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Publication numberUS3844362 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1974
Filing dateMay 14, 1973
Priority dateMay 14, 1973
Publication numberUS 3844362 A, US 3844362A, US-A-3844362, US3844362 A, US3844362A
InventorsElbert K, Gotzmann K, Janssen T
Original AssigneeElbert K, Gotzmann K, Janssen T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boring device
US 3844362 A
Abstract
A device for boring holes or cleaning conduits comprising a body having a front end and a rear end. Forward drive means are provided at the rear end of said body for receiving fluid under pressure from a fluid delivery means. A boring head is rotatably mounted in the body and projects from the front end of the body. The boring head has a boring member at its free end. First passage means are provided in the body for directing fluid to the forward drive means to impart a forward force on the boring head. Second passage means are further provided for directing fluid to a third passage means in the boring head for ejecting fluid tangentially from the boring head to impart a torque to the boring head.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Elbert et a1.

[ BORING DEVICE [76] lnventors: Ketil E. Elbert, 631 Cote St.

Antoine Rd., Westmount, Montreal, Quebec; Theodorus S. T. Janssen, 1317 Lemoine St., Chambly West, Montreal, Quebec; Karl J. Gotzmann, 739 Rue Cartier, Marieville, Quebec, all of Canada [22] Filed: May 14, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 360,114

[52] US. Cl 175/94, 15/104.12, 166/223, I 175/65, 175/422 [51] Int. Cl E2lb 3/12, E21b 7/18 [58] Field of Search 175/67, 94, 100, 107, 422,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,060,929 5/1913 Monberg 175/107 1,766,487 6/1930 Conner 166/223 X 2,340,738 2/1944 Dilley 175/107 X 1 Oct. 29, 1974 2,932,836 4/1960 Pletcher 15/104.12 3,432,872 3/1969 Kirschke.... 15/104.12

3,525,112 8/1970 Masters 15/104.12 3,547,191 12/1970 Malott 166/223 Primary Examiner-David H. Brown 57 ABSTRACT A device for boring holes or cleaning conduits comprising a body having a front end and a rear end. Forward drive means are provided at the rear end of said body for receiving fluid under pressure from a fluid delivery means. A boring head is rotatably mounted in the body and projects from the front end of the body, The boring head has a boring member at its free end. First passage means are provided in the body for directing fluid to the forward drive means to impart a forward force on the boring head. Second passage means are further provided for directing fluid to a third passage means in the boring head for ejecting fluid tangentially from the boring head to impart a torque to the boring head.

5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures BORING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF INVENTION :1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a device for boring holes, cleaning pipes, tubes and which is operated by fluid under pressure.

b. Description of Prior Art Devices for cleaning pipes, using fluid pressure to rotate a cutter, are known as shown, for example, by US. Pat. No. 2,710,980 issued June 2 l, 1955, C. B. Pletcher inventor, and by US. Pat. No. 3,l67,l26, issued Jan. 26, 1965, H. W. Reineke Jr. et al, inventors. These devices, however, have disadvantages. No suitable means are provided for readily adjusting the rotational speed of the cutter to suit different operating conditions. Further, the devices do not have satisfactory forward drive means. US. Pat. No. 2,710,980 attempts to provide a component of force to drive the device forwardly by angling the fluid passages rearwardly. However, the fluid streams emerging from these passages impinge on the cutter member of the device thus providing a rearward force component which substantially negates the forward force component. This type of device could not be utilized for boring holes as the propelling force would not be sufficient to drive the device through a hard surface. This particular device is restricted to cleaning pipes.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION It is a feature of the present invention to provide a device for boring holes or cleaning of the above type which has means for adjusting its forward driving force and torque to suit varying operating conditions.

It is a further feature of the present invention to provide an improved boring device of the above type which can be driven forwardly in a more satisfactory manner and bore through harder obstacles than the prior art.

According to a broad aspect, the present invention provides a device for boring holes or cleaning conduits comprising a body having a front end and a rear end. Forward drive means are provided at the rear end of said body for receiving fluid under pressure from a fluid delivery means. A boring head is rotatably mounted in the body and projects from the front end of the body. The boring head has a boring member at its free end. First passage means are provided in the body for directing fluid to the forward drive means to impart a forward force on the boring head. Second passage means are further provided for directing fluid to a third passage means in the boring head for ejecting fluid tangentially from the boring head to impart a torque to the boring head.

