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Publication numberUS3844318 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1974
Filing dateApr 18, 1973
Priority dateApr 18, 1973
Publication numberUS 3844318 A, US 3844318A, US-A-3844318, US3844318 A, US3844318A
InventorsRaia D, Staples B
Original AssigneeRaia D, Staples B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe loading guide
US 3844318 A
Abstract
A syringe loading guide to permit accurate placement of a syringe needle into a medication bottle and to permit accurate incremental loading of the syringe; in which a template-like body receives the medication bottle and the syringe, locating them for the correct depth of the needle in the bottle; and having ribs calibrated to dosage increments for passage thereover by the plunger knob of the syringe as it is withdrawn.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Raia et a1.

1 1 Oct. 29, 1974 SYRINGE LOADING GUIDE Inventors: David C. Raia, 81 Ridge St.,

Arlington, Mass. 02174; Brewster H. Staples, l3 Squanto Rd., Woburn, Mass. 01801 Filed: Apr. 18, 1973 Appl. No.: 352,107

[52] US. Cl 141/27, 141/95, 128/218 C [51] Int. Cl B65b 3/32 [58] Field of Search 128/218 C; 141/1,2, 18, 141/27, 369-373, 375-378, 94, 95, 19, 329,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1971 Le Marie 141/94 3,770,026 11/1973 lsenberg 141/94 Primary Examiner-Houston S. Bell, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Lawrence S. Cohen 11 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENIED um 29 1914 SHEET 10F 2 FIG. 3

FIG. 2

FIG. I

SYRINGE LOADING GUIDE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The loading of a syringe is a precision task usually done by a nurse or other trained person. Often, however, the loading must be done by the intended recipient of the medication by self-administration, or by some other non-professional. The difficulty observed with non-professional loading of syringes is multiplied when the person doing it is ill, elderly, or blind; a common situation when self-administration is called fool. In particular, in the cases of blind or nearly blind persons with diabetes, the repeated loading of syringes for the injection of insulin requires their dependance on some other person, or results in continual uncertainty as to whether a correct dosage has been loaded.

Diabetic retinopathy (blindness from diabetes) occurs normally after years of suffering from diabetes. It occurs only 5.7 percent of the time after one year of diabetes; but 58 percent of the time in diabetics of years duration. As the life expectancy of diabetics is prolonged by medical advances, the chances for retinopathy increases. Thus elderly diabetic retinopaths are ever increasing in number. The results of an incorrect dosage of insulin to a diabetic can be catastrophic and can cause permanent damage. Therefore the need for an aid in loading syringes is acute; and such aids must be designed to give confidence to the user in their continued accuracy.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION FIG. 1 is a top view of one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a view of a medication bottle and a hypodermic syringe arranged as though in the guide of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side view, partially broken away, showing the guide and showing a syringe in place.

FIG. 4 is aside view, partially in section, of an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a top view of an embodiment of the incremental loading control part of the guide.

FIG. 6 is a top view of an embodiment of the incremental loading control part of the guide.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIGS. 1 and 3 show a syringe loading guide 1, in template form, whose body structure has a middle part 2 for receiving a syringe in opening 3; a forward part 4 for receiving a medication bottle; and an incremental loading control part 5. The syringe receiving part 2 has its opening of such size and shape to receive a conventional hypodermic syringe 6 such a shown in FIG. 2

along with a medication bottle 7, aligned in FIG. 2 as they would be in the guide I.

These hypodermic syringes may be made of plastic or glass or combinations thereof and often are equipped with a bevel or reduced diameter portion on the front of the barrel to receive a disposable needle assembly. One such syringe is the Monojet SOI-IN made by Sherwood Medical Industries, Inc., for use in injecting U-40 or U- insulin. This syringe has two scales on its barrel, each indicating up to one cubic centimeter of fluid. The U-80 scale is graduated from 0 to 80, each line on the scale being spaced about l/32 inch apart, and designating one unit of medication. The U-40 scale is graduated from O to 40, each line on the scale being spaced about 1/16 inch apart, and designating one unit of medication.

As shown in FIG. 2, the syringe comprises a barrel 8, a flange 9, a plunger 10, and a knob 11. The disposable needle assembly, as typically illustrated comprises a needle 12 and a body 13. When the body 13 is attached to the barrel 8 it forms, for the purposes of this description, a part of the barrel 8 and in particular defines the forward end 14 of the barrel 8.

The middle or syringe receiving part 2 of the guide 1 has its opening 3 shaped to receive the syringe 6 and hold it steady while permitting easy removal. In the forwardmost part of the syringe receiving opening 3 is a registration shoulder 15, which contacts the forward end 14 of the barrel 8 when the syringe 6 is placed in the guide 1; thus limiting forward movement of the syringe 6. In the rearward part of the syringe receiving opening 3 are flange slots 16 in which flanges 9 resides and which limit rearward movement of the syringe during the loading procedure as described below.

