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Publication numberUS3841321 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1974
Filing dateJun 22, 1973
Priority dateJun 22, 1973
Also published asCA1032045A1, DE2429940A1, DE2429940B2
Publication numberUS 3841321 A, US 3841321A, US-A-3841321, US3841321 A, US3841321A
InventorsAlbach R, Carlson R, Mathers K
Original AssigneeNiagara Therapy Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hand manipulated body massager
US 3841321 A
Abstract
A therapeutic massage unit having an enclosed casing for massage application to the body which presents a container forming cylindrical body wall and hemispherical end wall which is vibrated by a gyratory motor pocketed therein. The other end of the container part is closed by a cover part which presents a cylindrical rim which is attachably secured to the container part and a tapered nose extension to which facial or scalp massage attachments may be removably applied. The speed of motor rotation and character of the massage vibrations are controlled by adjustable elements accessibly mounted on the cover part and which manipulate solid state circuitry compactly mounted within the cover part. A cooling air propelling and circulation arrangement is incorporated in the unit whereby the motor control circuitry and motor parts subject to heating during operation are washed in a stream of cooling air and maintained in the desired temperature range.
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United States Patent [1 1 Albach et al.

451 Oct. 15, 1974 HAND MANIPULATED BODY MASSAGER [75] Inventors: Robert W. Albach, Dunkirk;

7 Kenneth R. Mathers, Brocton;

Reuben T. Carlson, Jamestown, all of NY.

[73] Assignee: Niagara Therapy Manufacturing Corporation, Village of Brocton, NY.

[22] Filed: June 22, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 372,609

[52] US. Cl. 128/36 [51] Int. Cl A61h U110 [58] Field of Search 128/24.2, 32-36, 128/41 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,674,994 4/1954 Murphy 128/36 3,096,757 7/1963 Berard 128/36 3,115,139 12/1963 Schneider 128/36 UX 3,363,623 l/l968 Atwell 128/36 Primary Examiner-Lawrence W. Trapp Attorney, Agent, or FirmR'euben T. Carlson 57 ABSTRACT A therapeutic massage unit having an enclosed casing for massage application to the body which presents a container forming cylindrical body wall and hemispherical end wall which is vibrated by a gyratory motor pocketed therein. The other end of the container part is closed by a cover part which presents a cylindrical rim which is attachably secured to the container part and a tapered nose extension to which facial or scalp massage attachments may be removably applied. The speed of motor rotation and character of the massage vibrations are controlled by adjustable elements accessibly mounted on the cover part and which manipulate solid state circuitry compactly mounted within the cover part. A cooling air propelling and circulation arrangement is incorporated in the unit whereby the motor control circuitry and motor parts subject to heating during operation are washed in a stream of cooling air and maintained in the desired temperature range.

12 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEUHBT 1 51m 3,841,321

SHEEI 20F 2 HAND MANIPULATED BODY MASSAGER This invention embraces certain important advances and improvements over the hand held body massager shown in Murphy U.S. Pat. No. 2,674,994. The Murphy Patent shows a flip switch 36 for starting and stopping the motor, but no means are provided for adjusting or regulating the motor speed. In a later development, the power cord leading to the gyratory motor in the body massager was equipped with a speed control device such as a rheostat box or speed control meter shown in the upper part of FIG. 1 of Eiden U.S. Pat. No. 3,019,785. While hand applied body massagers, such as shown in this Murphy Patent, and whose power cord was equipped with a motor speed control rheostat box, have been and continue to be in extensive use, experience has indicated the need for important improvements.

For example, a person who is seated in a chair or is lying in a bed, often finds it very cumbersome to manipulate the speed of the gyratory motor by means of a rheostat box spaced from the massage instrument. Furthermore, no means have heretofor been provided for calibrating and trimming motor speeds so that all massagers have uniform preformance characteristics, particularly at low speeds which are often preferred in therapeutic treatments. Also massagers of the type shown in the Murphy Patent sometimes become excessively heated when run for a period of time so that the massaging surfaces of the casing cannot be comfortably applied to the human body. Such overheating often results from a lack of direction of the cooling air into and through the unit, and the propulsion of an air stream through the motor unit and out of the casing in sufficient volume and at sufficient velocity to remove the heat as formed.

An object of this invention is to provide an improved hand manipulated body massager whose vibration producing gyratory motor is entirely housed within and supported by the cylindrical body wall of the container part, and whose cover part contains electronic speed control circuitry whose solid state components can be compactly assembled and mounted in the cover part prior to attachment of the cover part to the container part.

