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Publication numberUS3844341 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1974
Filing dateMay 22, 1972
Priority dateMay 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3844341 A, US 3844341A, US-A-3844341, US3844341 A, US3844341A
InventorsJ Bimshas, E Hickey
Original AssigneeUs Navy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotatable finned heat transfer device
US 3844341 A
Abstract
A heat transfer device includes first and second members mounted for continuous relative rotation in either of a clockwise or a counterclockwise direction while maintaining substantially equally sized gaps between a plurality of equally spaced concentric fins which are alternately disposed in overlapping relationship.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 Oct. 29, 1974 Elite Sttes Patet [191 Bimshas, 51', et al.

Kadenacy 60/3966 X Ahlen et al. 165/86 X Allen l65/86 X llll [54] ROTATABLE FINNED HEAT TRANSFER DEVICE [75] Inventors: John Bimshas, Jr., Westwood;

Edward S. Hickey, Dover, both of Mass.

Primary Examiner-Albert W. Davis, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-R. S. Sciascia; Q. E. Hodges e h t m a CV. .lr em M imp D 5 h V. Shm 0 @Ma 8 e w hw a TrN E e n .W S S A l 3 U [22] Filed: May 22, 1972 ABSTRACT [21] Appl. No.: 255,848

A heat transfer device includes first and second members mounted for continuous relative rotation in either of a clockwise or a counterclockwise direction while maintaining substantially equally sized gaps between a plurality of equally spaced concentric fins which are alternately disposed in overlapping relationship.

.LRUS M 8 8 1/31 N41 a6 7 72 l 8 2 7 F R 0 ,6 1 0 m 1 M N 6 67 1 I85 2 8// 6 ZfiW m 13 5 n. 6 n" 1 u" W Th e H .r. n a u w a L h C l0 S wum t u now HF 11 1] 2 00 5 55 l [l [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 Claim, 4 Drawing Figures 2,332,700 lO/l943 Dickson.........................'...l65/86X t v.7 v

PATENTED BUT 2 9 I974 SHEET 1 (If 2 FIG. 2.

PAIENIEUHBI 29 I974 mama! FIG. 3.

FIG. 4.

ROTATABLE FINNED HEAT TRANSFER DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring generally to FIGS. 1-3 and in particular to This invention relates generally to heat exchange deit is shown that the rotatable finned heat vices and in particular to those having a movable heating or cooling surface.

2. Description of the Prior Art Conventionally, when it was desired to transfer heat from a heat source to a relatively rotating heat sink, the only practical means of transferring such heat was through compact high-speed blowers. Although such prior art devices are capable of transferring heat, several disadvantages are connected with their use. For example, blowers consume power and may require special power supplies. Also fan or blower devices can be noisy, induce vibration and generally have a relatively limited life. Furthermore, since thermal-impedance will vary with changes in gas pressure, a blower speed controller must be used to limit the shifting of thermal graclients.

In applications such as the intergimbal assembly of inertial guidance structures, there is a need for a novel heat transfer device to provide a heat transfer path between the relatively rotating gimbals without the undesirable effects of blower devices.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, the present invention provides a device to transfer heat from a heat source to a relatively rotating heat sink. This is accomplished substantially without the disadvantages of the fan and blower devices by providing a first member adapted for connection to a heat source and a second member thermally coupled with the first member and adapted for connection to a heat sink. Each of the members have a plurality of equally spaced fins which are alternately disposed in overlapping relationship to form substantially equally sized gaps therebetween. The first and second members are mounted for continuous relative rotation in either a clockwise or a counterclockwise direction while maintaining the substantially equally sized gaps between the fins.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a heat transfer path between a heat source and a relatively rotating heat sink.

It is also an object of this invention to provide such a heat transfer path having substantially reduced variations in thermal impedance.

Other objects, advantages and novel features of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the invention when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 illustrates a partial cut-away isometric'view of the preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a partial cut-away isometric view of another embodiment;

FIG. 3 illustrates a partial cut-away isometric view of still another embodiment; and

FIG. 4 illustrates an isometric view of an alternat construction of the embodiment of FIG. 2.

fer device of a preferred embodiment of the present invention generally includes a first member 10 adapted for connection to a heat source (not shown). Member 10 includes a plurality of equally spaced concentric fins 12.

