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Publication numberUS3838516 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 1, 1974
Filing dateFeb 14, 1973
Priority dateJun 17, 1971
Publication numberUS 3838516 A, US 3838516A, US-A-3838516, US3838516 A, US3838516A
InventorsBorochaner S
Original AssigneeNat Waterpure Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water supply system for dental instruments
US 3838516 A
Abstract
A water supply system for dental instruments wherein an ion exchange unit is provided between the water supply and the instruments for the purpose of either softening or demineralizing the water, or both. Means are provided for reactivating the ion exchange bed either by passing a regeneration material through the bed or by using a replaceable cartridge containing a fresh ion exchange bed.
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United States Patent [1 1 [111 3,838,516 Borochaner 1 Oct. 1, 1974 1 WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM FOR DENTAL 3,204,767 9/1965 Borochaner 210 190 INSTRUMENTS 3,385,441 5/1968 Lyall 210/190 [75] Inventor: Stuart Borochaner, Levittown, Pa.

[73] Assignee: National Waterpure Corporation, Fallsington, Pa.

[22] Filed: Feb. 14, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 332,514

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 154,092, June 17, 1971, Pat. No. 3,719,594, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 852,293, Aug 22, 1969, Pat. No. 3,636,735.

[52] U.S. Cl. 32/22, 4/263 [51] Int. Cl. A61c 11/00 [58] Field of Search 32/22, 26, 1, 23; 210/24, 210/190; 4/263 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,783,688 12/1930 Wurlod 4/263 Primary Examiner-Louis G. Mancene Assistant ExaminerJ, Q. Lever Attorney, Agent, or FirmArthur A. Jacobs [57] ABSTRACT A water supply system for dental instruments wherein an ion exchange unit is provided between the water supply and the instruments for the purpose of either softening or demineralizing the water, or both, Means are provided for reactivating the ion exchange bed either by passing a regeneration material through the bed or by using a replaceable cartridge containing a fresh ion exchange bed.

7 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PATENTEBW H 1 3.888.516"

os/r/o/v A LL 204 WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM FOR DENTAL INSTRUMENTS This application is a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 154,092, filed June 17, 1971 now U.S. Pat. No. 3,719,594 which is, in turn, a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 852,293, filed Aug. 22, 1969 which issued as US. Pat. No. 3,636,735, dated Jan. 25, 1972.

This invention relates to a water treating system for dental instruments and it particularly relates to a system of this type wherein the treatment takes the form of either water softening, water demineralization or both.

Many dental instruments such as hand drills, syringes, water-picks and the like, require the use of flowing water. This water is ordinarily taken directly from the house or office water system. Most natural waters contain a lesser or greater degree of hardness caused by contaminants in the water such as calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, iron, iron oxide, etc. These hard water contaminants, after a certain period of use, tend to clog the instruments and sometimes even the conduits leading thereto. Furthermore, they may often interfere with or even contaminate the amalgams and other materials used by the dentist in the patients mouth.

It is one object of the present invention to overcome the above disadvantages, by providing a water treatment system interposed between the source of natural water and the dental instruments whereby contaminants in the water are largely removed before the water reaches the dental instruments. Another object of the present invention is to provide a system of the aforesaid type which is relatively simple in construction, easy to use and easy and inexpensive to maintain.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a diagramatic view of a system embodying the present invention wherein the water is both softened and demineralized by means of anionic and cationic ion-exchange means.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view showing the two positions of the control valve in the system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a diagramatic view of a system embodying the present invention wherein the water is merely softened by the use of an anionic ion-exchange means.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view showing the two positions of the control valve in the system of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a diagramatic view of a cartridge-type system substituted for the system of FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is a diagramatic view of a system embodying the present invention utilized only for demineralization wherein a cationic ion-exchange agent is used.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the three positions of the control valve in the system of FIG. 6.

Referring in greater detail to the figures of the drawings wherein similar reference characters refer to similar parts, there is shown in FIG. 1 a system, generally designated 10, comprising a plurality of dental instruments indicated schematically at 12. These instruments may be of any type requiring water, as for example, a syringe, one low-speed hand drill and two high-speed hand drills. The instruments 12 are provided with conduits 14 leading to a manifold 16. The manifold 16 may contain a selector valve (not shown), of standard type, to selectively apply the water to the desired instruments.

