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Publication numberUS3838644 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 1, 1974
Filing dateAug 29, 1973
Priority dateAug 31, 1972
Also published asDE2242930A1, DE2242930C2
Publication numberUS 3838644 A, US 3838644A, US-A-3838644, US3838644 A, US3838644A
InventorsJohannes A, Prochnow J
Original AssigneeRheinmetall Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nested hollow-charge subsidiary projectiles
US 3838644 A
Abstract
A hollow-charge subsidiary projectile for firing by means of a carrier projectile includes a subsidiary projectile body which contains a shaped charge. A detonator spacing tube is disposed at the front of the subsidiary projectile body and detonator case is located at the rear of the subsidiary projectile body. A hollow recess is defined at the forward end of the shaped charge and accommodates the rear end of an identical subsidiary projectile. This arrangement permits a plurality of nested subsidiary projectiles to be accommodated within a single carrier projectile.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Prochnow et al.

1 Oct. 1,1974

[ NESTED HOLLOW-CHARGE SUBSIDIARY PROJECTILES Inventors: .lurgen Prochnow; Alfred Johannes,

both of Dusseldorf, Germany Assignee: Rheinmetall GmbH, Dusseldorf,

Germany 22 Filed: Aug. 29, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 392,619

Primary ExaminerVerlin R. Pendegrass Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Williamson, Bains & Moore [5 7] v ABSTRACT A hollow-charge subsidiary projectile for firing by means of a carrier projectile includes a subsidiary prol l Foreign Application y Data jectile body which contains a shaped charge. A deto- Aug. 31, 1972 Germany 2242930 nator spacing tube is disposed at the front of the subsidiary projectile body and detonator case is located at [52] US. Cl. 102/56, l02/7.'2, 102/241-1C the rear of the subsidiary projectile body. A hollow re- [51] Int. Cl F02k 1/08 cess is defined at the forward end of the shaped [58] Field of Search 102/7.2, 24 HC, 56 charge and accommodates the rear end of an identical subsidiary projectile. This arrangement permits a plu- [56] References Cited rality of nested subsidiary projectiles to be accommo- UNITED STATES PATENTS dated within a single carrier projectile.

2,837,996 6/1958 Klotz 102/24 HC 7 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures NESTED HOLLOW-CHARGE SUBSIDIARY PROJ EC TILES BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention concerns hollow-charge subsidiary projectiles which can be fired by means of a carrier projectile.

As is known, a hollow-charge projectile may consist of a projectile body containing a shaped charge retained by a typically conical insert, a detonator spacing tube being fitted at the forward end of the body and a detonator case being fitted at the rearward end. The detonator spacing tube causes detonation to occur at the correct distance of the insert from the target, and this tube is therefore of a specific length. Since hollowcharge projectiles should, as far as possible, be prevented from spinning, they are often provided with stabilizing vanes. The carrier projectiles may be fired with or without spin.

In order to increase the likelihood of a hit when firing at armoured targets on the ground, carrier projectiles containing a number of hollow-charge projectiles are fired. At a certain distance from the target the subsidiary projectiles are ejected from the carrier projectile, for example by detonating a charge contained in the carrier projectile, whereupon the detonators of the subsidiary projectiles become live. These subsidiary projectiles then continue to travel within a certain zone of scatter and detonate individually upon impact.

It is desirable to accommodate as many subsidiary projectiles as possible in a carrier projectile of given dimensions. For this reason efforts have been made to reduce the diameters of the subsidiary projectiles to a minimum by providing them with stabilizing vanes that can be folded inwards so that the projectiles can be packed tightly together in the radial direction.

The object of the present invention is to further improve utilization of the space within a carrier projectile.

According to the invention a hollow-charge subsidiary projectile for firing by means of a carrier projectile consists of a body which contains a shaped charge and at the front end of which is disposed a detonator spacing tube and at the rear end of which is a detonator case having stabilizing vanes which can be'folded inwards, wherein the space directly in front of the charge is so shaped and dimensioned that it can accommodate at least a part of the rear end of a further subsidiary projectile of like shape. Thus, the subsidiary projectiles can be nested one within the other since the space that is defined by the front of the charge can be used for accommodating a part of the rear of an adjacent subsidiary projectile. The greater the number of subsidiary projectiles that are placed one behind the other, the greater is the saving in space; if the length of the projectiles before insertion is n, then when x subsidiary projectiles are placed one behind the other, the maximum saving in space in the longitudinal direction will be n+ (x-l). (rt-a), where a is that portion of the projectile that is accommodated in the projectile to its rear.

