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Publication numberUS3841199 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1974
Filing dateMar 13, 1973
Priority dateMar 13, 1973
Publication numberUS 3841199 A, US 3841199A, US-A-3841199, US3841199 A, US3841199A
InventorsBrown R, Jepson J, Lyon H
Original AssigneeAcushnet Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf ball dimple milling apparatus
US 3841199 A
Abstract
A machine for the production of golf ball dimples is disclosed. The dimples can be produced on golf ball hobs, which are used for making golf ball molds, on the molds themselves or even on individual golf balls.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent J epson et al.

1451 Oct. 15, 1974 GOLF BALL DIMPLE MILLING APPARATUS Inventors: John W. J'epson, Marion, Mass;

Herbert WL Lyon, Escondido, Califi; Robert A. Brown, Marion, Mass.

Acushnet Company, New Bedford,

Assignee:

Mass. 1

Filed: Mar. 13, 1973 Appl. No.: 340,710

US. Cl 90/13 C, 90/14, 90/56 R, 90/58 C, 408/3, 408/71 Int. Cl. B231: 1/02, B230 1/16 Field of Search 408/3, 71, 89, 90; 90/13 C, 56 R, 58 B, 58 C, 14; 51/218 A,

1 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS I 1.414970 5/1922 M15011 90/58 B 3.175.190 3/1965 Gasser 90/13 0 3,232,141 2/1966 Swanson ct u 408/90 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATIONS 1,085.010 7/19'60- Germany 408/89 Primary ExaminerGil Weidenfeld I Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Eyre, Mann & Lucas 5 7 ABSTRACT A machine for the production of golf ball dimples is disclosed. The dimples can be produced on golf ball hobs, which are used for making golf ball molds, on the molds themselves or even on individual golf balls.

16 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures llmgml' 38v 36 V I MEMEQBBI I SIBM SHEET 18? 2 1 GOLF BALL DIMPLE MILLING APPARATUS The present invention relates to a machine for producing dimples on various golf ball structures. The invention has to do not only with the production of the golf ball dimples but more importantly with their spatial relationships;

Dimples on golf balls are well known in the art since they produce desired aerodynamic properties which increase the flight of the ball. Dimples on golf balls may be characterized as depressions in the surface of the golf ball. Dimples are normally impressed into the golf ball by a golf ball mold which has protrusions on it surface which in turn make depressions in the finished golf ball. Golf ball molds are sometimes made directly and in other cases they are made from hobs as is disclosed in a copending aplication Ser. No. 326,900 dated Jan. 26, 1973. A hob,'in golf ball terms, has essentially the same configuration as the golf balland is used to make golf ball molds. It will thus be'understood that dimples in finished golf balls can be made either on the balls themselves, from golf ball mold'swhichare produced directly, or from golf ball hobs which are used to make the golf ball molds.

Heretofore, whether golf ball molds or golf ball hobs were being produced, it was necessary to machine each 2 able Table 14 which is rotatably supported by support 16. Movement of the rotating table 142is effected by dimple by hand. This is a time consuming, expensive,

motor 18 which operates through a worm-gear ,(not shown) in known manner. Support 16 is fixedly mounted to horizontal rotating table 20. Preferably the support 16 is mounted so that the axis of rotation of the vertical table 14 intersects the axis of rotation of the horizontal rotating table 20. Rotating table 20 is mounted on support 22 which inturn is mounted to base 23. Rotation of table 20 is effected by motor 24 through aworm gear (not shown). Motors .18 and 24 are connected to a control console 26 by cables 28 and 30. respectively. The control console 26 shown is a perforated tape console having a feed wheel 32,'a-take-up wheel 34 and tape 36 which feeds through upper and lower tape heads 38 and 40. Controls 42 are provided for adjusting speed, synchronization, and the like. The control console is used to automatically position rotating tables 20 and, 14 formaking a dimple in a specific position'on the golf ball. The tables are adjusted automatically until the desir ed position is obtained and then this position is held during the cutting of the dimple. After-one dimple has beencut, at least one of the rotating tables is lautomatically moved to adjust the work piece ,10 to a new position for cutting a new dimple.

The movement of the rotating tables 14 and 20 is done automatically by control of motor 18 and motor 24 by the control consolePrforating the tape to properly control the motors is'well within the skill of the art. While best results have been obtainedwith a perforated tape control console because of 'its great flexibility,

is intended to include both protrusions for making dimples (as in a mold) and depressions for making the dimples (as in a hob or actual ball).