The manifold 16 is connected to a conduit 18 leading into the top of an anionic resin container 20 having a transparent window 21. Alternatively, the entire container may be constructed of transparent plastic or other suitable transparent material. A gauge may also be optionally provided on the outer surface of the container. Above the container 20, the conduit 18 is connected to a conduit 22 leading into a conduit 24. Interposed in the conduit 22 is avalve 26. The conduit 24 leads from a regeneration container 28, having a removable cap 29, to a conduit 30, and this conduit 24 is provided with a valve 32 between its connection with the conduit 22 and its connection with the conduit 30.

The conduit 30 leads from a valve housing 34, below the container 20, into the top of a cation resin container 36 having a transparent slot 37. This container may also be made wholly transparent and may be provided with a gauge, if so desired. The valve housing 34 encompasses a control valve 38 such as shown in two positions in FIG. 2. A valve housing 40 is similarly provided below the container 36 and is provided with a control valve (not shown) identical to the valve 38 in housing 34.

A drain duct 42 leads from valve housing 34 into a drain duct 44 which leads from valve housing 40 into a drain pipe 46.

The drain pipe 46 extends from an expectorant bowl 50, of standard design, to a drainage outlet (not shown). Above the bowl 50 is the outlet end 52 of a stand pipe 54 leading from a source of tap water. A standard type of shut-off valve 56 is provided at the lower end of pipe 54 and a spigot valve 58 is provided in the pipe adjacent the outlet end 52 above the bowl 50. A conduit 60 extends from the container 28 into the pipe 54 and a conduit 62 extends from the bottom of valve housing 40 into the pipe 54.

In normal use, the valve 56 is opened and the valves 26 and 32 are closed, while the valves in valve housings 34 and 40 are in position A shown in FIG. 2. Water then flows from the source through conduit 62 and through the cationic and anionic ion-exchange beds, through the conduit 18, through the manifold 16 to the particular instrument or instruments designated as 12. During this passage, the water is both softened and demineralized.

When it is necessary to regenerate the anionic and cationic beds, the following procedure is used: In the first step, the valve 56 is closed, the valve 26 is opened, the valve 32 is closed, the valve 38 in housing 34 is placed in position B shown in FIG. 2 and the similar valve in housing 40 is in position A as shown in FIG. 2.

The cap 29 is then removed from container 28 and a caustic, such as sodium hydroxide or the like, is inserted into container 28, after which the cap is closed. Water flows from the source through conduit 54 and conduit 60, through the container 28, to form a caustic solution. This solution then flows down by gravity through conduits 24 and 22 into the container 20. The caustic solution continues to flow through container 20, regenerating the bed, and then flowsthrough drain line 42 and drain line 44 to the drain pipe 46. The valve 56 is maintained open for a predetermined time for regeneration and flushing. Thereafter. the water supply is stopped by closing valve 56 and valve 26 is closed, valve 32 is opened, valve 38 in housing 34 is sent into position A and the valve in housing 40 is set in position B. The cap 29 on container 28 is opened and an acid solution, such as HCl or the like, is inserted. The cap 29 is then closed and the valve 56 is opened. Water then flows through pipe 54 and conduit 60 to container 28 and the resulting aqueous acid solution flows through valve 32 in line 24 and through conduit 30 into container 36. It flows through the cationic bed in container 36 for a predetermined time to obtain regeneration and flushing and passes through drain line 44 to drain pipe 46, after which the valve 56 is closed. The valve 56 is then opened, the valves 26 and 32 are closed and the valves in housings 34 and 40 are placed in position A, so that the system is now again in position for normal use.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate a system for only water softening. This system, generally designated 100, com prises instruments 102 connected through conduits 104 to a manifold 106 similar to manifold 16. A conduit 108 leads from manifold 106 to the topof an ionexchange resin container 1 10 having a transparent win dow 111.Here, too, the container may, optionally, be made entirely transparent and a gauge may optionally be provided. A conduit 112 leads from the bottom of container 110 into a stand pipe 114, a valve 116 being interposed in the conduit 112. The valve 116 is shown in two positions, A and B, in FIG. 4, this valve acting as the control valve in the systems.

