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Publication numberUS3838679 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 1, 1974
Filing dateDec 28, 1973
Priority dateAug 2, 1971
Publication numberUS 3838679 A, US 3838679A, US-A-3838679, US3838679 A, US3838679A
InventorsWelch J
Original AssigneeWelch J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper pack holding rack for a fireplace
US 3838679 A
Abstract
A fireplace rack has sockets formed in various configurations for holding packs of newspaper in spaced relationship in a fireplace for burning. Sinuous bands defining spaced upward projections form paper-holding slots between them. Spaced bands are supported on a base in parallel relationship to form a rack for holding paper packs, or in upwardly flaring relationship or in horizontal relationship to hold logs. Alternatively, upwardly opening slots may be formed between upwardly convergent strips. Wire or rod members can be bent in U-shape and held in spaced relationship to provide slots for holding paper packs and also to form a cradle between opposite upwardly projecting rows of rods to hold logs. Upwardly-opening paper pack holding slots can be spaced apart by forming the slots between wire or rod loops of U-shape, or by a sinuous wire or rod arranged in an upright plane, or two of such wires or rods can be arranged in spaced upright planes. A wire or rod can be convoluted in loops disposed either in a horizontal plane or in a vertical plane forming sockets for rolled paper packs.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 1 Oct. 1, 1974 1 1 PAPER PACK HOLDING RACK FOR A FIREPLACE [76] Inventor: James W. Welch, PO. Box 455,

Lake Stevens, Wash. 98258 22 Filed: Dec. 28, 1973 21 Appl. No.: 429,185

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No, 167,993, Aug. 2, 1971,

abandoned.

[52] US. Cl 126/165, 211/60 R, 211/120, D7/207 [51] Int. Cl. F23h 13/02 [58] Field of Search 126/164, 165, 298; 211/120, 60 A, 60 R; 248/165; D7/207, 212

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,430,624 11/1947 Vollmer 211/120 2,478,809 8/1949 Deal 211,120

2,530,307 11/1950 Leach 211/120 3,669,092 I 6/1972 Bolster 126/165 3,670,714 6/1972 Eyges l 126/165 Dl97,l02 12/1963 Pryor D7/207 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 173,344 l/l922 Great Britain 126/165 Primary ExaminerWilliam F. ODea Assistant ExaminerPeter D. Ferguson Attorney, Agent, or FirmRobert W. Beach [5 7] ABSTRACT A fireplace rack has sockets formed in various configurations for holding packs of newspaper in spaced relationship in a fireplace for burning. Sinuous bands defining spaced upward projections form paper-holding slots between them. Spaced bands are supported on a base in parallel'relationship to form a rack for holding paper packs, or in upwardly flaring relationship or in horizontal relationship to hold logs. Alternatively, upwardly opening slots may be formed between upwardly convergent strips. Wire or rod members can be bent in U-shape and held in spaced relationship to provide slots for holding paper packs and also to form a cradle between opposite upwardly projecting rows of rods to hold logs. Upwardly-opening paper pack holding slots can be spaced apart by forming the slots between wire or rod loops of U-shape, or by a sinuous wire or rod arranged in an upright plane, or two of such wires or rods can be arranged in spaced upright planes. A wire or rod can be convoluted in loops disposed either in a horizontal plane or in a vertical plane forming sockets for rolled paper packs.

11 Claims, 18 Drawing Figures PAIENIEBnm 1 m4 mums ATTOA NEV PAPER PACK HOLDING RACK FOR A FIREPLACE This is a continuation of application Ser. No. l67,993, filed Aug. 2, 1971, and now abandoned.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a fireplace rack construction forming sockets in which packs of newspaper can be placed readily in spaced relationship to be burned efficiently.

A further object is to provide a fireplace rack structure capable of holding packs of newspaper for burning, which also can be used for burning logs, either without conversion, or which can be converted quickly and easily to a condition for effectively burning logs or other wood.

It is also an object to provide such a paper pack holding rack construction which is attractive in appearance and which can be constructed economically.

An additional object is to provide a paper pack holding fireplace rack structure that can be removed easily from the fireplace when desired and can be arranged compactly for storage.

