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Publication numberUS3837101 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1974
Filing dateJul 18, 1973
Priority dateJul 18, 1973
Publication numberUS 3837101 A, US 3837101A, US-A-3837101, US3837101 A, US3837101A
InventorsYoung I
Original AssigneeYoung I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baggage tags
US 3837101 A
Abstract
A baggage tag of elongated form designed to be wrapped around the handle of a baggage item to lock in looped form. The tag is formed with a detachable coupon at one end and a tip portion at the other. The tag body has an opening presenting a tongue underneath which the tip - rolled back - is insertible. The tip portion has formations interlocking with side tabs in the opening on the partial retraction of the tip portion, and a stop opposite the tongue to check the re-advance of the tip portion.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Young l BAGGAGE TAGS [76] Inventor: Irvin L. Young, Rt. 1, Palmyra, Wis.

[22] Filed: July 18, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 380,491

[52] 11.8. Cl 40/21, 24/17, 292/307 [51] Int. Cl. G091 3/14 [58] Field of Search 40/302, 304, 21 R, 21 C,

40/20, 2, 10 C; 292/307 R, 207 R, 322; 24/17 AD, 16 PB, 30.5, 206 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 674,526 5/1901 Tyden 40/21 R 1,337,722 4/1920 Porter..

1,984,589 12/1934 Ludy .::..40/21R 1 Sept. 24, 1974 2,101,586 12/1937 Leach ..40/304 Primary ExaminerRobert W. Michell Assistant Examiner-Wenceslao J. Contreras [5 7 ABSTRACT A baggage tag of elongated form designed to be wrapped around the handle of a baggage item to lock in looped form. The tag is formed with a detachable coupon at one end and a tip portion at the other. The tag body has an opening presenting a tongue underneath which the tip rolled back is insertihle. The tip portion has formations interlocking with side tabs in the opening on the partial retraction of the tip portion, and a stop opposite the tongue to check the readvance of the tip portion.

2 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures BAGGAGE TAGS This invention relates to tags which are attached to the handles of valises, suit cases and the like for the identification of such baggage in store rooms, baggage compartments or during transit. More particularly, this type of tag is wrapped around the handle of the bag gage item and secured together, leaving an extending coupon which is torn away and kept by the owner of the baggage item. The coupon has a number identical with one on the remaining part of the tag, and the coupon is compared with the tag number when the baggage item is called for.

Various methods have been used for securing or locking the tag together after it has been looped around the handle of the baggage item, some being undependable because the tag would open on impact by other objects and become mislaid among other baggage or lost. This, of course, leads to uncertainty or delay in identifying desired articles of baggage, creating confusion and annoyance. It is therefore the main object of the present invention to provide a tag of the character described which secures a positive interlocking engagement when it is wrapped as a loop around the handle of the baggage item, so that no vibration or ordinary impact by other baggage or articles will open the tag and cause its separation from the baggage item to become mislaid or lost.

A further object is to provide a tag of the above character which is a one-piece, die-cut strip of flexible cardboard, printed on the body and coupon portions with the same identifying numbers.

Another object is to cut the novel tag with peculiar formations facilitating the easy insertion of a tip portion of the tag through the body portion thereof, and procure the locking connection by a short withdrawing movement to form a closed loop around the handle of the baggage item.

A better understanding of the invention may be gained by reference to the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the tag before its use;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the tag with the tip portion in sunken form to receive the handle ofa valise or other baggage item to which the tag is to be applied;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the tag with the tip portion directed toward the body portion;

FIG. 4 is a similar view with the tip portion inserted through an opening in the body portion, finely-dotted lines indicating a further advance of the tip portion;

FIG. 5 is an edge view of FIG. 4, with the tip portion in the inserted position; and

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 4 wherein a second locking facility for the tag portions is illustrated.

Referring specifically to the drawing, 10 denotes the body of the tag. The latter is a die-cut stamping of flexible cardboard; and the body is long and tapered. It has a wider portion 11 at one end, scored at 12 to separate it from a terminal coupon 13. The latter and the portion 11 are printed with like identifying numbers as shown.