The forward part 4 has a bottle registration shoulder 17 for contacting the top 18 of the medication bottle 7 when the same is inserted in the bottle opening 19.

The incremental loading control part 5 has opposed resilient cantilevered arms 20 and 20a with opposed ribs 21 and 21a thereon. The rib spacings or coarseness is calibrated with the syringe for which it is designed to be used, such that a rib space represents a predetermined amount of fluid in the syringe, as will be more fully understood from the operating instructions. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the ribs 21 and 21a must be in opposed alignment with each other and in operative interference with the path of movement of the knob 11, as will be more evident below.

In operation, a medication bottle 7 is'placed in the bottle opening 19 and into contact with the bottle registration shoulder 17. Then a syringe 6 is positioned generally above the opening 3, and the needle 12 inserted into the medication bottle 7 until the syringe 6 drops into the opening 3. The syringe 6 is then adjusted so that its forward end 14 contacts the forward registration shoulder 15. This establishes a fixed penetration of the needle 12 into the bottle 7 by reason of the distance 22, predetermined to result in the correct depth of penetration.

it is drawn rearward, pulling fluid from the bottle 7 into the syringe 6. As the knob 11, between the fingers of the user, is drawn sequentially over the ribs 21 and 21a, the sense of feel and/or hearing detects the clicks" as each rib pair is passed. Thus by knowing the number of ribs giving the desired dosage, the loading of the syringe may be completed without seeing the scale on the barrel of the syringe.

In FIG. 4 is shown means for more securely and conveniently receiving the medication bottle 7. A support 23 is attached to or integral with the loading guide 1 and has a cavity 24 therein for receiving the bottle 7. A soft pad 25, such as of foam plastic, may be provided for the bottle to rest upon, and may also include an end portion 26 to bia the bottle into contact with the bottle registration shoulder 17.

The guide 1 may be made of metal or plastic or other suitable material and may be constructed in one piece or an assembly of pieces.

FIG. shows an embodiment particulary of the incremental loading control portion. In FIG. 5 a single rib carrying arm 27 is integral with the elongated loop 28 defining the loading control part5. In this form the cantilevered arm 29 serves to bias the plunger knob 11 against the ribs 30 while the latter are relatively solidly positioned. It is also advantageous that the bearing surface 31 of the cantilevered arm 29 extend progressively closer to the ribs, i.e., further into the path of the knob 11; in order to provide a constant biasing force upon the knob 11. This may be done by widening the arm 29 as shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 shows a further embodiment wherein the elongated loop 28 has a rectangular seat 32 in which a removable rib plug 33 is fitted and secured by means such as set screws 34. The rib plug 33 can be made of a variety of materials such as plastic, Teflon being a preferred example.

Various shapes are possible for the ribs as shown in the several figures. In FIG. 5 are shown rectangular ribs; in FIG. I rectangular ribs which are pitched rearward with the forward edge rounded; in FIG. 6 right triangular ribs. The shape of the ribs in FIG. I and especially in FIG. 6 are preferred to permit and assure a single and definitive click as the plunger knob 11 is drawn over it and also to provide smooth action. The preferred rib shapes provide the desired definate movement and also retain the postion of the knob 11 by reason of their shape rather than by having a strong biasing force pushing the knob against the ribs.

It is intended to cover all changes and modifications of the preferred embodiments herein chosen for purposes of the disclosure which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

I. A guide for use with a hypodermic syringe of the type having a barrel; a needle extending from a forward end of the barrel; and a plunger terminating in a knob extending out of the rearward end of the barrel; said guide comprising;

a relatively rigid body structure having three parts;

a middle part having an opening therein for receiving a syringe; a forward part having an opening therein communi- 4 eating with the syringe receiving opening for receiving a medication bottle; means for fixing a predetermined distance between a medication bottle and a syringe when they are received in their respective openings;

a loading control part located rearward of said syringe receiving opening having at least one ribbed member extending rearwardly of said syringe receiving opening and in partial interference with the path of withdraw] movement of the plunger knob of a syringe emplaced in the guide for sequential contact by the plunger knob with the ribs as it is withdrawn; and

means for biasing such a knob against the ribbed member;

whereby a dosage bottle may be emplaced and a syringe inserted into the opening and the needle, be reason of the predetermined distance, inserted the correct distance into the bottle; whereupon the plunger may be withdrawn across a predetermined number of ribs of the ribbed member until a desired amount of fluid is drawn into the syringe; thus permitting a correct dosage to be drawn into the syringe by sensing the passage of the knob across the correct number of ribs.