A second member 14 is adapted for connection to a heat sink (not shown) and includes a plurality of equally spaced concentric fins 16. The fins l2 and 16 are alternately disposed in overlapping relationship to form substantially equally sized concentric gaps 18 therebetween.

The first and second members 10 and 14, including their respective fins l2 and 16, may be made preferably of aluminum although it is to be understood that any suitable material may be substituted. Grooves 20 of first member 10 and grooves 22 of second member 14 may be preferably machined by the electrical discharge method. The fin diameters are preferably machined to a tolerance of i 0.001 inches each with a resulting radial gap 18 preferred to be of 0.005 to 0.007 inches between overlapping fins 12 and 16.

Members 10 and 14 may be coaxially bearing mounted within their overlapping hubs or cores 24 and 26 respectively and the members may be retained in position by several retention means such as for example snap rings, threaded ring nuts, clamps or the like. In this manner, first and second members 10 and 14 respectively, are mounted for continuous relative rotation in either a clockwise or a counterclockwise direction while maintaining the substantially equally sized gaps l8.

Specifically, the fins of first member 10 and second member 14 as illustrated in FIG. 1, form a plurality of equally spaced concentric cylinders.

In FIG. 2, fins or discs 12a and 16a of first and second members 10a and 14a, respectively, form a plurality of equally spaced parallel discs. Similarly, in FIG. 3 fins or discs 12b of first member 10b and fins or discs 16b of second member 14b form a plurality of equally spaced parallel discs. Also, the device illustrated in FIGS. 2

and 3 have discs angularly disposed with the axis of rotation of the mounted members. However, the discs 12a and 16a of FIG. 2 are right angularly disposed whereas the discs 12b and 16b of FIG. 3 may be dismaximum permissible number of spacers and discs are alternately disposed to overlap and form equal gaps 18a therebetween. Similarly, members 14a and 10a may be retained mounted in rotating relationship by means of threaded ring nuts 36 and 38 or the like. Such a stacked type construction would be substantially more economical to produce and would allow for greater radial misalignments. Any lack of stiffness of the discs such as those shown in FIG. 2 could be increased by resulting conical shaped fins as illustrated in FIG. 3. The device of HG. 3 may be constructed in a manner similar to that described for the device of FIG. 2 however, appropriate parts would necessarily need to be tapered and formed to produce the desired resulting configuration as shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 4 illustrates, parts of the device in a detached relationship to show another possible means of construction which could be used to form an embodiment similar to that of FIG. 2. First member 100 could be machined to form a unit type construction having discs 120. Similarly, second member 140 could be machined in two halves to include fins 16c. Also grove 40 may be provided to accomodate bearing 30. The two halves may then be joined and retained as a unit by screws 42 or the like.

It is further anticipated that, if desired, first and second members and 14 having concentric cylindrical fins l2 and 16 respectively, may be mounted for axial movement to vary the overlapping area of the fins thus providing a variable impedance heat transfer device. Also, to further reduce thermal impedance, a substantially thermally efficient gas such as helium or a liquid could be provided under pressure within the gaps.

The foregoing has described a novel heat transfer device to provide a heat transfer path between a relatively moving heat source and heat sink without the undesirable effects of blower devices.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood that within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

l. A heat transfer device comprising:

a first member adapted for connection to a heat source and having a plurality of equally spaced parallel faced fins;

a second member adapted for connection to a heat sink and having a plurality of equally spaced parallel faced fins alternately disposed in overlapping relationship with the first member fins to form substantially equally sized gaps therebetween;

the fins of the first and second members forming concentric hollow cylinders and being mounted for continuous relative rotation while maintaining the substantially equally sized gaps; and

means providing helium gas under pressure filling said gaps between said fins.