The tip portion of the tag is indicated at 15, and tapers in rounded form. It originates with inward turns 16 which form side recesses 17; and these continue with side hooks 18 projecting from the outline of the tip portion. A circular aperture 19 is made in the latter midway between the side recesses 17.

The body ofthe tag is made with a wide central opening 20. This opening is flared to create angular side recesses 20a; and these continue toward the portion 11 with convex side tabs 2017 which lead into end recesses 20c of part-circular form. These pockets combine to form a central tongue 22 directed toward the opening 20 and terminating with a rounded tip 22a.

In the application of the tag, the object is to wrap it around the handle 25 of a valise, suit case or other baggage item and form a loop which is locked in closed position. The coupon 13 is then torn away, leaving the looped tag attached to the baggage item. The coupon is kept by the owner while the baggage item is left in the custody of a storage or transportation facility.

The tag is applied to the handle 25 by rolling the body 10 with a dip or pocket to receive the arched portion of the handle 25, as shown in FIG. 2. The tip portion 15 is now depressed to point toward the portion 11 of the tag as indicated in FIG. 3. At this time it is possible to advance the tip portion 15 over the opening 20 to slide under the tongue 22 to a point indicated by long dotted lines in FIG. 4 and full lines in FIG. 5. This is possible because the rounded end-notches 20c are spaced to admit the passage of the side hooks 18 of the tip portion 15, so that the latter may be advanced even further to the position indicated by finely-dotted lines in the same figure. The next movement is to retract the tip portion with slight downpressure. This deflects and catches the hooks 18 under the side tabs 20b to the positions indicated in FIG. 6 where they seat in the angular side recesses 20; and these form stops against the further retraction of the tip portion. Since drawing or jarring forces of the baggage usually pull on the tag, they are counteracted by the locking engagement just described.

In the first part of the tip portion advance to enter underneath the tongue 22 as indicated in FIG. 5 the tongue becomes flexed in upward direction. Therefore, when the tip portion is retracted to lock the tag as described above, the tongue returns to its normal plane by dipping into the aperture 19 as seen in FIG. 6, and because of the tendency of the tip portion 15 to rise from the body of the tag. Now the tongue becomes a check against the re-advance of the tip portion 15 such as from outside impact to loosen it from the engagement of its hooks 18 with the side pockets 20 previously explained. The tip portion is thus locked from dislocation in both the retracting and re-advancing directions.

When the looped tag has been locked to the baggage handle as described, its coupon 13 is torn away and the baggage item left in the proper custody for storage or transit. To redeem the baggage item, the approach is toward the projecting end of the tag, which carries the same identification number as the coupon. The numbers on such projecting end and the coupon are therefore readable from the approaching direction.

It is now apparent that the novel tag has formations which facilitate its locking engagement against pullingapart or internal-disconnecting influences. Also, since the opening 20 is wide See FIG. 3 no special care need be exercised to insert the tip portion 15 into it, other than to press the tip portion under the tongue 22. Beyond this the further advance of the tip and its retraction to a stop are the only movements required to lock the tag in the looped state. The tag is then secure against all ordinary influences to re-open it. Finally, the tag is made as a one-piece stamping, and requires no additions or extra parts to provide the connecting and locking features described.

I claim:

I. A baggage identification tag having a detachable identification coupon on one end and comprising an elongated and tapered member formed from a flexible material and having a body portion and a tip portion, said tip portion being opposite said one end, said body portion containing an opening to receive said tip portion, each lateral side of said opening having a concaveconvex form diverging from a common juncture toward said one end to form a first interlock with a concaveconvex form on each side of said tip portion when said portion is inserted into said opening and a tapered member extending into said opening between said lateral sides towards said tip portion to form a second interlock with an aperture on said tip portion upon insertion of said portion into said opening to restrain said concave-convex forms on said opening from disengagement with said concave-convex forms on said tip portion.

