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Publication numberUS3843220 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1974
Filing dateFeb 16, 1972
Priority dateFeb 16, 1972
Also published asCA976351A1
Publication numberUS 3843220 A, US 3843220A, US-A-3843220, US3843220 A, US3843220A
InventorsSnider W
Original AssigneeWanda Snider
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Simulated cake and container for cut and wrapped cake pieces
US 3843220 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Snider SIMULATED CAKE AND CONTAINER FOR CUT AND WRAPPED CAKE PIECES [75] Inventor: William Snider, Detroit, Mich.

[73] Assignee: Wanda Snider, Detroit, Mich. a

part interest [22] Filed: Feb. 16. 1972 [21] App1.No.:226,810

[52] U.S. Cl. 312/204 [51] Int. Cl. A47b 17/04, A47b 97/00 [58] Field of Search 312/204. 284; 108/101;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1.145.205 7/1915 Mills 108/101 1934896 11/1933 Ebert 108/101 1.956.395 4/1934 Montgomery... 312/284 X 2.178.166 10/1939 Enstrom 108/101 2.203.540 6/1940 Montgomery... 312/204 2.302.850 11/1942 Funke 206/52 R 2.347.041 4/1944 Filsinger 312/204 2.695.115 ll/1954 Roop 220/97 F 2.820.683 1/1958 Monaco 312/284 X 2.921.691 1/1960 Dembinski 108/101 3.169.496 2/1965 Muggli ct 111.... 108/101 3.236.389 2/1966 Murdock [08/101 X 3.330.610 7/1967 Schnabel 312/284 3.480.150 11/1969 Cornell et a1. 211/128 X A multiple layer simulated cake and container struc- FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 11.910 l/1904 Great Britain 108/101 Primary ExaminerPau1 R. Gilliam Attorney, Agent, or FirmRobert G. Mentag ABSTRACT ture which includes a plurality of containers adapted to be arranged in a vertical stacked arrangement wherein the containers increase in size from the uppermost container down to the lowermost container. The lowermost container is disposed on a base plate. Each container is provided on its upper end with a retainer means for retaining the next above disposed container in position. Each container is adapted to hold a plurality of cut and wrapped pieces of cake. The containers may be variously shaped, as for example, square, round and so forth. The outer surfaces of the containers are adapted to be coated with suitable icing and decorations to provide a multiple layer simulated cake for weddings and other occasions. Each container with icing thereon provides a simulated cake layer or tier. The uppermost layer of the simulated cake formed with the structure of the present invention may be a real cake for occasions wherein a formal cutting at the ceremony is desired.

6 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures PATENTED OCT 22 I972 SREU 2 I! 5 PATENTEDUBI 22 I974 SHEEI 5 (IF 5 SIMULATED CAKE AND CONTAINER FOR CUT AND WRAPPED CAKE PIECES SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the cake art, and more particularly, to a novel multiple layer simulated cake and container structure for cut and wrapped pieces of cake. Heretofore, a skilled and trained artisan was necessary to prepare and fabricate a multiple layer real cake, such as a wedding cake. The need for a skilled and specially trained baker to prepare such cakes is a factor which adds to the cost of a cake, and this is a disadvantage. Another disadvantage of the prior art multiple layer real cakes is that much time is spent in measuring and leveling a multiple real layer cake. A further disadvantage of the conventional multiple layer real cake is that it is not possible to make a cake with a plurality of 'layers from a light cake material, as a sponge cake. Still another disadvantage of a conventional multiple layer cake is that it is necessary to provide an experienced person, at extra cost, at weddings and the like, to perform the cutting operation in order to reduce as much as possible the mess created by the actual cutting, due to the crumbs and icing portions falling off the table and onto the floor adjacent to where the cake is being cut.