FIG. 1 is a top perspective of a preferred type of paper pack holding fireplace rack showing components in exploded relationship. FIG. 2 is a top perspective of the rack with the components disposed in one type of assembled relationship, and FIG. 3 is an end elevation of the fireplace rack assembled in the relationship of FIG. 2. FIG. 4 is a top perspective of the fireplace rack shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, with components in a different relationship, and FIG. 5 is an end elevation of the fireplace rack with the components in the relationship shown in FIG. 4. FIG. 6 is a top perspective of the same fireplace rack with components in still a different relationship, and FIG. 7 is an end elevation of the fireplace rack with components in the relationship shown in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a top perspective of another type of paper pack holding fireplace rack, and FIG. 9 is an end elevation of the rack shown in FIG. 8. FIG. 10 is a top perspective of a further modified form of paper pack holding fireplace rack, and FIG. 11 is an end elevation of the rack of FIG. 10. FIG. 12 is an end elevation of the rack of FIGS. 10 and 11, showing components in a different relationship.

FIG. 13 is a top perspective of a different form of paper pack holding fireplace rack.

FIG. 14 is a top perspective of a paper pack holding fireplace rack somewhat similar to FIG. 13, but of modified construction.

FIG. 15 is a top perspective of a paper pack holding fireplace rack of still another type, and FIG. 16 is a top perspective of a modification of the rack shown in FIG. I5.

FIG. 17 is a top perspective of an alternative type of paper pack holding fireplace rack. FIG. 18 is a top perspective of a rack somewhat similar to the rack of FIG. 17, but showing a modified type of structure.

Packs of newspaper, whether folded or rolled, cannot be burned conveniently or efficiently in conventional basket types of fireplace grates. If such paper packs are simply laid in a conventional basket grate, sufficient circulation of air between them is not afforded to support combustion readily. It is therefore necessary either to stir the paper packs frequently in order to expose different parts of them for burning, or else it is necessary to take apart the packs of paper and wad up each sheet independently. In either case, much work and annoyance is involved. effective production of heat is not obtained, and uniformity of combustion cannot be achieved.

The racks of the present invention provide effective supports for packs of newspaper in a fireplace either in folded condition, or in rolled condition, which packs will be spaced apart to provide good circulation of air around them to enable them to burn uniformly and efficiently. The racks provide sockets opening upwardly and/or horizontally, into which the newspaper packs can be inserted. Such sockets are spaced apart to dispose the paper packs in generally parallel relationship.

In the preferred type of rack construction shown in FIGS. 1 to 7, inclusive, the paper pack holding sockets are formed by a convoluted member 1 in the form of a sinuous band which is disposed in an upright plane. Upper ends of pairs of adjacent straight stretches of the band are connected by bends 2 forming downwardlyopening return bends or folds. The lower ends of adjacent return bends are connected by bends 2. Upwardly-opening socket slots 3 are thereby formed between adjacent return bends. As shown in FIG. 1, for example, the length of each slot is several times as great as its width. Slots 4 open downwardly between the straight band stretches of each return bend. Such straight stretches of at least some return bends are connected rigidly together in parallel relationship by stiffening and support bridges 5 spanning the downwardly opening slots 4 to former abutments nearer the lower edge portion of the sinuous band than theupper edge portion.

Each sinuous band l'constitutes a planar rack component and two such rack components can be mounted in spaced generally parallel relationship on a stand 6 to complete the rack. For holding flat paper packs for burning, the rack components 1 are supported in upright positions in parallel planes on the stand 6, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The stand is formed of two longitudinal bars 7 having their opposite ends supported by legs 8, the upper end portions of which preferably project a substantial distance above the longitudinal bars, as shown in FIGS. 1 to 7.

The longitudinal bars 7 are connected at intervals by parallel crossbars 9 spaced lengthwise of the longitudinal bars 7. At least two of such crossbars are required, but more of them may be provided if desired, four being shown in the drawings. Rack-locating lugs 10 arranged in pairs and spaced lengthwise of the crossbars 9 project upward from such crossbars for forming notches between them. Such lugs are arranged in rows parallel to the longitudinal bars 7 and the lugs of each pair are spaced apart a distance just slightly greater than the thickness of the band rack components 1.

The number and location of the crossbars 9 of the stand 6 correspond to locations of the supporting abutments 5 of the rack components. Also, the horizontal thickness of the crossbars 9 is less than the spacing between the stretches of the sinuous bands I connected by the abutment bridges 5. Consequently, each sinuous band rack component can be assembled on the stand 6 by sliding the downwardly opening slots 4 having bridges 5 over crossbars 9 of the stand. The rack components will be located in the notches between the upstanding lugs 10 of the lug pairs, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 with the cross bars disposed between the upper and lower edges of the planar rack components.