An object of this invention is to provide a body massager sized for convenient hand manipulation and whose vibration producing gyratory motor is entirely housed within and supported by the cylindrical wall of the container part, means for mounting in compact arrangement within said cover part the electronic circuitry for controlling the operation of said gyratory motor, and means for detachably connecting the leads from the motor and power supply in series with the leads associated with the speed control circuitry.

A further object of this invention is to provide a cover part for closing the tubular massage container, said cover part presenting a tubular flange which emerges into a circular shoulder and terminates in a tubular nose extension, a bracing member seating against said shoulder and which supports and electronic motor speed control assembly, and means for connecting said electronic assembly and bracing member to the outer end of said nose extension.

A further object of this invention is to provide a hand manipulated body massager which includes a container part housing a vibration producing motor, a closure part containing motor speed control circuitry, air circulation passages in said cover part and container part for directing a stream of air through and around the components of said control circuitry and through said gyratory motor, and means for propelling the directed air stream at sufficient velocity to thereby remove undesired heat and maintain the surfaces of the massager at acceptable massaging temperature.

For a better understanding of the present invention and the objectives thereof, reference is made to the accompanying drawings and the following description.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the hand manipulated body massager made in accordance with this invention and a diagrammatic outline of a massaging attachment applied to the nose extension of the massager.

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal section of the body massager shown in FIG. 1 and which shows the gyratory motor and suction fan as housed within the container part of the massager; this view also shows the cover part as detachably secured to the container part and the electronic circuitry as mounted within the cover part and by means of which the'speed of rotation of the gyratory motor and the vibrating characteristics of the instrument may be controlled by an adjusting knob conveniently accessible at the terminal end of the nose section.

FIG. 3 is a transverse section of the massager as the same would appear when viewed in the direction of the arrows along line 33 on FIG. 2, this view illustrating further details of the suction fan and the warm air discharge ports in the surrounding casing.

FIG. 4 is another transverse section of the massager as it would appear when viewed in the direction of the arrows along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2, this view showing the outside face of the adjacent spider end wall of the motor with certain parts broken away to reveal the open passages between the motor stator and rotor through which cooling air is drawn longitudinally through the motor at considerable velocity and volume by the suction fan for radial ejection through the adjacent warm air ports in the massage casing.

FIG. 5 is another transverse section of the massager as the same would appear when viewed in the direction of the arrows along line 5--5 of FIG. 2, this view showing the open character of the adjacent spider end wall and the open passages between the motor stator and rotor at the commutator end of the motor.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a collection of solid state components which are joined by printed circuitry to provide an electronic circuit for controlling the speed of the gyratory motor, this view showing the compact arrangement of the solid state components on a circular circuit board of limited diameter which can be mounted and supported within the cover part with ample circulation of cooling air around all components.

FIG. 7 is an elevational view of the electronic components which form the motor speed control circuitry mounted on the circuit board and as the same would appear when viewed along line 7-7 of FIG. 6, only the lower end portion of the potentiometer manipulating stern being here shown.

FIG 8. is another elevational view of the electronic components which form the motor speed control circuitry and as the same would appear when viewed in the direction of the arrows along line 8-8 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram of the motor speed control circuitry which may be conveniently used.

FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of the various components for mounting and securing the speed control circuitry within the cover part of the massager.

FIG. 1 1 is a fragmentary longitudinal section showing a modified arrangement for detachably securing the cover part containing the motor speed control circuitry to the open end of the container part in which the gyratory motor is housed.

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary view of the modified construction shown in FIG. 11 and in which the threaded lock ring which secures the cover part to the adjacent open end of the container part is partially backed off to expose a hole into which a tool can be inserted and access thereby attained to the motor speed trimmer of the control circuitry for the purpose of adjusting the trimmer to the lower limit of rotative speed of the gyratory motor.

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary view of the modified construction shown in FIGS. 11 and 12 as the same would appear when the lock ring is in closed position.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the drawing figures and this specification.

The therapeutic massage instrument of this invention presents a relatively rigid body massaging shell as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 having an overall length of approximately eight to ten inches and a diameter of two and one half to two and three fourths inches, and is thus adapted to be conveniently held in the hand and stroked over selected areas of the persons body. The body massaging shell is formed in two separable parts; a container forming part A and a cover part B. The container part A presents a cylindrical body wall 1 closed at one end by a hemispherical shaped end wall 2 and is designed to completely house a vibration producing motor M inserted into the container part A through the open end thereof. The container part A may be formed by a deep drawing operation from a blank of metal such as aluminum, or may be shaped or formed from a strong, tough and lasting plastic material.

