethoxylated polysiloxanes which can be utilized in the present invention include those having the structural formula wherein each R is individually selected frorn group A consisting of alkyls having from l to 6 carbon atoms, each X is individually selected from the group consisting of R and (-CH CH O)- H with from 10 to percent of the Xs being R, b being an integer having a value of at least 10 and c is an integer having a value of at least 20. In a presently preferred embodiment, each R is methyl, b is in the range of 10 to 22, c is in the range of 20 to 40, and the percent of the Xs being 4 coating comprising an ethoxylated polysiloxane. Although a different processing finish can be applied to the filaments before drawing and then subsequently removed by scouring before the ethoxylated polysiloxane methyl is in the range of about 60 percent to about 80 5 finish is added, it is presently preferred that the ethoxpercent. The silicon content of the ethoxylated polysiylated polysiloxane be applied to the filaments after soloxane will generally be in the range of about to lidification and before drawing. The ethoxylated polysiabout 60 weight percent, and preferably will be about loxane will generally be employed in an aqueous dis- 20 weight percent of the total polymer. The ethoxylpersion, and will be applied to the filaments to provide ated polysiloxane is water dispersible and has a viscos- 10 from about 0.02 to about 1 weight percent, preferably ity in the range of about 100 to about 400, preferably in the range of about 0.05 to about 0.5 weight percent, in the range of about 150 to about 250, centistokes at of the ethoxylated polysiloxane, based on the weight of 77F. the filaments. If desired, the finished coating can also The blend of fiber-forming polymer of propylene and contain other known components, for example wetting the wax compound can be melt spun into filaments by agents, corrosion inhibitors, and/or antistatic agents. A any known technique. After solidification the spun filasuitable wetting agent is a polyethoxylated straight ments are drawn to the desired extent, generally within chain alcohol, while a suitable corrosion inhibitor is sothe range of about 1.2 to about 7, preferably in the (hum nitrite, with bol'ax added as a buffering f A range of about 1.4 to about 5, times the original length. Suitable antistatic agent is a quaternary ammonium Salt- The drawn fibers are heated under suitable conditions The finish coating a be pp o the p filament to cause a portion f h wax compound to migrate to in any suitable manner known in the art in one or more the surface of the drawn filaments. The heat treated fil- Coating Operationsaments are crimped any manner known in the art The following example iS presented in further illusfor example stuffer box crimping gear cri nping jet tration of the invention and should not be construed in crimping, thermally induced self-crimping, and the undue limitation thereoflike. The heat treatment can be carried out prior to and/or simultaneously with the crimping operation. EXAMPLE The heating can be accomplished by any suitable means known in the for example radiant heat, ihli- Several runs were made for the production of fibers mate contact with hot air, saturated or superheated from polypropylene having a melt flow of about 12 and steam, and the like. In a presently preferred embodicontaining 1 weight percent N,N'- ment, the heating operation and crimping operation are ethylenebis( stearamide). A control run was conducted accomplished simultaneously by the intro uction of a without the additive. The undrawn fibers had a denier heated fluid, preferably superheated steam, in a stuffer per filament of about 10. In each run filaments were box crimping chamber. In the heat treatment operation combined to form a tow of about 50,000 denier. After the filaments are heated to a temperature in the range drawing, the filaments had a denier per filament of of about 220F to about 350F, preferably in the range about 6. The tow was crimped in a stuffer box forming o bo 230F to about 26001:, for a period Of time in a crimped tow having about 6 to 8 crimps per inch. The the range of about 1 to about 20 seconds, preferably in crimped tow was cut into staple 4 inches long and made the range of about 2 to about 10 seconds. 40 into bed pillows. Additional details of the treatment The crimped and heat treated filaments are then cut each sample received is listed in Table l below, along into staple fibers of the desired length in accordance with the characteristics of the resulting product.

TABLE 1 Heat Treatment Sam- Amount Steam in Stuffer Box Crimper External ple Wax, Wt. Tow Temp. About 230F, 5 Sec. Finish Resilience Softness" Scroopiness" 1 None None None No No Very noisy 2 l Yes A No Yes Slightly noisy 3 1 None A No No Very slightly noisy 4 1 Yes B Yes Yes No significant noise 5 None None B No Yes Very noisy 6 1 None B No Yes Very slightly noisy 7 None Yes B Yes Yes Very noisy "N,N-ethylenebis(stearamide) in Run l the external finish was scoured from the filaments before testing. in Runs 2-7 the external finish was applied as an aqueous dispersion in an amount sufficient to provide approximately 0.5 weight percent of the finish solids based on the weight of the filaments. External finish A is an ethoxylated tallow amine quaternized with diethyl sulfate. External finish B is an ethoxylated polysiloxane wherein R is methyl. and having a silicon content of about weight percent and a viscosity of about 200 centistokes at 77F.