2. A baggage identification tag having a detachable identification coupon on one end and comprising an elongated and tapered member formed from a flexible material and having a body portion and a tip portion, said tip portion being opposite said one end, said body portion containing an opening to receive said tip portion, said opeining having a first means to securely engage a first interlocking means on said tip portion and a second means to engage a second interlocking means on said tip portion to restrain said first interlocking means from disengagement with said first engaging means, said first engaging means comprising a pair of opposed, spaced apart angular side recesses in the side edges of said opening and a convex side tab adjacent each recess extending into said opening, said first interlocking means comprising a pair of opposed side hooks projecting outwardly from said tip portion and a recess in said tip portion adjacent each side hook in the direction of the opening, whereby when said tip portion is inserted into said opening, said convex side tabs over lay said tip portion side hooks and said tip portion recesses engage said angular side recesses to lock said tip portion against retraction from said opening, said second engaging means comprising a tongue extending into said opening in the direction of said tip portion and terminating in a rounded end, and said second interlocking means comprising an aperture in said tip portion between said first interlocking means, said aperture being of a size to receive said rounded end of said tongue when said tip portion is retracted into said first interlocking engagement, thereby locking said tip portion against being released from said first interlocking engagement.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US674526 *Feb 12, 1900May 21, 1901Emil TydenCombined baggage check and seal.
US1337722 *Jan 22, 1917Apr 20, 1920Robert L PorterBaggage-check
US1984589 *Dec 2, 1931Dec 18, 1934Ludy George BTag
US2101586 *Mar 25, 1937Dec 7, 1937Harry LeachSeal
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4142310 *Apr 11, 1977Mar 6, 1979Groselak Robert ESelf-locking baggage tag
US4209924 *Jul 26, 1978Jul 1, 1980Fearing Manufacturing Co., Inc.Marking tag
US4439899 *Nov 12, 1981Apr 3, 1984Rudolph ReuBoiuClamping apparatus
US4477950 *Nov 29, 1982Oct 23, 1984Union Carbide CorporationClosure
US4630384 *Jan 31, 1985Dec 23, 1986Rand Mcnally & Co.Self-locking baggage tag
US4750284 *Jun 16, 1986Jun 14, 1988Sterimatic Holdings LimitedTag assemblies
US5197164 *Jun 1, 1992Mar 30, 1993Illinois Tool Works Inc.Quick release strap connector
US5219194 *Feb 28, 1992Jun 15, 1993Viking CorporationSecurity seal
US6126213 *Nov 10, 1999Oct 3, 2000Greif Bros. Corp. Of Ohio, Inc.Container clamping ring with improved lever and thumb latch
US6189935 *Feb 25, 1999Feb 20, 2001Lowry Computer Products, Inc.Printable tag with integral fastener
US6222128 *Apr 20, 1999Apr 24, 2001Arlington Industries, Inc.Cable support
US6490821Jul 24, 2000Dec 10, 2002Lowry Computer Products, Inc.Printable tag with integral fastener
US6695364 *Mar 7, 2002Feb 24, 2004Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Tamper proof package label and closure construction
US6911133Nov 24, 1998Jun 28, 2005Paul GrisonA portable input device provided to the policeman for recording data concerning the contraveing vehicle, a ticket medium to be issued to the vehicle owner and adapted to be inserted in the input device for recording input data
US6962014 *Apr 1, 2003Nov 8, 2005Mccabe Suellyn ARemovable cable labeling device
US7523576May 1, 2007Apr 28, 2009The Meyers Printing Companies, Inc.Point-of-purchase promotional article
US8769774 *Mar 21, 2012Jul 8, 2014Nike, Inc.Belt and/or buckle assembly
US20120174438 *Mar 21, 2012Jul 12, 2012Nike, Inc.Belt and/or buckle assembly
US20130047407 *Oct 29, 2012Feb 28, 2013Virgil Allen WatsonDetectable signage apparatus and method of making the same
WO1999027474A1 *Nov 24, 1998Jun 3, 1999Paul GrisonAutomated system for issuing and managing offence tickets
WO2001054103A2 *Jan 17, 2001Jul 26, 2001Olsen Jens Jacob ThorbjoernTag
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/665, 24/17.00R, 292/307.00R, 24/17.0AP
International ClassificationA45C13/42, A45C13/00, G09F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationG09F3/04, A45C13/42
European ClassificationA45C13/42, G09F3/04