The cover part B as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 10, may also be formed by deep drawing a metal blank or by drawing, forming, or molding a suitable plastic compound and asforrned presents a cylindrical flange 5 whose outer surface forms a planular continuation of the outer surface of the cylindrical body wall 1 of the container part. The cylindrical flnage portion 5 may terminate in a depressed lip portion 5 as shown in FIGS. 2 and over which the free terminal edge of the container body wall 1 may overlap. The cylindrical flange portion 5 of the cover part merges into a rounded shoulder portion 6 whose base forms an outwardly flared end wall portion 6 which merges into a tapered tubular nose extension 7 ending in a square cut end 7 for purpose hereafter described.

Electronic motor control circuitry is compactly arranged and supported by a cup member C as shown in FIGS. 2 and 10 which may be molded from a plastic material and which presents a relatively thick and stiff bottom wall 10 joined to a cylindrical body wall 11 which together define a bottom rim 1] which snugly seats against the inside face of the rounded shoulder portion 6. The cylindrical body wall 11 of the mounting cup C may overlap the depressed lip portion 5' of the cylindrical cover flange 5, and three equally spaced lock nuts 12 may be telescoped over the perimeter thereof as shown in FIGS. 2 and 10. Companion flatheaded screws 12' may each extend through aligned holes formed in the terminal edge in the container body wall 1, the depressed rim portion 5' of the cover part and wall 11 of the mounting cup C and secured in position by the lock nut 12.

The hemispherical shaped end wall 2 and cylindrical body wall 1 as well as a portion of the cylindrical flange 5 of the cover part provide exterior surfaces for massage application to the human body. If desired a blanket or sleeve 9 of soft fabric or rubber may be applied around a major part of the body wall 1 of the container part and the cylindrical flange 5 of the cover part for massage application to the body and covers the jointure therebetween. The nose extension 7 provides support for various massage attachments such as rubber facial or scalp massager pads presenting flexible massage prongs 101 and equipped with a ring portion 102 designed to be removably telescoped into massage position over the free end of the nose extension 7.

For the most effective massage treatment, the outer body contacting surfaces of the container part A and cover part B should be vibrated with an elliptical motion and along all three axis of the ellipse. The cycle of vibrations should also be adjustable over a wide range to obtain various desired therapeutic effects, and may range from 1,200 cycles per minute to over 6,000 cycles per minute. For many treatments the lower scale cycle of vibration in the range of 1,500 cycles per minute is often desired since at this speed the massage treatment has a soothing effect on many persons. The wide range of cyclic vibrations which should be achieved requires a vibration producing motor of particular structural characteristics. It is additionally desirable that the body contacting surfaces of the massage casing be comfortably warmed to slightly above room temperature but not overheated. While most vibration producing motors become heated when used for a period of time, this invention embraces a cooling arrangement whereby cooling air is forcibly drawn through and around the components of the electronic speed control circuit and then through the gyratory motor in such volume and at such velocity that the warmed air is drawn off and expelled from the casing before it has become heated to an undesired temperature.

The preferred form of motor M is a fractional horsepower open ended alternating current motor designed to permit a free flow of cooling air between the stator and rotor. The stator presents an outer stator core 15 of generally tubular form and a pair of inner stator core sections 16 together presenting spaced arcuate shaped inner surfaces between which the squirrel cage rotor 18 rotates. The rotor is supported by a rotor shaft 19 whose ends extend into sturdy hub portions 20a and 20b at opposite ends of the motor. Each hub portion 20a and 20b contains a self-lubricating bearing sleeve 21 in which the ends of the shaft 19 are joumalled, and each bearing sleeve 21 is supported by a resilient sleeve mounting 22 which permits the opposite ends of the shaft 19 to gyrate during rotation when one end of the shaft is unbalanced by an off-center counterweight.

The hub portion 20a at one end of the motor is connected to a motor housing ring frame 23a by four equally spaced radial spokes 24 with ample space between the spokes for the inflow of cooling air between the rotor 18 and the inner stator core sections 16. Two of the diametrically opposite radial spokes 24 each contain an adjustable plunger 25 which supports a commutator bmsh 25 at the end thereof, and which rides on the cylindrical surface of a commutator 26 fixed to the rotor shaft 19. The hub portion 20b at the other end of the rotor is similarly supported by four radially extending spokes 27 whose upper ends are joined by a sturdy motor housing ring frame 23b. Thus cooling air forced at a considerably velocity between the surface of the rotor 18 considerable the adjacent surfaces of the inner core sections 16 escapes from the motor through the open spaces provided between the radial spokes 27. The motor housing ring frame 23b is provided with a tubular housing extension 28 whose free end interlocks with the opposite ring frame 23a, and covers the motor body. The outer stator core and the inner stator core sections 16 joined thereto are supported by a pair of clamp bolts 28' which extend between and connect the housing ring frames 23a and 23b in assembled relationship, as indicated in FIGS. 2 and 4.