Folded packs of newspapers can be slid downwardly into the upwardly opening slots 3 between adjacent return bends of the band 1 to support them in parallel upright planes. Adjacent newspaper packs will thus be spaced apart a distance at least equal to the spacing between the pairs of upright band stretches connected by the bends 2. While newspaper packs could be supported reasonably satisfactorily by a single band rack mounted on a stand, it is preferred that each crossbar 9 have two pairs of lugs 10 upstanding from it to locate two sinuous band rack components in the spaced parallel relationship shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Each newspaper pack is thus held at spaced locations. The spacing between such band racks should be substantially less than the length of the newspaper packs to be held in the slots of the rack components.

The width of the upwardly opening slots 3 are such that a flat folded newspaper pack will have reasonably good frictional engagement with the sides of the slots so that a newspaper pack can be held in a higher or lower position in a slot as may be desired. The bottom of each slot 3 is closed by bends 2 so as to limit the extent to which a newspaper pack can be moved downward in such a slot. The length of each leg 8 projecting downward below a longitudinal bar 7 will be greater than the distance between the abutments and the lower edge portion of the rack component so that such lower edge portion will be spaced above the floor of the fireplace on which the legs 8 rest a distance greater than the vertical thickness of the crossbars 9. Such proportioning of the stand and the rack components will support the racks so as to provide adequate circulation of air below packs of newspapers held in the slots 3 to support combustion of the papers adequately.

If it should be desired to burn packs of newspapers which are longer, or if it should be desired to burn sticks of wood or compacted sawdust synthetic logs, one or both of the rack components 1 can be disposed in upwardly flared relationship to the stand, as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. In order to hold a rack component stably in such an inclined position, lugs 11 projecting downwardly from the bottoms of the crossbars 9 are provided in positions spaced longitudinally of the crossbars from the pairs of upwardly projecting racklocating lugs 10. Such lugs 11 project transversely of the crossbars 9 beyond at least one upright side of each bar, as shown in FIG. 1, so as to be engaged by the edge of a straight band stretch of the convoluted band 1 below a crossbar.

One edge of the stiffening and support bridges 5 of each rack component will still rest on the upper sides of the crossbars 9 between the upwardly projecting lugs 10. The spacing between a lower lug 11 and the pairs of upper lugs between which a rack component is located will determine the degree of slope of the rack component when it is supported by the crossbars and engaged with the lower lugs 11, as shown in FIG. 5. For most purposes a slope of each rack component of ap proximately 45 to horizontal is satisfactory. Sticks or compacted sawdust synthetic logs can then be laid in the trough or cradle between the upwardly flaring rack components.

lflarge logs are to be burned in the fireplace, the rack components 1 can be removed, as indicated in FIG. 1, and the logs simply supported directly on the crossbars 9 of the stand. In order to avoid the trouble of removing the rack components and storing them, however, the

rack components can simply be laid flat on the stand 6. The rack components will still be disposed with their support bridges 5 located between the upwardly projecting lugs 10 and the portions of the rack components which normally project above such bridges can be swung outwardly and downwardly to rest on the longitudinal bar 7 of the stand, as shown in FIG. 7.

It is preferred that the portions of the stand legs 8 projecting upwardly above the longitudinal bars 7 be of a length exceeding the thickness of the rack components 1 so that the upper portions of such legs can be engaged by logs to deter them from rolling off the grate or onto a portion of a rack component 1 overhanging the stand 6. Also, the rack components can be disposed in the positions of FIG. 7 parallel to the longitudinal bars 7 and crossbars 9 of the stand 6 for storage, if desired.

In the rack shown in FIGS. Band 9, two rack components 12 are inclined upwardly and toward each other. Their upper edge portions are connected by parallel spaced cross strips 13 joined at the corners 14 to the upper ends of strip portions 15 projecting upwardly from margins 15 of the rack sides 12. The slots 16 between the rack side strip portions 15 and the spaces 17 between the rack top strip portions 13 form sockets for receiving newspaper packs in parallel relationship. as discussed in connection with FIGS. 1 to 7.

The lower edge portions of the rack sides 12 are supported and held in spaced relationship by spreader strips 18. The opposite end portions 19 of these spreader strips are bent to be disposed in face-to-face relationship with the rack sides, and such end portions are suitably bonded to the rack sides. Such spreader strips will maintain the rack sides 12 in the desired inclined attitudes which may be, for example, 60 to horizontal.