In accordance with the present invention, the spacing of the dimples one from another is accomplished by automatic control means. As will hereinafter more fully be described, this automatic control means may be'perforated tpaes, magnetic tapes, mechanical linkages, electronic circuitry, etc. I v

Another aspect of the present invention which is especially useful for the production of hobs or actual golf balls is the configuration of the cutting tool whereinthe cutting tool shapes not only the dimple but also the surrounding fret areawhich is the surface of the golf ball between dimples. By shaping the tool to cut both the dimple and the fret area, extremely accurate hobs and golf balls and even molds can beproduced.

These and other aspects of the present inventionare exemplified by the drawings in which: n a

FIG. 1 is one embodiment of a machine for carrying out the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of the embodiment of FIG. 1 with" the horizontal'tablejn" a different'position;

FIG. 3 is the preferred shape of the cutting tool for cutting a ball or hob; 7

FIG. 4 is the preferred shapeof the cutting tool for cutting a golf ball mold; and

FIG. 5 'is a cutting tool shaped to produce dimples only.

Referring to FIG.] there is shown a work piece 10 in a chuck 12. The chuck is mounted to a vertical rotatother control means may be used. Where it is desired to always effect the same dimple pattern on the work piece, the control means can be an electronic circuit which will automatically duplicate the pattern for each work piece. Similarly, the control means could be a magnetic tape or a mechanical linkage, etc.

Cutting of the dimple into the work piece is done by cutter 44. The cutter 44 is mounted in a chuck 46 which in turn is connected to an extension 48 of motor 50. In the embodiment shown, the armature (not shown) of motor 50 rotates and directly drives cutter 44. Motor 50 is mo'u'ntedon a support 52 and is movable between stops .54 and 56 by means of motor 53 through a lead screw- (not shown). Preferably motor 50 is mounted on its slide support 52 so that an extension of the axis of rotationv of the armature of the motor 50 and thus the axis of rotation of the cutting tool 44 intersects the common intersection of the axes of rotation of the rotating tables 14 and 20. ln'operatio'n, the point of intersection of the three axes is preferably :the center of the usually spherical golf ball structureLStop56 is movably mounted on extension '58 of support 52 and controls the depth towhich the cutter 44 enters the work piece 10. Stop 56 controls the depth to which'the cutting tool penetrates and can thus be used to control the size of the dimple. Where the fret areais cut at the same time as thedimple, stop 56 can be. regulated to control the diameter of the finished 'product, e.g., to make the smaller British ball of l.62'inch diameter.

Motor 50 may be connected to the control console. 26 by cable 62 as shown or it canbe independentlyop erated either by another control means or manually ,if desired. It will be understood, however, that in the preferred embodiment motors 18, 24, 50 and SS-are all automatically controlled by the control console 26.

In FIG. 2 there is shown a top view of the apparatus of FIG. 1 in which horizontal table 20 has been rotated so that the work piece is in a different position with respect to cutter 44. With the work piece in this position, a dimple can be cut in the work piece 10 which is spaced from the dimple cut with the apparatus shown in the position in FIG. 1. Horizontal table is provided with grooves 64 for fixedly positioning support 16. Grooves 64 are of an inverted T-shape as is more clearly shown in FIG. 1 and thus accommodate boltsin known manner. In FIG. 2 motor 50 has been advanced along tracks 65 in support 52 by means of motor 53 so that the cutter 44 is in contact with the surface of the work piece 10. Motor 50 is about to come into contact with stop piece 56 which is mounted in track 66.

In operation rotating table 14 and rotating table 20 are automatically moved by control console 26 to align work piece 10 with cutter 44 so that a dimple can be cut which will be in the proper position on the finished structure. Whether the finished structure is an actual golf ball, a golf ball mold or a golf ball hob, the rotating tables position the work piece so that the surface of the finished structure will be normal to the movement of the cutter 44. Since a golf ball is always round, it can be readily appreciated by one skilled in the art that this positioning of the work piece can be accomplished with proper control of the vertical and horizontal tables. It is important to note that the positioning of the work piece is to make the movement of the cutter normal to the surface of the finished structure and not necessarily normal to the surface of the work piece. In the case where cutter 44 produces the finished-fret surface as well as dimple surface, as shown in FIG. 3 it will be understood that the work piece can be square in which case the cutter would move into the work piece at an angle to the surface of the work piece when it was forming some of the dimples. The position of the cutter with respect to the surface of the work piece is not essential and it is only essential that the movement of the cutter be along a line which is normal to the surface of the finished structure. When the term surface of the finished structure" is used it is intended to mean the surface of the structure disregarding any dimples which are cut. Since a golf ball is round, this surface will always be a section of a sphere having a radius equal to about one half of the diameter of the finished golf ball to be formed. The radius will not necessarily be exactly one half of the diameter of the finished golf ball because of contraction of the golf ball after it leaves the mold, painting of the golf ball or other minor variations.