A stator winding 17 as shown in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5 is wound between the outer stator core 15 and each of the inner stator core sections 16. The end portion 30a of one of the stator windings 17 extends outside of the motor and terminates in a separable connecter 34', and the other end portion 300 of this winding is connected to one of the two commutator brushes 25' as shown in FIGS. 2 and 5. The companion winding 17 has one of its leads 30b extending outside of the motor and terminates in a connector 37 and its other lead 300 is connected to the other commutator brush 25 of the motor.

A suction fan F of special design is provided to draw a high quantity of cooling air at high velocity around speed control circuitry contained in the cover part B and through the gyratory motor for lateral expulsion from a row of ports 3a and 3b in the casing A. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the fan F has a total of 10 blades 31 secured to a hub 30 fixed to the projecting end 19 of the motor shaft 19. The blades 31 of the fan have an inclination of approximately 45 and are sized and shaped to draw a large volume of cooling air at substantial velocity through the motor and particularly through the space between the inner stator core sections 16 and the rotor 18 where heat is most likely to develop. Thus the volume of air moving horizontally through the operating motor travels at such a velocity under the influence of the suction fan that the traveling air does not have an opportunity to become heated to more than slightly above room temperature, and the fan blades 31 are so shaped as to eject the warmed air through the two rows 3a and 3b of air outlet holes formed in the casing A adjacent the outer ends of the fan blades.

The motor M and suction fan F assembly are supported by a pair of resilient rubber bands 29 which may be adhesively bonded to the outer surface of the ring frames 23a and 23b of the motor. The assembly is then inserted through the open end of the container part A with the entire motor housed therein and with only the leads 30a and 30b from the paired motor windings 17 accessible at the open end of the container part for subsequent wiring connections.

A counterweight bolt 32 is secured to the hub portion 30 of the fan and its bolt head 32' supports counterweights 33. The counterweight bolt 32 and its counterweight load 33 causes the rotor shaft 19 to gyrate during rotation and the gyratory action thus produced is transmitted through the motor body, rubber bands 29 and to the container part A and cover part B of the instrument for body massage application.

The assembly of a series of solid state components in an operating circuit for controlling the speed of rotation of an alternating current motor or a direct current motor is well developed in the art. FIG. 9, for example, illustrates a circuit diagram for controlling the speed of an alternating current motor and which is connected in series between one of the input leads of the power supply and a lead to one of the stator windings of the motor. The principle solid state components forming the alternating current motor speed control circuit is a speed control potentiometer 41, a triac 43, a capacitor 44 connected to the gate of the triac, a diac 49, a second capacitor 45, three line connected resistors 47, 50, and 51, and a leveling potentiometer represented by the resistor 48 and the adjustable resistor 46.

An important feature of this invention is the arrangement of the various components forming the speed control circuit, and the mounting of these components within the limit of space provided within the cover part B of the instrument, and yet provide for necessary access and cooling of those components which are subject to heating in use. It has been found that a circuit board 36 of circular shape, with a diameter of approximately only 1 /8 inches has been sufficient in size to support all components and still leave a space of a good one fourth inch between its periphery and the tubular wall 11 of the cup C within which it is mounted, as shown in FIG. 2, for the free flow of cooling air.

In the arrangement shown in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8, the pot 41a of the speed control potentiometer has a diameter of approximately seven-eights to 1 inch, at its area of attachment to the center of the circuit board 36, and which leaves a space of approximately /2 inch between the outer periphery of the pot 41 and the periphery of the circuit board 36, and which provides a ledge of sufficient width for the support components. The preferred type of potentiometer used presents a hub portion 41b at the top thereof which presents a flat seating face with an upwardly projecting lock stud 41c at one end thereof. Projecting centrally from the hub portion 41b is a collar extension 41d which is externally threaded and provides a journal which receives the spindle shaft 42. Contained within the pot 41a is a section which presents a fixed arcuate contact of approximately 270 in length and a movable contact associated with the lower end of the shaft 42 which forms a rheostat type of switch connected to the circuit and by means of which the current supplied to the motor is controlled.