The construction of the rack shown in FIGS. 10, 11 and 12 is similar to that of FIGS. 8 and 9, except that the rack sides may be more inclined, and the horizontal top strips of the rack are not used. Opposite sides of the rack base are formed by parallel strips 21 spaced apart in the same plane, from which strips the opposite rack side components 22 slope upwardly toward each other. The upper edge portions 23 of the rack sides are bent upward to form angles 24.

The longitudinal base strips 21 of the rack are connected by transverse spreader strips 25 so as to establish the angle of upward inclination of the rack sides 22. The height of such rack sides and the length of the spreader strips may be selected so that the slope of the sides may be approximately 50 relative to horizontal, as shown in FIG. 11. Slots 26 opening upwardly extend over the major portion of the height of sides 22 between strip fingers 27 projecting upwardly from margins 27 to form sockets for reception of folded paper packs disposed in substantially parallel relationship, as described in relation to FIGS. 1 to 7, inclusive.

The rack shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 may be of permanently erected construction by bonding together the contacting upper edge portions 23 of the rack sides 22. In such case, the lower portions of such sides can also be connected rigidly to the longitudinal base strips 21. This type of rack, however, can easily be made collapsible by connecting the lower edges of the rack sides 22 and the base strips 21 by hinges 22' and by supporting the sides 22 in upwardly convergent relationship merely by unsecured abutment of the upper edge portions 23 of the sides with each other.

By swinging one rack side upward about its hinge 22 relative to the base while holding the other side 22 stationary. such other side can then be lowered about its hinge 22' until its end portions rest on the base spreader strips 25, as shown in FIG. 12. The raised rack side can then also be lowered until it is disposed in substantially flat overlapping relationship to the base and the rack side first lowered, as also shown in FIG. 12. This position of the sides of such a rack in such flatfolded condition will faciliate storage of the rack.

In FIG. 13, a paper-holding rack constructed of heavy wire or rods is shown. The rack is composed principally of U-shaped wire or rod elements having horizontal central portions 28 and opposite upright end portions 29 joined to the horizontal portions by bends 30. Such U-shaped wire or rod elements are mounted in parallel spaced upright planes to provide slots 31 between them by the horizontal portions of such elements.

being secured in spaced relationship along the lengths of longitudinal horizontal wires or rods 32. Such U- shaped elements and horizontal elements can be secured together by welding if the U-shaped elements and longitudinal base connecting elements are of iron or iron alloy.

In use, the rack of FIG. 13 can be supported by placing its base rods 32 on a conventional fireplace basket type grate 33, shown in phantom in FIG. 13. In supporting folded paper packs of newspaper in the rack for burning, as described in connection with the rack of FIGS. 1 to 3, it is desirable to leave at least one empty slot between adjacent paper packs.

In the modified rack 34 of FIG. 14, U-shaped loop elements are used instead of the U-shaped linear elements shown in and described in connection with FIG. 13. In this rack, each U-shaped element is an elongated loop having parallel sides connected by bends 38, which loop includes a horizontal portion 35 connected to opposite upright portions 36 by bends 37. The U- shaped loop elements are mounted in spaced relationship along the lengths of the spaced, parallel, longitudinal wires or rods 39 forming the base. Slots 40 are thereby provided between adjacent loop elements for receiving folded paper packs. The size of the bends 38 will determine the degree of spacing between the paper pack holding slots 40.

The rack of FIG. is more suitable to hold shorter paper packs than the racks described above because it has only a single upright slot-forming rack component. Such component is a convoluted member analogous to the sinuous band of the rack shown in FIGS. 1 to 7 inclusive, and could be made of similar band material. In this instance, however, the sinuous member is shown as being of wire or rod type, rather than being a band.

The wire or rod sinuous rack component shown in FIG. 15 includes the parallel, upright, coplanar portions 41. The upper ends of adjacent upright portions are connected by bends 42 and the lower ends of adjacent upright portions are connected by bends 43 to form the sinuous shape of the wire or rod member. Upwardly opening slots 44 are formed between the upper bends 42 to receive flat-folded paper packs, as described in connection with FIGS. 2 and 3. The convoluted rack component can be supported in the upright position shown in FIG. 15 by securing the lower ends of the end upright portions 41 between the ends of the spaced, parallel, horizontal base wires or rods 45. Such base members extend transversely of the length of the rack component.