In view of the foregoing, it is an important object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved multiple layer simulated cake and container structure which overcomes the aforementioned disadvantages of the prior art conventional multiple layer cakes.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel multiple layer simulated cake and container structure which can be assembled and filled with cut an wrapped pieces of cake by unskilled workers, and which assembled structure may then be iced. The structure of the present invention eliminates the skill heretofore required for measuring and leveling the various layers or tiers ofa multiple layer cake, and accordingly, a simulated cake of this type can be made at less cost and without the services of a skilled and trained baker. The structure of the present invention also eliminates any cake layer sliding or tilting which sometimes occurs in regular or conventional multiple layer cakes, especially when such cakes are transported. The icing on the outer surface of the layer containers may be real, or artificial whereby a skilled decorator is not needed at all, and the containers could be re-used or thrown away.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a novel multiple layer simulated cake and container structure which permits the cut and wrapped cake pieces to be made from any type of cake, as for example, a real light cake, as a sponge cake which heretofore was not usable in the fabricating of a multiple layer or tier conventional cake. The structure of the present invention also permits the using of colored or flavored cake, as chocolate cake, which sometimes shows through holes in conventional icing to show spots of the colored cake.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a novel multiple layer simulated cake and container structure wherein the usual mess, which occurs when a cake is cut at a wedding or the like, is avoided and payment to a special person for cutting the cake is eliminated, because the cake is precut into pieces and wrapped and then packed in the various containers that form the layers of the simulated cake. The structure of the present invention may be used in such a manner wherein the top layer of the cake may be made as a real cake to provide at least one layer to be cut if a cutting of the cake is desired at a wedding or the like. Decorated empty containers could be added, preferably at the bottom end, to provide a larger cake for show purposes than what would ordinarily be needed. The structure of the present invention may also be used with conventional separators between the various layers, if desired.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide a novel multiple layer simulated cake and container structure wherein the containers may be square shaped, heart shaped, round and the like, as desired. The containers may be made from any suitable material, as from plastic, cardboard and the like, and of any desired color, and wherein the outer surface of the containers may be provided with permanent or real icing. The cake structure of the present invention eliminates the need to get cake napkins for a wedding, which sometimes are forgotten.

Other features and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following detailed description, appended claims, and the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of a simulated cake and container structure made in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 and showing the simulated cake and container structure in a final decorated form.

FIG. 3 is an elevational section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 2, with parts removed, taken along the line 3-3 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, perspective view of the upper end of the simulated cake and container structure of FIG. 2, and showing the upper layer container being removed to expose a plurality of cut, stacked and wrapped pieces of cake.

FIG. 5 is a horizontal section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 1, taken along the line 5-5 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, enlarged elevational view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 1, taken along the line 66 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary, front elevational view of a modified upper end structure of a simulated cake and container structure made in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary, enlarged elevational section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 7, taken along the line 8-8 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged, horizontal section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 7, taken along the line 99 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary, elevational section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 9, taken along the line ture made in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 12 is an enlarged, horizontal section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 11, taken along the line 1212 thereof, and looking in the direction of the ar- I'OWS.

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary, elevational section view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 12, taken along the line 13-13 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view, with parts broken away, of a support plate portion of the structure illustrated in FIG. 11.

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary, elevational section view, similar to that of FIG. 3, and showing still another embodiment of a simulated cake and container structure made in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 16 is a horizontal view of the structure illustrated in FIG. 15, taken along the line 1616 thereof, with parts removed, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary, elevational section view similar to FIG. 15, and showing a structure slightly modified from that of FIG. 15.

FIG. 18 is a horizontal'view, with parts removed, of the structure illustrated in FIG. 17, taken along the line 1818 thereof, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 19 is a fragmentary, elevational section view,

similar to that of FIG. 15, and showing another struc- DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings, and in particular to FIG. 1, wherein is shown an illustrative embodiment of -the invention, the numeral 10 designates a flat base plate which is substantially square in plan configuration. A plurality of containers 11, 12, 13 and 14 are stacked in pyramid fashion on the base plate 10. The

uppermost container 14 is the smallest in size and the other containers increase in size in accordance with their position downwardly from the container 14. The containers 11 through 14 are rectangular in overall configuration and they are hollow and open on the lower ends thereof.

The containers 11 through 14 are releasably retained in place on each other and on the base plate 10 by the following described structure. As illustrated in FIG. 5, the uppermost container 14 includes a front wall 19, a rear wall 20, a left side wall 21 and a right side wall 22. As shown in FIG. 1, the upper end of the container 14 is enclosed by a top end wall 18. The aforementioned side walls and top wall of the container 14 are integrally formed. Each of the other containers 11, 12 and 13 is also similarly formed and the various walls thereof have been marked with the same reference numerals. As shown in FIG. 3, each of the containers 11 through 14 is open at the lower end thereof. As shown in FIG. 5, four triangularly shaped retainer blocks 25 are disposed on the upper side of the top wall 18 of the container 13, and they are adapted to nest inside of the corners formed at the lower ends of the meeting points of the various side walls of the container 14.

It will be seen that the retainer blocks 25 prevent the container 14 from sliding horizontally on the top wall 18 of the container 13. It will be understood that each of the containers 11 and 12 is also provided with the same type of retainer blocks 25 which function as a retainer means for releasably retaining in place the containers l2 and 13 on their respective supporting containers.