In FIG. 3 is shown a cross section of the preferred cutting tool of the'present invention. The cutting tool comprises a shaft 68, a dimple forming cutter 70 and a fret forming cutter-72. When'thecutter of FIG. 3 is used in the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and'2 to cut a golf ball or a golf ball hob, it can be used to cut both the dimple and the fret area. This is highly advantageous since it permits precise control of the depth of the dimple with respect to the surface of the finishedstructure.

In FIG. 4 is shown in cross section the preferred shape of the cutting tool for cutting a golf ball mold. As previously explained, a golf ball mold has the opposite shape from that of the finished golf ball. The cutter comprises shaft 74, dimple forming cutter 76 and fret forming cutter 78. Since the dimple cutter 76 has an indentation in the cutter this will cut a protrusion on the golf ball mold blank 80.-The mold balnk is a solid work piece and what will be the finished surface of the golf ball structure is shown by dotted line 82. On the concave part of this surface 82 will be the dimple protrusions formed by dimple cutter 76. It will be understood that in the machine of FIGS. 1 and 2 work piece 80 will be mounted in the same position as work piece 10.

In FIG. 5 is shown a cutting tool for cutting dimples only. The dimples are out onto a surface which is already the shape of a golf ball; in the case of an actual ball or a golf ball hob, this would be a spherical shape;

in the case of a golf ball mold, it would be the shape of an inverted sphere. The cutting tool comprises a shaft 88 and a dimple forming cutter 90.

One skilled in the art will readily appreciate that many changes can be made to the structure of the present invention while still remaining within the purview of the invention. Motor 50 is not an essential part of the invention and could be a heater element instead of a motor. In this case cutter 44 would be replaced by a non-rotating formed tool which could simply be heated above the melt temperature of the work piece 10 and thus cut into the surface of the work piece 10 by thermal action. In view of the many changes which can be made. it will be understood that the claims are intended to cover all changes and modifications of the preferred embodiments of the invention, herein 'chosen for the purpose of'illustration, which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a machine for producing a plurality of dimples for a golf ball on the surface of a work piece comprisa. firstmeans for removing selected portions of material from the work piece;

b. second means for effecting relative movement between the first means and the work piece to establish contact between the two to form a dimple;

c. third means comprising two relatively rotating tables whose axes of rotation intersect, one of said tables being supported on the other of said tables and being radially spaced from the rotary axis thereof;

(I. work support means at least partially located between the point of intersection of the axes of rotation of the rotary tables and said one of said tables and mounted on said last mentioned table and being capable of supporting a work piece having a spherical surface which is equally spaced from said point of intersection; l i

. said first means having a longitudinal axis intersecting said point of intersection;

f. wherein said third means can adjust the relationship between the firstrrieans and the work piece so that in forming each of said dimples the relative movement of the first means and the work piece will be along a line substantially normal with respect to a spherical surface formed on the work piece; and

g. automatic control means for controlling at least said third means.

2. The machine of claim 1 wherein the first means comprises a cutter.

3. The machine of claim 2 wherein the first means is effective to form both the dimple and the fret area surrounding the dimple.

4. The machine of claim 1 wherein the first, second and third means are all controlled by the automatic control means.

5. The machine of claim 1 wherein the automatic control means comprises a perforated tape console.

6. In a machine for producing a golf ball hob having a plurality of dimples on the surface thereof from a hob blank comprising:

a. first means for removing selected portions of mate rial from the hob blank;

b. second means for effecting relative movement between the first means and the hob blank to establish contact between the two to form a dimple;

c. third means comprising two relatively rotating tables whose axes of rotation intersect, one of said tables being supported on the other of said tables and being radially spaced from the rotary axis thereof;

d. hob blank support means at least partially located between the point of intersection of the axes of rotation of the rotary tables and said one of said tables and mounted on said last mentioned table and being capable of supporting a hob blank having a spherical surface which is equally spaced from said point of intersection;

e. said first means having a longitudinal axis intersecting said point of intersection;

f. wherein said third means can adjust the relationship between the first means and the hob blankso that in forming each of said dimples the relative movement of the first means and the hob blank will be along a line substantially normal with respect to a spherical surface formed onthe hob blank; and

g. automatic control means for controlling at least said third means.