Patent Citations
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US2332700 *Nov 17, 1941Oct 26, 1943Wilburne A DicksonCooling means for catheads
US2579321 *Apr 9, 1948Dec 18, 1951Nina K GuerckenApparatus for producing gas under pressure
US2611248 *May 16, 1951Sep 23, 1952Svenska Rotor Maskiner AbMeans for effecting heat exchange between a rotating solid body and a gaseous medium, particularly for cooling fluid transmissions with rotating casings
US2839268 *Jan 18, 1950Jun 17, 1958Allis Chalmers Mfg CoGas turbine
US3253300 *Jan 31, 1964May 31, 1966Black Clawson CoMixing valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4144932 *Jun 2, 1977Mar 20, 1979Kohler Co.Heat sink for rotating electronic circuitry
US4362149 *Dec 8, 1980Dec 7, 1982Rockwell International CorporationHeat storage system and method
US4397303 *Feb 9, 1981Aug 9, 1983Armco Inc.Heat exchanger for concentrating solar collectors and method for making the heat exchanger
US4448240 *Dec 20, 1982May 15, 1984International Business Machines CorporationTelescoping thermal conduction element for cooling semiconductor devices
US5000254 *Jun 20, 1989Mar 19, 1991Digital Equipment CorporationDynamic heat sink
US5129448 *Sep 29, 1989Jul 14, 1992Rockwell International CorporationLow torque hinged heat transfer joint
US5297617 *Dec 22, 1992Mar 29, 1994Edward HerbertFan assembly with heat sink
US5297623 *Jan 4, 1993Mar 29, 1994Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaHeat exchange apparatus and method for preparing the apparatus
US5335143 *Aug 5, 1993Aug 2, 1994International Business Machines CorporationDisk augmented heat transfer system
US5513697 *Jun 2, 1995May 7, 1996Gudmundsson; BjornMethod and device for transfer of heat
US5787976 *Jul 1, 1996Aug 4, 1998Digital Equipment CorporationFor thermally coupling a heat source to a heat sink
US6081969 *Sep 23, 1998Jul 4, 2000Sony CorporationHinge for electronic apparatus and electronic apparatus equipped with hinge
US6138748 *Nov 14, 1997Oct 31, 2000Digital Equipment CorporationInterleaved-fin thermal connector
US6144123 *Jul 27, 1999Nov 7, 2000H.S.D. S.R.L.Electric chuck
US7836939 *Aug 1, 2007Nov 23, 2010Harris CorporationNon-contacting thermal rotary joint
US7896611 *Jan 3, 2007Mar 1, 2011International Business Machines CorporationHeat transfer device in a rotating structure
US8201616 *Aug 4, 2007Jun 19, 2012Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And TechnologyInstallation fins and installation structure of fins and a heat sink with moving fins inserted between cooling fins
US8228675 *Mar 26, 2010Jul 24, 2012Sandia CorporationHeat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer
US8678075 *Dec 1, 2009Mar 25, 2014Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyHeat exchangers and related methods
US20090199997 *Aug 4, 2008Aug 13, 2009Koplow Jeffery PHeat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer
US20090205807 *Aug 4, 2007Aug 20, 2009Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And TechnologyInstallation fins and installation structure of fins and a heat sink with moving fins inserted between cooling fins
US20100132931 *Jun 24, 2009Jun 3, 2010Shien-Kuei LiawThermal module for light source
US20100170660 *Dec 1, 2009Jul 8, 2010Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyHeat exchangers and related methods
US20110103011 *Aug 13, 2010May 5, 2011Koplow Jeffrey PHeat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer
US20120305224 *Dec 2, 2009Dec 6, 2012Korea Advanced Institute Of Science And TechnologyHeat sink
EP0111709A2 *Nov 3, 1983Jun 27, 1984International Business Machines CorporationTelescoping thermal conduction element for cooling semiconductor devices
WO1992018821A1 *Apr 16, 1992Oct 29, 1992Bjoern GudmundssonMethod and device for transfer of heat or mass
WO2005083784A2 *Jan 4, 2005Sep 9, 2005Anton BreierCooling apparatus
WO2007117194A1 *Apr 5, 2007Oct 18, 2007Eva GudmundssonMethod and means for pumping in heat exchange applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/86, 165/185, 74/5.00R, 165/104.34, 165/DIG.139
International ClassificationF28D11/02, F28D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationF28D11/02, F28D15/00, Y10S165/139
European ClassificationF28D11/02, F28D15/00