The base rods 45 of the paper pack holding rack shown in FIG. 15 can be of any suitable length and spaced apart any desired distance, depending upon the length of the sinuous member rack component. Two of such sinuous components could be mounted on the base members 45 in spaced parallel upright relationship, if desired. Also, such spaced members could be made of square rods or flat bands, if desired. In any of such cases, the ends of the sinuous rack component can be secured to the base members by welding if such rack components and the base members are made of iron or iron alloy material.

In FIG. 16, two sinuous paper pack holding rack components generally similar to such component described in connection with FIG. 15 are supported in spaced, parallel upright planes by connecting the corresponding ends of such rack components by transverse base spreader members 46. These spreader members preferably are connected to the end upright portions of the rack components by bends 47.

Each of the U-shaped loop members of the rack shown in FIG. 14, and the entire rack of FIG. 16, can be made from a single length of wire or rod stock, if desired. Alternatively, such elements can be made of two or more lengths of wire or rod stock suitably formed.

In either case, one or more butt joints between wire or rod ends forming the particular member can be conveniently joined by butt welding.

The racks shown in FIGS. 17 and 18 are particularly adapted to hold rolled packs of newspaper rather than folded paper packs. These racks also can be made conveniently from wire or rod stock. The rack of FIG. 17 includes four comer posts 48, the upper ends of which are connected to convoluted rack components 49 by bends 50. Each convoluted rack component includes a row of substantially coplanar and substantially circular loops 51. Each of these loops is of a size desired to constitute a socket for receiving a rolled paper pack of newspaper of convenient size.

The convoluted rack components 49 can be maintained in substantially the same horizontal plane, as shown in FIG. 17, with the loop convolutions of the two components projecting in opposite directions by connecting the lower ends of the posts 48 at corresponding ends of the rack components by transverse spreader base rods 52. In order to increase the rigidity of the rack, the transverse base rods 52 are connected by one or more longitudinal base rods 53, two of such rods being shown in FIG. 17 in parallel relationship.

The paper pack holding rack of FIG. 17 can be set on a conventional basket type of fireplace grate, such as indicated as 33 in FIG. 13, if desired. In that case, the lower ends of rolled paper packs inserted through the loops 51 can be inserted only to the level of the grate so as to provide adequate circulation space for combustion draft beneath the lower ends of the paper packs. Also, the loops 5] of each convoluted component of the rack can be spaced apart a greater or lesser distance, as may be desired, to provide adequate space between the paper packs for circulation of combustion air between them. The lengths of the spreader base rods 52 will also be selected to afford proper spacing between paper packs supported by the loops of the two rack components to afford adequate air circulation.

In the paper pack holding rack of FIG. 18, two convoluted rack components are held in spaced parallel upright planes by upper and lower transverse spreader rods 54 connecting them. The lengths of such spreader rods will be selected so that the convoluted rack components will engage rolled newspaper packs at two desired locations spaced lengthwise of the paper pack. Corner bends 56 connect opposite ends of spreader rods 54 to corresponding ends of convoluted components 55 at opposite sides of the rack.

Each of theconvoluted components of the rack of FIG. 18 is similar to the convoluted components of the rack of FIG. 17, including a plurality .of coplanar loops 57 arranged in a row, except that, in this instance, the loops are disposed in vertical planes rather than in horizontal planes. The two convoluted components in each vertical plane are held in properly spaced relationship by upright posts 58, the upper and lower ends of which are connected respectively to superimposed horizontal transverse spreader rods 54. The rack of FIG. 18 should be supported in a fireplace at a location elevated to some extent above the floor of the fireplace and could be provided with legs or any other suitable support for this purpose which does not interfere with insertion of rolled paper packs horizontally through the spaced, registering loops of the rack components. Such rack could, for example, be placed on the stand 6 shown in FIG. 1.

I claim:

1. A paper pack holding rack for a fireplace, comprising two cooperating substantially planar rack components, each rack component including a series of substantially parallel elongated elements arranged in a row and defining a row of elongated slots opening at one edge of said rack component for receiving individual flat packs of paper, respectively, each rack component having abutments located between said one. rack edge and the opposite rack edge, and supporting means engageable by said rack component abutments for supporting said rack components in spaced relationship with the lengths of said rack components extending generally parallel and with said slots of said two rack components being substantially in mutual unobstructed registration for holding a plurality of flat paper packs in substantially parallel relationship in upright planes.

2. The rack defined in claim 1, in which each rack component includes a convoluted member forming the elongated elements of the paper pack holding slots.