2. The guide of claim 1 in which the means for fixing a predetermined distance comprises a forwardly located registration shoulder shoulder in the syringe receiving opening and a bottle registration shoulder in the bottle receiving opening.

3. The guide of claim 1 in which the biasing means comprises a second ribbed member, in opposed relationship to the ribbed member and each having opposed ribs.

4. The guide of claim 1 in which the biasing means comprises an arm cantilevered from the body structure and extending generally parallel in opposed relationship to the ribbed member.

5. The guide of claim 1 wherein the loading control part comprises means for detachably receiving the ribbed member.

6. The guide of claim 1 wherein the ribbed member and the biasing means comprise arms cantilevered from the body structure and extending generally parallel to each other in opposed relationship.

7. The guide of claim 5 wherein the loading control part comprises an elongated loop extending rearwardly from the middle part, said loop having an elongated seat therein for receiving a ribbed interchangeable plug.

8. The guide of claim 1 wherein the ribs of the ribbed member have their forward edges relatively rounded and their rearward edges relatively sharp.

9. The guide of claim 1 wherein the guide body structure comprises a template having a thichness, at least in its loading control part, less than the diameter of the knob of the hypodermic syringe.

10. The guide of claim 8 wherin the ribs of the ribbed member are pitched rearward.

11. The guide of claim 1 wherein the ribs are in the shape of a right triangle with the hypotenuse facing forward.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3610241 *Aug 15, 1969Oct 5, 1971Lemarie RomeoSyringe guide and indicator
US3770026 *Sep 17, 1971Nov 6, 1973Isenberg JApparatus and method for accurately loading syringes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3907009 *Oct 15, 1974Sep 23, 1975Dobbins CharlesHypodermic load calibrator
US4018223 *Dec 9, 1974Apr 19, 1977Andros IncorporatedDosage control device
US4098189 *Sep 28, 1976Jul 4, 1978Harry HolmMethod and apparatus for preparing an explosive charge
US4252159 *Apr 2, 1979Feb 24, 1981Maki Eugene BDosage device
US4883101 *Jun 27, 1988Nov 28, 1989Jordan EnterprisesFilling device with sound indicator for filling injection syringe
US4998570 *Nov 22, 1989Mar 12, 1991Pavel Jordan & AssociatesFilling device with sound indicator for filling injection syringe
US5220948 *Aug 7, 1991Jun 22, 1993Habley Medical Technology Corp.Precision syringe-filling mechanism
US5240047 *May 6, 1992Aug 31, 1993Hedges Harry SSyringe guide and bottle holder
US5247972 *Dec 17, 1991Sep 28, 1993Whittier Medical, Inc.Alignment guide for hypodermic syringe
US5279582 *Apr 1, 1992Jan 18, 1994Thomas R DavisonRetractable syringe sheath with bottle engagement
US5377725 *Sep 15, 1993Jan 3, 1995Neff; Charles W.Visual magnification apparatus for a syringe
US5385559 *Dec 20, 1993Jan 31, 1995R. Jason NewsomSyringe filling and metering device
US5894870 *Jun 10, 1997Apr 20, 1999Pharmacia & Upjohn CompanySyringe guide and vial holder
US6364866Jan 22, 1999Apr 2, 2002Douglas FurrSyringe loading aid
US7635344May 21, 2007Dec 22, 2009Hyprotek, Inc.Syringe devices and methods for mixing and administering medication
US7703483Jun 4, 2004Apr 27, 2010Acist Medical Systems, Inc.Peristaltic syringe filling station
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US8002737Sep 30, 2008Aug 23, 2011Hyprotek, Inc.Mixing/administration syringe devices, protective packaging and methods of protecting syringe handlers
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US8220504Mar 9, 2010Jul 17, 2012Acist Medical Systems, Inc.Peristaltic syringe filling station
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US8356644 *Aug 7, 2009Jan 22, 2013Medtronic Minimed, Inc.Transfer guard systems and methods
US8356645Jun 22, 2012Jan 22, 2013Medtronic Minimed, Inc.Transfer guard systems and methods
US8512278Jul 15, 2011Aug 20, 2013Hyprotek, Inc.Mixing/administration syringe devices, protective packaging and methods of protecting syringe handlers
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US20110030845 *Aug 7, 2009Feb 10, 2011Medtronic Minimed, Inc.Transfer guard systems and methods
US20140046380 *Aug 9, 2012Feb 13, 2014Wilson Theophilo AsforaJoint fusion
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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/27, 604/210, 141/95, 604/116
International ClassificationA61M5/178, A61M5/31, A61J1/00, A61J1/14, A61J1/20
Cooperative ClassificationA61J1/2096, A61M2005/3131, A61J2001/201, A61M2205/581, A61M2205/582, A61M5/1782
European ClassificationA61M5/178F