FIGS. 6, 7, and 8 illustrate a desirable arrangement of the companion solid state components which support the effective operation of the speed control potentiometer 41. The tail wire 37 has one end connected to a post on. the upper side of the board 36 and its other end has a connector 37' for connection to the lead 30b from one of the core windings 17 of the motor. Preceding counterclockwise around the perimeter of the circuit board 36 as shown in FIG. 6, the triac 43 is mounted adjacent the tail 37, then the capacitor 44, then the capacitor 45, then the resistor 46, then the resistoi' 47 and then the circular shaped leveling potentiometer 48 which is close to the edge of the circular board 36 and presents a tool receiving slot 48 for adjusting its resistance. Continuing clockwise around the circuit board as shown in FIG. 6, we have the diac 49, followed by the resistors 50 and 51 adjacent input tail wire 38 which is connected to a post on the top side of the circuit board and which has a detachable connection 38' for connection to the power lead 39 as shown in FIG. 2.

When all of the solid state components shown in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8 have been connected by a printed circuit applied to the backside of the circuit board 36, insulating backing sheet 40 as shown in FIGS. 2, 7, and 8, is bonded to the underside of the circuit board to protect the printed circuit against possible short circuit contact with the motor M or any other part of the assembly. The electronic control assembly as shown in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8, can then be inserted within the retainer cup C with the threaded collar 41d of the potentiometer extending through a conformed hole in the center of the bottom wall of the cup C. The flat upper face of the potentiometer hub portion 4lb will snugly seat against the inside face of the cup bottom wall 10 and the lock stud 41c will extend through the lug hole 100 provided in the cup bottom wall to hold not only the speed control potentiometer but the circuit board 36 and all components mounted thereon in rigid position. A tubular sleeve 55 as shown in FIG. 10 presents an internal thread at its lower end which is telescoped over the potentiometer spindle shaft 42 and connected to the threaded collar 41d projecting through the bottom wall 10 of the cup and which thus binds the speed control assembly and cup in rigid assembly.

The shaft 42 and tubular sleeve 55 may then be inserted into the nose section 7 of the cover part B, and a seating cap 56 then applied to the outer end of the nose secton 7. The seating cap 56 presents an internally threaded barrel portion 56' which snugly telescopes into the end of the nose portion 7 and is screwed onto the external threads 55' of the sleeve 55. The seating cap 56 presents a flared shoulder 56" designed to seat against the free edge 7 of the nose section 7, and when the seating cap 56 is tightened, the cup C and the speed control assembly supported therein to securely locked in position within the cover part B. To facilitate rotative manipulation of the potentiometer shaft 42, a tubular rubber cushion 57 is inserted into the seating cap 56, its bore 57 is telescoped over the end of the shaft 42, and the ends of the cushion 57 seat against the end of the tubular sleeve 55 and against the innerface of a manipulating knob 58 which telescopes over the projecting end 42 of the spindle 42. The adjusting knob 58 may be removably secured to the shaft 42 by the provision of a set screw 58 designed to grip the flat face 42' of the spindle.

A power cable 35 carrying the usual power supply lines 34 and 39 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, and equipped with the usual coil sleeve 35', terminates in an end clamp 35" which secures the end of the cable in a hole provided in the end wall portion.6 of the cover part B and as may be necessary in a corresponding hole 10b in the bottom wall 10 of the cup C. The

power lead 39 may then be connected by a coupling 38 to the tail lead 38 extending from the circuit board 36. The tail lead 37 extending from the circuit board 36 is fixed by connector 37"to the lead 30b from one of the core windings 17, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 5. The other power lead 34 is secured by connector 34 to the lead 30a extending directly from theother core winding of the motor, as shown in FIG. 2. Thus, the entire speed control assembly of this invention is fully mounted in the cover part B and connections can be made to the motor M, before the cover part B is applied to the container part A.

In the form of the invention shown in FIG. 1, the lock nuts 12 are first applied to the rim of the cylindrical body wall 11 of the cup C and the depressed lip portion 5' of the cover flange 5 is telescoped under the free end of the container body wall 1. The set screws 12' are inserted into drilled holes which align with the lock nuts. The cover part B is thus rigidly bonded to the container part A and will not loosen during vibratory massage use.

It will be noted by referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, that the adjusting slot 48' in the leveling potentiometer 48 is positioned closely adjacent to the flange wall 5 of the cover part B. Thus a hole 48" may be provided in the flange wall 5 as shown in FIG. 1 through which a tool may be inserted which reaches the adjusting slot 48' so that the leveling potentiometer 48 may be adjusted to fix the lower speed limit of the vibratory motor to a uniform selected speed for all massagers. Measurements of the motor speed can be taken by the application of a measuring instrument to the casing of the massager.