3. The rack defined in claim 2,1in which each convoluted member is sinuous including adjacent folds, the adjacent sides of adjacent folds defining the elongated elements.

4. The rack defined in claim 1, in which the supporting means is engaged by the abutments of the two rack components and by portions of the rack components spaced from such abutments for holding such two rack LII components inclined in upwardly flaring relationship to each other.

5. The rack defined in claim 1, in which the supporting means is engaged by the abutments of the two rack components and by portions of the rack components spaced from such abutments for holding such rack components in substantially horizontal coplanar relationship.

6. The rack defined in claim 1, the supporting means including a stand for supporting the racrteasr afints including a plurality of parallel bars having their lengths extending perpendicular to the lengths of the rack components and straddled by the rack components when their abutments are in engagement with said bars.

7. The rack defined in claim 1, in which the supporting means is engaged by the abutments of the two rack components for holding such two rack components substantially in parallel upright planes with substantial portions of the rack components depending below the supporting means.

8. The rack defined in claim 1, in which the spacing between adjacent slots of each rack component is approximately equal to the spacing between the elong ted ien bers forming a slot. N

9. The rack defined in claim 1, in which the supporting means includes a stand having a longitudinal bar disposed with its length extending parallel to the lengths of the rack components and a plurality of lcrossbars connected to saidlongitudinal bar and having their lengths extending transversely of the lengths component abutments.

10'. The rack defined in cTaim 9, in which the crossbars of the stand have upwardly opening notches in which the rack component abutments are engageable.

11. A paper pack holding rack for a fireplace comprising two cooperating substantially planar rack components, each rack component including a series of substantially parallel elongated elements arranged in a row and defining a row of elongated slots opening at one edge of said rack component for receiving individual flat packs of paper, respectively, each rack component having abutments located between adjacent slots and between said one rack edge and the opposite rack edge but being disposed closer to said opposite rack edge than to said one rack edge, and a stand having a longitudinal bar and a plurality of parallel crossbars connected to said longitudinal bar, said rack component abutments being engageable with said crossbars for supporting said rack components with their lengths extending parallel to said longitudinal bar and transversely of said crossbars and with a substantial portion of said rack components depending below said crossbars.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4131108 *Jan 17, 1977Dec 26, 1978Bauder Edward MAndiron for supporting logs
US4305375 *Jan 9, 1980Dec 15, 1981George Wilfred RGrate for burning newspapers
US4360001 *Jun 5, 1981Nov 23, 1982Thompson E ArthurFire array and apparatus
US4411251 *Jul 22, 1981Oct 25, 1983James PartonFireplace insert
US4463747 *Mar 8, 1982Aug 7, 1984James PartonFireplace insert
US4526159 *Jun 5, 1984Jul 2, 1985Vroome Ray LFireplace grate
US4623324 *Oct 26, 1984Nov 18, 1986A. Zulkowitz AssociatesMethod and apparatus for making fuel elements from newspaper sheets or the like
US4773387 *Nov 17, 1986Sep 27, 1988A. Zulkowitz AssociatesMethod and apparatus for making fuel elements from newspaper sheets or the like
US4829975 *Jan 13, 1988May 16, 1989Pyromid, Inc.Cooking unit with improved fire grate
US4836185 *May 16, 1988Jun 6, 1989Kudija David AFireplace newspaper holder
US4867410 *Dec 28, 1987Sep 19, 1989Donald JurgichDevice for holding utensils
US4896650 *Jan 9, 1989Jan 30, 1990Pyromid, Inc.Cooking unit with improved fire grate
US6270721 *Oct 10, 1996Aug 7, 2001Christopher W. FordSeparator device for article sterilization
US6431372 *Jun 25, 1998Aug 13, 2002Ngk Insulators, Ltd.Support unit and assemblied rack for loading long objects
US6571964 *Mar 28, 2001Jun 3, 2003International Business Machines CorporationDisk drive supports comprising rods, plates, rails and titanium wires in zig-zag layouts to provide strength, shock and crack resistance
US6789684 *Sep 12, 2002Sep 14, 2004Transilwrap Company, Inc.Storage container for cards and file folders
US6871644 *May 1, 2003Mar 29, 2005Ashok ChandariaFirelog grate
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/541, 211/49.1, D23/400, 211/70.1, 211/60.1, 211/120
International ClassificationF24B1/00, F24B1/193
Cooperative ClassificationF24B1/193
European ClassificationF24B1/193