The pipe 1 14 is connected at its lower end to a source of tap water through a supply valve 118, while, at its upper end, pipe 114 is provided with a curved outlet end 120 positioned over an expectorant bowl 122. A spigot valve 124 is provided adjacent the outlet end 120. A drain pipe 126 descends from bowl 122, leading to drainage.

A conduit 128 leads from pipe 114, through a valve 130, to a regeneration container 132 having a removable closure cap 133. Leading from the opposite side of container 132 is a conduit 134 that connects with conduit 128. A drain line 136 connects the valve 116 with pipe 126.

In operation, during normal use, the valve 118 is open, the valve 116 is in position A and the valve 130 is closed. The water flows from pipe 114 through conduit 1 12, valve 116, container 110 and line 108, to the manifold 106.

I a regeneration material, such as sodium chloride or the like, is inserted, and the cap 133 is closed. Valve 118 is then opened, and the flow is through conduit 128, and valve 130 to the container 132, from where the salt solution flows through conduit 134 and through container 110 where it regenerates the ion-exchange resin bed. It then passes through valve 116 to drain line 136 and then to drainage pipe 126. After a predetermined interval to allow regeneration and flushing, the water is turned off by valve 118 and valve 116 is placed in position A. The system is now again ready for use.

In FIG. 5 there is shown a system of a simplified type. This system, generally designated 200, comprises the conduits designated 202 leading to the dental instruments (not shown) from a manifold 204 similar to those described above. Leading from the manifold 204 is an elbow pipe 206 having an externally threaded connector208. This connector 208 is adapted to releasably receive a threaded bushing mounted on the top of a cylindrical cartridge 210 having a transparent window 211. Again, a wholly transparent cartridge may be used, as may also a gauge. A similar connecting means to that shown at 208 is provided at 212 on an elbow pipe 214. The pipe 214 leads into a stand pipe 216 connected at its lower end to a source of tap water through a valve 218. A spigot valve 220 is provided at the upper end of pipe 216 adjacent to a curved outlet and 222 positioned above an expectorantbowl 224. A drain pipe 226 leads from the bowl 224 to drainage.

in this system, with valve 218 open, the water flows through pipe 214 and through the cartridge 210, containing an ion-exchange resin bed, to the pipe 206 and then to the manifold 204. When the ion-exchange resin is shown to be exhausted as determined by a change of color seen through window 21 1, the cartridge 210 is removed and is replaced by a new cartridge.

This cartridge system can be used either for the anionic or cationic resin bed. It can also be used for a mixture of both the anionic and cationic resins. Such mixtures are commercially available and are, for example, sold under the name lonac NM- by the lonac Chemical Sybron Corporation, Birmingham, New Jersey.

in FIGS. 6 and 7 there is shown a system. generally designated 300, which is used with a cationic ionexchange resin and which comprises conduits, designated 302, leading from dental instruments to a manifold 304 similar to those described above. The manifold 304 is connected by a conduit 306 to a housing 308, which is in direct fluid communication with a container 310 having a transparent window 311. Here, too, the container may be made entirely transparent, and a gauge may also optionally be provided. The housing 308 is provided with a feed inlet 309 at its side. At the bottom of container 310 is a valve housing 312 containing a valve 314 shown in various positions in FIG. 7. A conduit 316 leads from the valve housing 312 to a standpipe 318. The pipe 318 is connected to a source of tap water at its lower end and a supply valve 320, is interposed therein. At its upper end, the pipe 318 is provided with a curved outlet 322 situated over an expectorant bowl 324. A spigot 326 is provided adjacent the outlet 322.

The bowl 324 is provided with a drain pipe 328 leading to drainage. A conduit 330 leads from the housing 308 to the standpipe 318 and a valve 332 is interposed in this conduit 330. A conduit 334 leads into the drain pipe 328 from the valve housing 312.

In normal operation, the valve 320 is opened and water flows through conduit 316 and through valve 312, which is in position A, as shown in FIG. 7, through the ion-exchange resin in container 310, through housing'308, and through conduit 306 to the manifold 304. During this flow, valve 332 is closed.