As shown in FIG. 3, each of the top walls 18 of the containers 11 through 14 are provided with a suitable finger hole 17 for removing a container from its supporting container, as illustrated in FIG. 4 wherein the container 14 is shown being lifted off of the container 13 to expose the plurality of cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16 which are packed in container 14. As shown in FIG. 6, the base plate 10 is provided with similar retainer blocks 25 for retaining the lowermost container' 11 in place on the base plate 10.

In use, the uppermost container would be disposed in an upside down position resting on its top wall 18. A plurality of cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16 would then be packed in an orderly manner in the container 14. The container 13 would then be mounted onto the container 14 in an upside down position. It will be understood that the pieces of cake 16 are mounted in the container 14 in a position so as to provide room at the corners thereof for the reception of the retainer blocks 25 on the top wall 18 of the container 13.

The container 13 is then loaded with cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16 in the same manner as carried out in loading container 14. The container 12 is then mounted in an upside down position on the container 13, and the aforementioned loading procedure is again followed. After the container 12 is loaded, the container 11 is also disposed in an upside down position on top of the container 12 and loaded in the same manner. After the container 11 is loaded the base plate 10 is mounted on top of the container 11. The upside down loaded structure of the present invention is then turned upside down as a unit and disposed as shown in FIG. 1.

It will be understood that the structure of the present invention could also be loaded by merely placing a plurality of cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16 on top of the base plate 10 and then mounting the container 11 thereover. The other containers could then be loaded in the same manner by successively stacking a plurality of the cake pieces 16 on the top walls 18 of the containers ll, 12 and 13, and mounting the containers 12, 13 and 14 thereover.

After the containers have been loaded with cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16, as described hereinabove, the outer surfaces of the containers are then covered with suitable coatings of icing 11a, 12a, 13a and 14a, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. A suitable ornamental material, as for example, the figures of a bride and groom, as shown in FIG. 2, may be disposed on the upper end of the uppermost container 14. The multiple layer simulated cake is then ready for transportation to the place of the wedding reception or other ceremony for which the cake is to be used.

It will be seen that the structure of the present invention permits the fabricating of a multiple layer simulated wedding cake and the like without the need for any skilled baker, since there is no need for measuring,

leveling and so forth, which is normally required in the fabricating of a conventional multiple layer cake. The multiple layer simulated cake shown in FIG. 2 can be fabricated with only the necessary labor for cutting the cake and wrapping the cake pieces, and packing them in the various containers. The only special skill required would be in the icing of the outer surfaces of the various containers and in mounting the ornamental material 15.

It will be seen that the structure of the present invention provides a multiple layer cake which can be readily and easily transported without fear of having the various layers slide relative to each other.

It will also be understood that the structure of the present invention permits a wedding cake to be made from cake materials which heretofore could not be used. For example, a wedding cake can now be a light cake, such as a sponge cake, since the lower layers of the cake are not weight carrying members in any way. The weight of each layer is carried by the various container structures. Heretofore, many bakers would not make a wedding cake from a chocolate material or other colored material since it was possible that a small opening in the icing would show the colored cake material inside. This disadvantage has been overcome with the structure of the present invention and it is possible to now provide chocolate wedding cakes, and the like. The cake used may also be made in square or rectangular cake pans.

Although the containers 11 through 14 are shown as being square shaped in plan configuration, it will be understood that they may be made with other shapes, as for example, they may be round in plan configuration, heart shaped, and so forth. It will also be understood that the base plate and the containers 11 through 14 may be made from any suitable, economical material whereby they could be thrown away after one use, or they could be made from material of a strength and construction to permit them to be reused. The various containers 11 through 14 may also be made from various materials, as for example, from suitable plastic materials, and they may be variously colored and have hollow portions in which an electric light may be disposed for providing a lighting effect to the simulated cake. It will also be understood that the icing on the outer surfaces of the containers may be of a permanent type material for a reusable type of container, or it may be of the regular edible type icing, if desired.

It will be seen that the structure of the present invention provides a baker with a structure which can be used to fabricate a wedding cake in a much shorter time and with less skilled help, whereby he can provide a ckae at a lower price than heretofore possible. It will also be understood that although only four layers or tiers have been illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, that any practical number of layers could be provided. In many cases, the owners of halls which are rented for wedding parties require that a special person skilled in the art of cake cutting be provided to cut the wedding cake to prevent a mess at the cutting area. The structure of the present invention eliminates the need for any special person to cut the cake since the pieces of cake 16 are already cut and wrapped and ready for handing out at the proper time. The ornamental piece need only be removed and a finger inserted in the finger hole 17 on the container 14, and this container can then be lifted up to expose the cut pieces of cake 16.

FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10 illustrate the use of a separator means between the various layers of the simulated cake, if desired. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10, the various containers and their partshave been marked with the same reference numerals as used in the first embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 6, followed by the small letter b. FIGS. 7 through 10 illustrate the provision of a separator means between the containers 13b and 14b. The separator means comprises an upper separator plate 26 on which is disposed the container 14b and a lower flat plate 32 which rests on the top end of the container 13b. The separator plates 26 and 32 are interconnected by a plurality of separator legs or pillars as described. The separator plates 26 and 32 and the pillar legs may be made from any suitable material as, for example, a plastic material, and preferably from the same material from which the containers are made.

As illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10, the lower separator plate 32 is disposed on the upper end wall 18 of the container 13b in a position inside of the triangular retainer block 25b. A centrally disposed round retainer pin 33 is integrally formed on the lower sideof the separator plate 32 and it is adapted to be inserted through the finger hole 17 in the container top end wall 18.

As shown in FIG. 9, four separator legs are employed in the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10. However, it will be understood that any suitable and practical number of separator legs could be employed. While only one separator leg will be described, it will be understood that the structure is similar for the other separator legs.

As shown in FIG. 8, each of the separator legs or pillars is provided with an inverted conically shaped, hollow upper end 28 which is adapted to slidably receive a downwardly extended and mating conical pin 27 which is integrally formed on the lower side of the upper separator plate 26. The separator pillar also includes a middle cyclindrical and hollow portion 29 which has its upper end integrally connected with the upper conical end portion 28. The lower end of the pillar middle portion 29 is integrally connected to the upper end of a conically shaped lower end portion 30 which slidably receives a conically shaped retainer pin 31 as integrally formed on the upper side of the lower separator plate 32. It will be understood that more than FIGS. l1, 12, 13 and 14 illustrate a third embodiment of the invention wherein the containers include a number of square shaped containers and a numberof round shaped containers, together with a separator means. The parts illustrated in FIGS. 11 through 14 which are the same as the parts of the first embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 6 have been marked with the same reference numerals followed by the small letter 0.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 11 through 14, the lower portion of the structure includes the base plate 10c, the container and the container 120. Mounted on top of the container is an intermediate base plate 35 which is provided with an integral peripheral vertical wall 36 which extends downwardly and is disposed around the retainer blocks 250 to hold the plate 35 in place in a position spaced upwardly from the wall 18c. The intermediate base plate 35 is provided on its upper side with a plurality of integral, upwardly extended arcuate retainer blocks 38 over which is mounted the circular wall 43 of a round container generally indicated by the numeral 39. A plurality of arcuate retainer blocks 38 are also formed on the upper wall 44 of the container 39 for retaining in place the circular side wall 43 of the next upwardly disposed round container 40.

As shown in FIGS. 12, 13 and 14 the intermediate base plate 35 is provided with a finger hole 37. A suitable separator means 42 is disposed on the circular container 43 and it carries the uppermost round or circular container 41.

It will be understood that each of the circular containers 39, 40 and 41 is provided with suitable finger holes 45, formed through each of the top end walls 44 (FIG. 11). The pillars or legs of the separator means 42 are constructed in the same manner as separator pillars illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8. The separator means 42 is shown as being provided with an upper plate 46 and a lower plate 47, and these separator plates 46 and 47 are formed in the same manner as the intermediate base plate 39 so that the lower plate 47 will receive the arcuate retainer blocks 38 on the top end wall 44 of the container 40. The upper separator plate 46 is provided with arcuate retainer blocks 38 on which the side wall 43 of the container 41 is mounted.

FIGS. 15 and 16 illustrate a slight modification of the structure of the first embodiment of FIGS. 1 through 6, and the corresponding parts are marked with similar reference numerals followed by the smaller letter d. In the modified structure of FIGS. 15 and 16, a rectangular groove is formed in the top end wall of each of the containers below the top container, and in the base plate, so as to receive the lower ends 51 of the container walls of the next above disposed container. A flat square surface 52 on the inside of the groove 50 is provided with a plurality of finger holes 53. As illustrated in FIG. 15, a low walled tray 54 is disposed on the top end wall surface 52, for the reception of cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16. The structure of FIGS. 15 and 16 permits the cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16 to be packed in a tray 54 in each of the containers, and the entire cake structure to be loaded and packed, starting with a tray seated on the base plate and which is to be covered by the lowermost container.

FIGS. 17 and 18 illustrate a slight modification of the structure illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 16, and the corresponding parts have been marked with the same reference numerals followed by the small letter e. In the structure of FIGS. 17 and 18 the load supporting top end wall l8e of the containers, other than the topmost container, and the base plate, are provided with a square shaped opening 57 therethrough around which is formed a ledge 60 that has a vertical outer wall or shoulder 58. Thenext above container is disposed on the ledge 60 and with a high walled tray 59 as shown in FIG. 17 being disposed on said ledge 60 within the container and filled with cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16.