FIGS. 1]., 12, and 13, illustrate a modified arrangement for securing the cover part B to the container part A of the instrument. As shown more particularly in FIGS. 11 and 12, the cylindrical body wall 1 of the container part A terminates in a depressed threaded extension 4 of relatively limited length. The cover part B presents a cylindrical flange 5a which telescopes within the depressed threaded extension 4 of the container part A, and its inner end is designed to abut against a rubber abutment ring 29 bonded to the inside face of the container wall 1 adjacent the inner face of an abutment shoulder 5' formed by the depressed flange extension 4. The cylindrical flange 5a of the cover part B merges into a depressed hip portion 6a defining a flat rim portion 6b which leads to the tapered end wall portion 6' of the cover part B.

Three spaced lock nuts 12 may be applied to the rim of the cylindrical body wall 11 of the cup C. Lock screws 12 extending through the cylindrical flange 5a, cup wall 11 and lock nut 12 secures the assembly together. If desired, the screws 12 may also be lengthened to extend through the depressed threaded flange extension 4 of the container part A. The depressed threaded flange extension 4 is normally covered and concelaed by a lock ring 13 having a cylindrical body wall portion 13' internally threaded and whose free end can be screwed into abutment against the shoulder abutment 5' of the container part. The lock rim 13 also presents an abutment rim 13" which rides onto the rim seat 6b and abuts the depressed portion 6a of the cover part to lock the nose part B to the container part A and also to provide a smooth and finished joint 5' therebetween as shown in FIG. 13. In this assembly, the adjusting hole 48' in the speed leveling potentiometer 48 is accessible for manipulation by providing an aligned hole 48 in the depressed container flange 4 and to which a tool may be applied, when the lock ring 13 is backed off as shown in FIG. 12. In this arrangement the socket hole for tool application is not in evidence when the lock ring 13 is in closed position as shown in FIG. 13, thus avoiding improper or unauthorized tampering with the motor speed.

Effective cooling of all components of the speed control circuit as well as the motor itself is affected and assured by the cooling system of this invention. By referring to FIGS. 1, 2, 10, 11 and 13, a series of air inlet holes 8a are provided in the tapered nose extension 7 of the cover part B, and if desired, spaced air inlet holes 8b may also be provided in the tapered end wall portion 6 of the cover part. The only place for the entering air to escape is from the holes 3a and 3b in the container section A adjacent the hemispherical end 2 thereof.

Since air entry ports 8a and 8b have an overall air entry area of less than one-half the air exit area of the ports 3a and 3b from which the warmed air escapes, it will be appreciated that by using a suction fan F having a capacity to move more than twice the amount of air as compared to fans previously used in hand massagers, that the admitted air flows through the electronic speed control assembly and the center of the motor at substantial velocity for ejection by the fan blades laterally through the ports 3a and 3b.

As is more particularly evident by referring to FIGS. 2, 4, 5, l and 11, the air entering the ports 8a and 8b flows through the numerous air holes 1011 formed in the bottom wall 10 of the cup C, with the inflowing air washing over and around the speed control potentiometer 41 and the various solid state supporting components to effectively cool all components before the air splashes over the rim of the circular circuit board 36 and joins additionally air flowing through the ports 10a and the space between the cup wall 11 and the perimeter of the circuit board. This air flowing at rather high velocity has no means of escape except to be drawn through the center of the motor M and particularly between the outer surface of its rotor 18 and the arcuate faces of the inner stator core sections 16 where heating is most likely to develop during operation of the motor. The air continues its velocity flow through the center of the motor until it reaches the fan blades 31 which operate to throw the warmed air laterally out of the casing A through the outlet ports 3a and 3b. Thus this velocity flow of air around all components of the electronic speed control assembly and around all components of the motor which are inclined to become heated during operation, rapidly removes the generated heat so that the outer surface of the casing A maintains a warmed but not overheated temperature which is most desirable for therapeutic massage.

Body massagers such as disclosed in this application preferably employ alternating current motors, but may employ direct current motors, designed to be plugged into available house current. However since voltage may differ in various sectional areas or in different countries, this factor is taken into account in selecting solid state components which have the necessary preformance characteristics to harmonize with the voltage of the input power source. The size and characteristics which the circuit components should embrace to satisfy the available input voltage can be determined by computation, and the suppliers of solid state components can usually furnish the components which are selectively adapted for particular power input voltage.