For the purpose of enabling the projectiles to be nested one within the other, the inside diameter of the substantially cylindrical detonator spacing tube which is open at the front is made greater than the outside diameter of the projectile body and of the detonator case with the inwardly folded stabilizing vanes.

To enable the subsidiary projectiles to be firmly held and supported in the carrier projectile and to be ejected in a reliable manner, each of the subsidiary projectiles preferably has a shoulder at its forward end against which a rear shoulder of the next projectile bears. As will be explained later, this arrangement can be achieved by means of various constructions.

However, the arrangement may be such that the detonator spacing tube is slidable telescopically over the projectile body against a spring force, and the subsidiary projectiles in the carrier projectile bear against each other by the front and rear edges of their bodies. This arrangement is particularly advantageous when there are only a few subsidiary projectiles disposed one behind the other, since the foremost projectile can be fitted in the telescoped condition and a further saving in space is effected. The spring force is preferably applied by a helical spring within the front part of the projectile body, the inside diameter of the spring being greater than the greatest outside dimension of the detonator case with the stabilizing vanes folded inwards. It may then be necessary to provide a guide channel in the detonator spacing tube which engages a guide projection on the projectile body and subsidiary projectile is extended in the correct manner. Such guide channel is in the majority of cases, desirable since after the subsidiary projectiles have been ejected, a greater deflection from their previous path of flight and thus an increased scatter effect is achieved as a result of aerodynamic effects at the channel. It will be appreciated that a channel or other feature serving this aerodynamic purpose can also be provided when other forms of subsidiary projectile are used.

FIGURES OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the hollow-charge subsidiary projectile;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 1, but showing modified form of the hollowcharge subsidiary projectile; and

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 1, but showing still another modification of the hollow-charge subsidiary projectile.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The hollow-charge subsidiary projectile shown in FIG. 1 has a body 1 with a hollow charge 2 accommodated therein, an insert 3 being fitted forwardly of the charge. Secured at the rear end of the projectile body 1 is a detonator case 4 which contains a detonator, not shown in detail, and on the exterior of which are fitted hinged stabilizing vanes 5.

Disposed at the forward end of the projectile body 1 is a substantially cylindrical detonator spacing tube 6a which is open at the front and the inside diameter of which is greaterthan the outside diameter of the projectile body 1 and of the detonator4 when the stabilizing vanes 5 on the case of the latter are folded inwards. To make these relationships clear, a further subsidiary projectile is shown in dot-and-dash lines in front of the above-mentioned subsidiary projectile, the rearward end of this second subsidiary projectile being accommodated within the detonator spacing tube 6a, and the detonator of said second projectile projecting into the projectile body 1 so that it lies close in front of the insert 3. It will also be seen that the detonator spacing tube has, near its rearward end an internally shouldered rim 7, and that the length by which the detonator spacing tube 6a extends over the projectile body 1 is such that the internally shouldered rim 7 of the next subsidiary projectile can bear on the forward edge of detonator spacing tube 6a; it will be understood that the detonator spacing tube 6a must be rigidly secured to the projectile body 1 and should also be sufficiently stable to enable the forces due to inertia to be transmitted to the next subsidiary projectile when a first projectile is fired and ejected from the carrier projectile.

The subsidiary projectile illustrated in FIG.- 2 also comprises a body I with a hollow charge 2 and insert 3, and a detonator case 4 and stabilizing vanes 5. The projecting body is here provided with a collor 8 against which bears a thin-walled detonator spacing tube 6b. In this embodiment however, each of the subsidiary projectiles is supported by an internally shouldered rim 10 at the rear end of the projectile body 1, and each such rim can be supported on the front edge 11 of the subsidiary projectile disposed rearwardly thereof.

For this reason, it is not necessary for the detonator spacing tube 6b to be of particularly stable form since it does not transmit the ejection force, and thus a certain saving in weigh can be achieved.

The arrangement seen in FIG. 3 is based on a somewhat different principle. In the inserted condition as illustrated, the detonator spacing tube 60 is slidable telescopically over the outer periphery of the projectile body 1 which, as in the embodiments shown in FIGS.

l and 2, contains a hollow charge 2 and insert 3, and

position after tlTe subsidiary projectiles have 55am ejected from the carrier projectile. The helical spring 12 is so dimensioned that its inside diameter is greater than the outside diameter of the detonator case 4 including the inwardly folded stabilizing vanes 5, as shown in broken outline in FIG. 3.