The fluid ejected through the boring head is also directed slightly rearwardly from the boring head, in a direction away from the abrading and/or cutting means. This imparts a further forward force to the boring head to drive it in a forward direction for boring a hole or cleaning a conduit.

Preferably replaceable nozzles are provided in the boring head to direct the fluid tangentially and rearwardly. The nozzles can be changed thus changing the size of the orifices to adjust the speed of the rotation of the head and the speed of forwarddrive depending on the operating conditions encountered.

In addition. one or more passages may be provided in the boring head to direct fluid forwardly of the device. The forwardly directed fluid serves to flush away material and also provides for cooling of the boring head.

The device can also be provided with means for guiding it in a substantially straight line when boring a new hole in the ground. The guiding means can comprise flutes on the body of the device which flutes extend longitudinally of the body and parallel to the rotational axis of the boring head. The diameter of the body would be the same as the head and the flutes guide the device in a straight line.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS The invention will now be described in detail having reference to a preferred embodiment as illustrated by the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal cross-section view of one embodiment of the boring device;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the device taken along line IIII of FIG. 1; FIG. 3 is an end view of the boring device; and FIG. 4 is a partial longitudinal cross-sectional view showing a different embodiment of the head of the boring device.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As shown in the drawings, the device 1 has a main cylindrical shaped body 3 with a forward drive means or member 5 connected at the rear end 7 of the body and receiving means, such as flexible hose 121, for delivering driving fluid to the device 1. A boring head 9, rotated by the driving fluid as will be described, is mounted at the forward end 11 of the body. The boring head 9 comprises an abrading head 13, such as a carbaloid or diamond head, detachably connected to one end of a nozzle carrier head 15. The carrier head 15 has a hollow shaft portion 17. This shaft portion 17 is rotatably mounted within a cylindrical bore 19 in body 3 by a bearing arrangement 21. The bearing arrangement 21 can comprise a set of thrust bearings 23 and a set of roller bearing 25 positioned by suitable spacers 27, 29 and a bearing sleeve 3]. Locking nut 33, threaded on shaft portion 17, and locking nut 35, threaded into body 3 adjacent end 11, maintain the bearing arrangement 21 and nozzle carrier head 15 in position in the body 3.

The end 37 of hollow shaft portion 17 abuts with the thrust drive member 5 at the rear end 7 of body 3. The forward drive member 5 comprises an adapter member 39 having a socket 41 at one endfor snugly receiving the end 37 of shaft portion 17 in a roller bearing 24 positioned inthe socket 41. The member 39 is screwed into a threaded bore 43 in the body 3. A threaded connector portion 45 on member 39 receives the fluid delivery means which is hereinshown in the form of a flexible tube 121.

A passage 47 extends axially through member 39 leading to an axial passage 49 in nozzle carrier head 15.

Two or more transverse fluid passages 26 extend within the member 39 to provide fluid to a respective driving thrust nozzle member 28 threaded within a respective passageway 30 and constitutingthe forward drive means. The nozzle members 28 each have a tapered passage 32 which connects an orifice 34 to a passage 26. The orifice 34 is disposed substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body 3 and faces rearwardly thereof whereby the fluid ejected therethrough will provide a rearward thrust to drive the head 13 forwardly.

Passage 49 further leads to a chamber 53 within the carrier head. The chamber is located in the portion of the carrier head which projects from body 3 and is adjacent the abrasive boring head 13. Threaded passages 55 are provided in carrier head leading outwardly in a tangential manner from chamber 53. Nozzle members 57 are threaded into passageways 55. The nozzle members 57 are bolt-like and have a tapered passage 59 in their threaded body portion 61 which connects chamber 53 with an orifice 63 in the outer end of the nozzle member. Hexagon-shaped heads 65 on nozzle members 57 rest on flat surfaces 67 formed on carrier head 15. The nozzle members 57 are arranged in an annular ring about carrier head 15. While four such nozzle members are shown, more or less can be employed.