Resiliency was determined by placing the test pillow on a horizontal surface and dropping a l6-Ib. bowling ball on the top of the pillow for i600 times from a point at the original height of the pillow. The initial pillow height and final pillow height are measured. A ratio of final pillow height to initial pillow height of at least 0.65 is considered satisfactory while a ratio less than this amount is considered unsatisfactory.

Softness was determined by manually feeling the fibers.

Scroopiness was determined by a technician laying his head on the pillow and moving his head in natural motions while listening for the noise level generated.

with any technique known in the art. In general the staple fibers will have a length in the range of about 1 to about 6, preferably in the range of about 2 to about 5 inches.

At at least one stage during this processing of the filaments, each individual filament is coated with a finish Reasonable variations and modifications are possible within the scope of the foregoing disclosure and the appended claims to the invention.

That which is claimed is: l. A method for producing synthetic staple fibers having improved resilience, softness, and nonscroopiness, suitable for use as bed pillow stuffing, which comprises melt spinning filaments from a blend of fiber-forming polymer of propylene and at least one wax compound having the formula wherein x and z are integers in the range of to 25 and y is an integer in the range of 2 to 10; drawing the thus spun filaments; heating the thus drawn filaments to cause a portion of said wax compound to migrate to the surface of the filaments; crimping the thus heated filaments; cutting the thus crimped filaments into staple fibers; and coating the filamentsat at least one stage in the processing thereof with a finish coating comprising an ethoxylated polysiloxane having the formula wherein each R is individually selected from the group consisting of alkyls having from 1 to 6 carbon atoms, each X is individually selected from the group consisting of R and +CH CH O+ H with from 10 to 90 percent of the Xs being R, b is an integer having a value of at least 10, and c is an integer having a value of at least 20.

2. A method in accordance with claim 1 wherein said wax compound is present in said blend in an amount to provide from about 0.1 to about 3 weight percent of the filaments, wherein said ethoxylated polysiloxane is present on said filaments in an amount in the range of about 0.02 to about 1 weight percent of the filament.

3. A method in accordance with claim 2 wherein said ethoxylated polysiloxane is applied to the filaments after solidification and before drawing.

4. A method in accordance with claim 3 wherein the step of heating the filaments to cause a portion of the wax component to migrate to the surface of the filaments is accomplished during the crimping of the filaments.

5. A method in accordance with claim 4 wherein the step of heating the filaments comprises heating the filaments to a temperature in the range of about 220F to about 350F for a period of time in the range of about 1 to about 20 seconds.

6. A method in accordance with claim 5 wherein each R is methyl.

7. A method in accordance with claim 6 wherein said ethoxylated polysiloxane has a viscosity in the range of about to about 250 centistokes at 77F.

8. A method in accordance with claim 7 wherein said wax compound is present in said blend in an amount to provide from about 0.5 to about 2 weight percent of the filaments, wherein said ethoxylated polysiloxane is present on said filaments in an amount in the range of about 0.05 to about 0.5 weight percent of the filament.

9. A method in accordance with claim 8 wherein said wax compound is N,N'-ethylenebis(stearamide).

10. A method in accordance with claim 1 wherein said wax compound is N,N-ethylenebis(stearamide), and wherein each R is methyl.

11. A pillow comprising a casing stuffed with staple fibers prepared by the method of claim 1.

12. A synthetic staple fiber having improved resilience, softness, and non-scroopiness, suitable for use as bed pillow stuffing, prepared by the method of claim 1.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3303150 *Apr 17, 1962Feb 7, 1967Shell Oil CoWax polymer compositions comprising petroleum wax, polyethylene and a copolymer of ethylene and at least one c3-c8 olefin
US3423235 *Nov 23, 1964Jan 21, 1969Dow CorningOrganosiloxane-containing finishes for organic fibers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3992341 *Apr 30, 1975Nov 16, 1976Basf AktiengesellschaftPolypropylene
US4320166 *May 2, 1980Mar 16, 1982Toray Industries, Inc.Thermal-insulating nonwoven bulky product
US4392903 *Sep 25, 1981Jul 12, 1983Toray Industries, Inc.Process for making a thermal-insulating nonwoven bulky product
US4395509 *Mar 2, 1982Jul 26, 1983Phillips Petroleum CompanyPoly(arylene sulfide) composition suitable for molding
US5837370 *Jun 12, 1997Nov 17, 1998E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyFabrics of wool and/or polyester fibers
EP1772542A1 *Sep 19, 2006Apr 11, 2007Cognis IP Management GmbHTextile fibers having soft hand characteristics and methods of making thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/369, 19/.46, 28/221, 28/265, 19/.56, 5/952
International ClassificationD01F1/10, B68G1/00, D06M15/647
Cooperative ClassificationD01F6/30, Y10S5/952, D01F6/06, D01F1/10, B68G1/00, D06M15/647
European ClassificationD01F1/10, D01F6/30, D01F6/06, D06M15/647, B68G1/00