The detonator spacing tube 6c is provided with two elongated slots. Slot 13 extends axially along tube 60 and has at the lower end an end portion (not shown in the drawing) which extends tagentially with respect to tube 60. The other slot has no reference numeral but is shown in solid lines at the end of spacing tube 60 adjacent the next projectile, shown in dash-dotted lines. This latter slot extends helically about spacing tube 6c and is provided with a similar tangential end portion at its lower end (not shown in the drawing).

The ends of spring 12 are both bent outwardly. One end extends through body 1 where it is fixed and into slot 13; it acts as a guide member during the forward torque-biased; its free end projection extends into the other slot and may exert a rotational movement upon release once the projectiles separate. Said rotational What is claimed is:

l. A hollow-charge subsidiary projectile for firing by means of a carrier projectile, the subsidiary projectile consisting of a body which contains a shaped charge and at the front end of which is disposed a detonator spacing tube and at the rear end of which is a detonator case having stabilizing vanes which can be folded inwards, wherein the space directly in front of the charge is so shaped and dimensioned that it can accommodate at least a part of the rear end of a further subsidiary projectile of like shape.

2. A subsidiary projectile according to claim 1, wherein the inside diameter of the detonator spacing tube, which is open at the front, is greater than the outside diameter of the projectile body and of the detonator case with the stabilizing vanes folded inwards.

3. A subsidiary projectile according to claim 2, wherein the detonator spacing tube is rigidly connected to the projectile body, extends over the projectile body at that of its ends presented to the charge, and is adapted to be supported by the forward edge of a similar detonator spacing tube of a further subsidiary projectile disposed to its rear.

4. A subsidiary projectile according to claim 2, wherein the projectile body is rigidly connected to the detonator spacing tube and has at that end adjacent to the detonator a rim adapted to be supported on the forward edge of the body of a similar subsidiary projectile disposed to its rear.

5. A subsidiary projectile according to claim 2, wherein the detonator spacing tube can be pushed telescopically over the projectile body against a spring force, and the projectile bodyis adapted to be supported on the forward edge of the body of a similar subsidiary projectile.

' 6. A subsidiary projectile according to claim 5, wherein a helical spring is fitted in the forward portion of the projectile body, the inside diameter of the spring being greater than the greatest outside dimension of the detonator case with the stabilizing vanes folded inwards.

7. A subsidiary projectile according to claim 5, wherein there is a guide channel in the detonator spacing tube and a cooperating guide projection on the projectile body for guiding movement of the detonator movement of spacing tube 6c. In the embodiment of 0 spacing tube relative to the projectile body.

FIG. 3, spring 12 is not a compression spring, but

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2837996 *May 4, 1954Jun 10, 1958Seismograph Service CorpExplosive charge
US3093072 *Jan 30, 1957Jun 11, 1963Pigman George LSpin-induced dispersal bomb
US3580174 *Feb 18, 1969May 25, 1971Oerlikon Buehrle AgProjectile with hollow explosive charge
FR999974A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3946672 *Aug 13, 1974Mar 30, 1976Thiokol CorporationRocket propelled projectile
US4736682 *Nov 7, 1985Apr 12, 1988Rheinmetall GmbhFuse for self-destroying shell
US4770100 *Jul 16, 1987Sep 13, 1988Rheinmetall GmbhHollow charge subsidiary projectile including a projectile body and a fuze spacer at the front
US4955938 *Nov 29, 1988Sep 11, 1990Rheinmetall GmbhAmmunition, preferably for use in high-angle fire
US4989517 *Mar 29, 1982Feb 5, 1991The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyTandem bomblet
US5046424 *Jul 30, 1990Sep 10, 1991Rheinmetall GmbhFuze for a bomblet projectile
US5988071 *May 1, 1998Nov 23, 1999Lockheed Martin CorporationPenetrator having multiple impact segments, including an explosive segment
US6021716 *Jul 18, 1997Feb 8, 2000Lockheed Martin CorporationPenetrator having multiple impact segments
DE102005043078A1 *Sep 10, 2005Mar 15, 2007Diehl Bgt Defence Gmbh & Co. KgSuchzündermunition
DE102005043078B4 *Sep 10, 2005Jun 14, 2007Diehl Bgt Defence Gmbh & Co. KgSuchzündermunition
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/476
International ClassificationF42B12/58, F42B12/02
Cooperative ClassificationF42B12/58
European ClassificationF42B12/58