For regeneration, valve 320 is closed, valve 332 is opened, and valve 314 is in position B. An acid solution is then fed through inlet 309 in housing 308 after the valve 314 has been repositioned to position C. After the required amount of acid has been inserted, it is retained in the container 310 for a predetermined interval of time sufficient to regenerate the cationic ionexchange resin in container 310. Then valve 314 is placed in position B, valves 320 and 332 are opened, and the spigot valve 326 is also opened. The water now flows through conduits 318 and 330 to the housing 308 and then down through container 310 to valve 314 from which it passes through drain line 334 to the drain pipe 328. The spigot 326 is open to permit water to blend with the acid solution being ejected through the outlet 332 in order to dilute the acid as it flows through the drain. The flushing action proceeds until the correct color is indicated through window 311, at which time, the spigot valve 326 is closed, the valve 332 is closed and the valve 314 is set to position A. The sys tem is now again ready for use.

The invention claimed is:

1. A water supply system for dental instruments comprising at least one container holding a bed of ionexchange material, at least one water-utilizing dental instrument in fluid communication with said container, a water-supply conduit leading from a source of water to said container, said conduit having a selectivelyoperable shut-off valve and also having an outlet leading to an expectorant bowl, a drain pipe leading to drainage from said expectorant bowl, and means for reactivating the ion-exchange bed when it nears exhaustion.

2. The system of claim 1 wherein said means for reactivating comprises a chamber positioned above said container, said chamber being constructed to hold renewable amounts of an ionexchange regenerating material, said chamber being in fluid connection with said conduit leading from the source of water, and also being in fluid connection with said container, and said container being in selective fluid connection with said water-supply conduit and with a drainage conduit through a selectively-positioned control valve, said drainage conduit being in fluid connection with said drain pipe.

3. The system of claim 2 wherein there are two containers, one of said containers holding an anionic ionexchange bed and the other holding a cationic ionexchange bed. said regeneration chamber being in selective fluid communication with each of said containers, and a separate control valve in operative connection with each container. 1

4. The system of claim 3 wherein said containers are linearly arranged to permit flow of water from said water-supply conduit through both containers when the respective control valves are arranged in predetermined positions.

5. The system of claim 1 wherein said container is a replaceable cartridge, and said means for reactivating comprises releasable connections between said cartridge and conduits leading respectively from said water-supply conduit and from said dental instrument, a cartridge having an exhausted ion-exchange bed being replaceable by a cartridge having a fresh bed.

6. The system of claim 1 wherein said container is provided with a regeneration feed inlet housing at one end, said housing being in fluid communication with said container and having a feed inlet for receiving fluid regeneration material, said housing also being in fluid communication with said water-supply conduit, a control valve at the opposite end of said container, and conduit means connecting said control valve to said water-supply conduit and to said drain pipe, said control valve being selectively adjustable to open or close communication between both of said last-mentioned conduits and said container.

7. The system of claim 1 wherein said container is at least partially transparent.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1783688 *Nov 20, 1928Dec 2, 1930Wurlod LuisSpittoon of variable height fit for dentists or physicians
US3204767 *Feb 20, 1964Sep 7, 1965Stuart BorochanerAutomatic washing machines with water-softening means
US3385441 *Feb 8, 1966May 28, 1968Culligan IncCompact water softener
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5044952 *Oct 31, 1989Sep 3, 1991Castellini, S.P.A.Device to prevent water stagnation in dental supply circuits
US5275558 *Dec 15, 1992Jan 4, 1994Seney John SDental handpiece, bur mount operating system
US6290498 *Aug 13, 1999Sep 18, 2001Claude LachapelleWater valve for dental handpiece
US8017082 *Apr 27, 2009Sep 13, 2011Ecolab Usa Inc.Apparatus and method for making a peroxycarboxylic acid
Classifications
U.S. Classification433/97, 4/263, 433/84
International ClassificationB01J47/00, A61C17/00, B01J47/02, A61C17/14
Cooperative ClassificationB01J47/024
European ClassificationB01J47/02B2