While certain novel features of this invention have been disclosed herein and pointed out in the claims, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions, and changes may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of this invention.

We claim:

1. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes, a container part having a tubular body wall closed at one end by a hemispherical end wall, a vibration producing motor fully contained and supported within said container part; a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange, a solid state motor speed control assembly contained in said cover part, means for supporting said speed control assembly within the tubular flange and tubular nose extension of said cover part, detachable leads for connecting said speed control assembly in series with one of the power input leads and one of the winding input leads from the motor, an element connected to said speed control assembly for controlling the speed of the motor and accessible for finger manipulation exteriorly of said nose extension; and means for rigidly securing the tubular flange of said cover part with the motor speed control circuit assembled therein, to the free end of said container part.

2. A therapeutic massager whose means for supporting said speed control assembly as defined in claim 1 is in the form of a sturdy plate contained within said tubular flange with the periphery of said plate braced against the inner surface of the shoulder portion of said cover part and upon which said speed control assembly is mounted.

3. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes, a container part having a tubular body wall closed at one end by a hemispherical end wall, a vibration producing motor fully contained and supported within said container part; a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange; a solid state motor speed control assembly supported by and assembled within said cover part and which includes a motor speed control potentiometer whose pot is connected to leads from said motor and power source, a manipulating stem extending from said pot into the nose extension of the cover part, and a finger manipulating element connected to said stern and accessible for finger manipulation exteriorly of said nose extension; and means for rigidly securing the tubular flange of said cover part, with the motor speed control assembly contained therein, to the free end of said container part.

4. A therapeutic massager as defined in claim 3 which is further characterized by a cup shaped member whose bottom rim is snugly seated against the inner face of the shoulder portion of said cover part and whose bottom wall supports the pot of the potentiometer.

5. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes; a tubular container housing a vibration producing motor; a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange; a solid state motor speed control assembly presenting a speed control potentiometer having a pot secured to a circuit board contained within said tubular flange, a sturdy discshaped member having a rim which seats against the innerface of the shoulder portion of said cover part and against which the top side of the potentiometer pot is designed to seat, a tubular sleeve secured at one end thereof to a portion of said potentiometer pot and adjustably secured at the other end thereof to the terminal end of said nose extension, a shaft having one end thereof contained in said potentiometer pot and connected to resistance means for controlling the speed of the motor, and an adjusting knob secured to the other end of said shaft for manipulating said shaft; and means for detachably securing the flange portion of said cover part, with the motor speed control circuit packaged therein, to the terminal end of the tubular container.

6. A therapeutic massager as defined in claim which includes a potentiometer pot whose topside also presents a tubular collar which extends through a conforming hole in the center of said disc-shaped member and which provides a journal for the potentiometer shaft extending therethrough, means for securing the lower end of said sleeve to said collar, and a seating cap adjustably secured to the other end of said tubular sleeve and presenting a shoulder which seats on the terminal end of said nose extension.-

7. A therapeutic massager adpated to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes; a tubular container housing a vibration producing motor; a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange, a supporting cup contained within said tubular flange and presenting a bottom rim seating against the inner face of said shoulder portion, a solid state motor speed control assembly presenting a speed control potentiometer having a pot centrally mounted on a circular circuit board positioned within the tubular wall of said supporting cup, a series of auxiliary solid state components mounted on said circuit board in surrounding relation to said potentiometer pot, the top side of said potentiometer pot seating against the adjacent face of the bottom wall of said cup and presenting a collar portion extending through the bottom wall of said cup, a tubular sleeve secured at one end thereof to the collar portion of said potentiometer pot and adjustably secured at the other end thereof to the terminal end of said nose extension, a motor speed adjusting shaft having one end thereof journalled in said collar portion and extending through said sleeve, and an adjusting knob secured to the other end of said shaft for manipulating said shaft; and means for detachably securing the flange portion of said cover part, with the motor speed control assembly packaged therein, to the terminal end of the tubular container.

8. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes, a container part having a tubular body wall closed at one end by a hemispherical end wall, a vibration producing motor fully contained and supported within said container part; a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange, a supporting cup contained within said tubular flange and presenting a bottom rim seating against the inside face of said shoulder portion, a solid state motor speed control assembly presenting a circular circuit board contained within the tubular wall of said cup in spaced relation thereto and having the pot of a speed control potentiometer secured to the central area of said circuit board with a series of solid state support components secured to said board in surrounding relation to said pot, an externally threaded collar portion projecting from the upper face of said pot and through a conforming hole in the bottom wall of said cup, a tubular sleeve secured at one end thereof to the projecting collar portion of said potentiometer pot, a cap member having a barrel portion extending into the open end of said nose extension and internally threaded to the adjacent end of said tubular sleeve, said cap member presenting an abutment shoulder seating against the outer end of said nose extension to thereby secure said speed control assembly to said cover part, a motor speed adjusting shaft extending into said pot and through said sleeve and cap member and an adjusting knob secured to the outer end of said shaft; and means for detachably securing the flange portion of said cover part and the tubular wall of said cup to the terminal end of the tubular container.

9. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes, a container part having a tubular body wall closed at one end by a hemispherical end wall, an alternating current vibration producing motor fully contained and supported within said container part; a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange, a supporting cup contained within said tubular flange and presenting a bottom rim seating against the inside face of said shoulder portion, a solid state motor speed control assembly positioned within said cup and which present a circular circuit board whose perimeter is contained within and spaced from the tubular wall of said cup, air inlet holes in the nose extension of said cover part which lead to air inlet holes in the bottom wall of said cup, air outlet holes in the tubular body of said container part which present a larger air outlet area than the air inlet holes in the nose extension, a high capacity suction fan fixed to and driven by the shaft of the motor rotor and positioned adjacent said air outlet holes, said fan blades being of such shape and area as to draw outside air at considerable velocity through the air inlet holes in said nose extension, through the air passage holes in the bottom wall of said cup so that the incoming air washes all components of said motor speed control assembly and then escapes between the perimeter of the circuit board and the tubular wall of the cup, said cup guiding the air stream into the open end of the motor with sufficient velocity flow through the passage between the rotor and inner stator core sections to effectively remove undesired heat as generated during operation of the motor and its withdrawal from the motor for lateral expulsion by the suction fan through the air outlet ports in the tubular body wall of the container part.

10. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes, a container part having a tubular body wall closed at one end by a hemispherical end wall, a vibration producing motor fully contained and supported within said container part, a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a tubular flange, a depressed rim extending from said tubular flange and designed to underlie the free edge of the tubular body wall of the container part, a supporting cup contained within said tubular flange and presenting a bottom rim seating against the inside face of said shoulder portion and a tubular wall covering the inner face of said flange; a solid state motor speed control assembly positioned within and supported by said cup, means for detachably connecting said motor speed control assembly in circuit with power input leads and with the leads from said vibratory motor; and means for securing said cover part with the motor speed control assembly contained therein to the container part which includes, fasteners extending through the tubular wall of the cover part, through the tubular flange of the container part and through the tubular wall of the cup.

11. A therapeutic massager as defined in claim which embraces the further feature of a tool access hole in the flange of said cover part which extends to a tuning potentiometer forming a part of said motor speed control assembly and contained in said cup, and whereby a selected tool may be applied thereto for setting the lowermost speed limit of the motor.

12. A therapeutic massager adapted to be held in the hand and applied to selected portions of the human form which includes, a container part having a tubular body wall closed at one end by a hemispherical end wall and at its other end presenting a depressed threaded flange extension, a vibration producing motor fully contained and supported within said container part, a separable cover part presenting a tubular nose extension having an outwardly flared end wall portion which merges through a shoulder portion into a raised hip portion and thence into a tubular flange, a supporting cup presenting a tubular wall within the tubular flange of the cover part and whose bottom wall presents a bottom rim seating against the inside face of said shoulder portion, a solid state motor speed control assembly positioned within and supported by said cup, means for detachably connecting said motor speed control assembly in circuit with the power input leads and with the leads from said vibratory motor, means for securing the tubular wall of said cup to the tubular flange of the cover part; and a lock ring having a threaded tubular section adapted to be applied to the depressed threaded flange extension of said container part, and a rounded hip portion adapted to be brought into abutment against the hip portion of said cover UNT IEI) STATES PATE T OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent Dated October l5 1974.

Robert W. Albach, Kenneth R. Mathers and Inventor(s) Reuben g Car]snn 4 It is certified that error appears in the aboVeQidentified patent} and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column line 60, change "emerges" to -r n'erges-- Column 3 'line 55, correct the spelling of "flange" Column 5, line 15, change "consi'derable' to -and- Signed and sealed this 31st day of December 1974.

(SE LL) Attest:

MCCOY GIBSON JR. 0. MARSE-ZALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-IOSO (10459) C USCOMM-DC 50376-P69 7* ".5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 969 0-366-33L

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Classifications
U.S. Classification601/72
International ClassificationA61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H23/0263
European ClassificationA61H23/02R2