FIGS. 19 and 20 illustrate a slightly modified structure from that illustrated in the first embodiment of FIG. 3. In the structure of FIGS. 19 and 20, the parts which correspond to the parts of the first embodiment have been marked with the same reference numerals followed by the small letter f. In the structure of FIGS. 19 and 20, the top end wall of the containers,

other than the uppermost container, and the base plate, is provided with an outer ledge around the periphery thereof, indicated by the numeral 62, and on which is adapted to be seated the lower ends of the walls of the next above positioned container. The cut and wrapped pieces of cake 16 are disposed on the top end wall surface 63 within the peripheral ledge 62.

The base plate and the variously shaped containers may be made from suitable plastic materials, cardboard, wood and the like. The separators are conventional and available on the market.

In some simulated cake structures it may be desirable to use containers made from more than one material. For example, it may be desirable to use plastic containers for the lower containers and cardboard containers for the upper containers.

While it will be apparent that the preferred embodiments of the invention herein disclosed are well calculated to fulfill the objects above stated, it will be appreciated that the invention is susceptible to modification, variation and change.

What is claimed is:

1. A multiple layer simulated cake and container structure comprising:

a. a base plate;

b. a plurality of hollow containers disposed on said base plate in a stacked vertical arrangement with each container being constructed for holding a plurality of cut and wrapped pieces of cake, separate from the plurality of cut and wrapped pieces of cake in the other containers;

0. said containers being of increasing size from the uppermost one downwardly;

(I. each of said containers having continuous side walls, and being open at the lower end thereof and closed at the top end thereof by an integral top end wall that carries the cut and wrapped pieces of cake in the next above disposed container;.

e. retainer means for releasably retaining said containers against lateral movement relative to each other, and the lowermost container against lateral movement on the base plate and which permits the containers to be removed, successively, starting from the uppermost one, for dispensing the cut and wrapped pieces of cake; and,

f. said containers having the outer surfaces coated with real decorative icing.

2. A multiple layer simulated cake and container structure as defined in claim 1, wherein:

a. a separator means is disposed between at least one pair of adjacent containers.

3. A multiple layer simulated cake and container structure as defined in claim 1, wherein:

a. a tray is mounted in each of said containers for holding the cut and wrapped pieces of cake.

4. A multiple layer simulated cake and container structure as defined in claim 1, wherein:

a. each of the top end walls of the containers, except the uppermost container, is provided with a groove for the reception of the lower ends of the side walls of the next uppermost container.

5. A multiple layer simulated cake and container structure as defined in claim 4, wherein:

a. said base plate is provided with a groove for the reception of the lower ends of the side walls of the container seated thereon.

6. A multiple layer simulated cake and containe structure as defined in claim 1 wherein:

a. each of the containers, except the uppermost container, is provided with a ledge around the periphery thereof for the reception of the lower ends of the side walls of the next uppermost container.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4132457 *Mar 8, 1976Jan 2, 1979Parrish Richard AProtective cover for wedding cakes, or other display items
US4461790 *Dec 2, 1982Jul 24, 1984William SniderSimulated cake and collapsible container therefor
US4947722 *May 24, 1989Aug 14, 1990Lewis Fredric JMusic box arrangements for cakes, toys, ornaments, and the like
US5343815 *Jul 2, 1992Sep 6, 1994Dibro LimitedIn a kit for supporting a cake
US5413801 *Apr 15, 1991May 9, 1995Mcilwain; Lillian P.Method and apparatus for serving confectionaries
US6170961Jun 11, 1999Jan 9, 2001Joanne J. KnochIlluminated cake stand
US6231910 *Aug 2, 1999May 15, 2001Sue EllingsworthBaking pan for multi-tier cake and method of using it
US6919096Mar 12, 2003Jul 19, 2005Walter SelkCake-shaped cookie package and display
US7021465Apr 23, 2004Apr 4, 2006Mcguigan Rosemarie ESimulated wedding cake
US7287870Feb 13, 2006Oct 30, 2007Knoch Joanne JIlluminated cake stand display
DE29719667U1 *Oct 24, 1997Jan 2, 1998Hp Haushaltprodukte GmbhBehälter
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/204, 428/7
International ClassificationB65D85/30, B65D21/02, B65D85/36, B65D71/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/36, B65D71/00, B65D21/0235
European ClassificationB65D21/02H, B65D71/00