7. The machine of claim 6 wherein the first means comprises a cutter.

8. The machine of claim 7 wherein the first means is effective to form both thedimple and the fret area surrounding the dimple.

9. The machine of claim 6 wherein the first, second and third means are all controlled by the automatic control means.

10. The machine of claim 6 wherein the automatic control means comprises a perforated tape console.'

11. In a machine for producing a golf ball mold having a plurality of dimples on the surface thereof from a mold blank comprising:

a. first means for removing selected portions of material from the mold blank;

b. second means for effecting relative movement between the first means and the mold blank;

c. third means comprising two relatively rotating ta-' bles whose axes of rotation intersect, one of said tables being supported on the other of said tables and being radially spaced from the rotary axis thereof;

d. mold blank support means at least partially located between the point of intersection of the axes of rotation of the rotary tables and said one of said tables and mounted on said last mentioned table and being capable of supporting a mold balnk having a spherical surface which is equally spaced from said point of intersection; I

e. said first means having a longitudinal axis intersecting said point of intersection;

f. wherein said third means can adjust the relationship between the first means and-the mold blank so that in forming each of said dimples the relative movement of the first means and the mold blank will be along a line substantially normal ;with re spect to a spherical surface formed on the mold blank; and g. automatic control means for controlling at least said third means. 12. The machine of claim 11 wherein the first means comprises a cutter.

13. The machine of claim 12 wherein the first means is effective to form both the dimple and the fret area surrounding the dimple.

14. The machine of claim 11 wherein the first, second and third means are all controlled by the automatic control means.

15. The machine of claim 11 wherein the automatic control means comprises aperforated tape console.

16. In a machine for producing a plurality of dimples for a golf ball on the surface of a work piece comprisa. first means for removing selected portions of material from the work piece;

b. second means for effecting relative movement between the first means and the work pieceto establish contact between the two to form a dimple;

c. third means comprising two relatively rotating tableswhose axes of rotation intersect, one of said tables being supported on the other of said tables and being radially spaced from the rotary axis thereof;

d. work support means at least partially located between the point of intersection of the axes of rotation of the rotary tables and said one of said tables and mounted on said last mentioned table and being capable of supporting a work piece having a spherical surface which is equally spaced from said point of intersection;

6.. said first means having a longitudinal axis intersecting said point of intersection; and. v

f. wherein said third means can adjust-the relationship between the first means' and thework piece so that in forming each of said dimples the relative movement of the first means and the workpiece will be along a line substantially normal with respectto a spherical surface formed on the work piece.

Patent Citations
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*DE1085010A Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4593444 *Dec 20, 1983Jun 10, 1986Kavthekar Keshav SMachine for manufacturing universal joints
US4625377 *Aug 8, 1985Dec 2, 1986Kavthekar Keshav SMethod for manufacturing universal joints
US4850764 *Jun 10, 1987Jul 25, 1989Chiron-Werke Gmbh & Co. KgMachine tool
US4954022 *Jun 16, 1989Sep 4, 1990Underwood Mold Co., Inc.Method for machining multiple cuts in a workpiece to a uniform depth
US5022802 *Aug 25, 1989Jun 11, 1991Kabushiki Kaisha ShinkoseisakushoSystem for generating a tooth profile used in a differential speed reduction apparatus
US5788435 *Apr 28, 1995Aug 4, 1998Mccarthy; John F.Automated diamond cutter apparatus
US5941151 *Oct 4, 1995Aug 24, 1999Acuson, CorporationMethod and apparatus for determining a workpiece's surface position
US5980232 *Sep 29, 1997Nov 9, 1999Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd.Golf ball mold, master model and method of making the mold and model
US6390740 *Oct 3, 2000May 21, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Non-circular dimples formed via an orbital pantograph cutter
US7891917 *Mar 29, 2007Feb 22, 2011Gregory NulmanAutomatic brake shoe drilling machine and method
US7992851 *Aug 1, 2007Aug 9, 2011Acushnet CompanyDevice for automatic indexing of a golf ball
US20140007748 *Jul 6, 2012Jan 9, 2014Caterpillar, Inc.Surface Dimpling on Rotating Work Piece Using Rotation Cutting Tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification409/80, 409/165, 409/189, 408/3, 408/71
International ClassificationB23Q1/54, B23Q1/48, B23Q1/00, B23C3/16
Cooperative ClassificationB23Q1/4828, B23C3/16, B23Q1/0009, B23Q1/5406
European ClassificationB23Q1/00B, B23Q1/48C, B23C3/16, B23Q1/54A