Preferably, but not exclusively, the passage 55, in which the nozzle members are threaded, slope slightly rearwardly of the device so that the fluid streams emerging from the orifices 63 are directed in a slight rearward direction, away from the boring head 13 to impart additional forward thrust as well as the torque force to the head 13. The bore head 13 has a threaded shank 69 by which it is detachably connected to carrier head 15. The bore head 13, when the device is used in cleaning, has a diameter less than the interior diameter of the pipe or tube being cleaned and slightly greater than the diameter of the body 3. The front face 71 of the bore head 13 has a shallow conical shape. This face 71 and the circumferential edge 73 on the bore head 13 are coated or covered with suitable abrading and/or cutting means. The abrading and/or cutting means preferably comprises industrial diamonds embedded in a suitable molding matrix, as is well known. Because the rotational speed of the device can operate up to about 14,000 rpm, particularly because of the use of nozzle orifices and high fluid pressure, up to approximately 3,600 p.s.i. the diamonds are embedded in the matrix to a greater depth ranging up to thirteen thousandths of an inch. Because the diamond members can be embedded deeper, they do not readily loosen and come out during use thus increasing the life of the boring head 13.

A central passage 75 may be provided in the head 13 for directing a small proportion of the fluid, directed to chamber 53, axially forwardly from the chamber 53 to cool the head and remove the grounded powder particles when boring.

Suitable O-ring seals 77 can be provided in the device at appropriate locations in the device, as shown, to minimize fluid leakage. A packing assembly 79 is also provided about shaft portion 17, between the bearing arrangement 21 and the drive member 5 to further minimize fluid leakage. The roller bearing arrangement 23, 24 minimizes vibrations in the shaft portion 17 which would damage the packing 79 and seals 77 and cause leakage of the fluid.

in operation, the device is inserted into a bore hole or pipe to be cleaned. Driving fluid, such as water, is then passed, under a pressure herein up to 3,600 p.s.i., through the fluid delivery means, such as a flexible hose connected to the drive member 5, to the passage 47 and from there through passages 26 and to the nozzles 34 to provide the forward thrust or drive for the head. The passage 47 also connects passage 49 to chamber 53. From chamber 53 the fluid passes tangentially outwardly in streams or jets through orifices 63 in nozzle members 57. These streams of emerging water cause the carrier head to rotate thus rotating bore head 13 which is attached thereto. With the streams of water also being directed rearwardly as they emerge from the device, a component of force is provided to assist in driving the device forwardly in the bore hole while the bore head rotates. The rate of rotation, and of forward movement of the device is dependent on the orifice size and the volume of water being pumped to the device at the particular pump pressure. The rate of rotation, and of forward movement, can be further controlled by independently varying the pressure at which the fluid is supplied to the device.

A jet of water may also emerge forwardly of the device through the central passage 75. This water jet serves to flush out the material being ground off by the boring head as it moves through the hole. The water passing through passage also serves to cool the boring head.

In another embodiment of the invention, as shown in FIG. 4, the bore head 101 can be formed with a concentric, cylindrical portion 103 projecting from base 105. The base 105 has a threaded projection 107 for connecting to the carrier head 15. The forward face 109 of portion 103 is made slightly concave to improve the stability and alignment of the head during boring operations. The portion 103 and the base are, as before, covered with a suitable abrading and/or cutting means. At least two passageways 111,113 are provided in the portion 103 extending outwardly to the peripheral edge of face 109 from chamber 53. The passageways may be twenty thousandths of an inch in diameter. The passageways serve to direct jets of fluid to wash away softer material when boring thus increasing the life of the boring head. The water jets also serve to flush away the cut, ground and/or abraded material.

The waterjets also cool the boring head 101 during operation thus further increasing its life.

The boring device, employing either type of bore head 13 or 101, can also be employed to drill new holes in the ground. To direct the boring device in a straight line during this operation the device is connected, at its rear end, by connector portion 45 to a rigid rod-like support member 121 rather than a flexible tube. The driving fluid can be directed through the hollow rod member to the device, or through a flexible tube (not shown) carried in the hollow rod member 121.

In an alternative embodiment, or, in addition to using a rigid rod-like member, the body of the device can be provided with longitudinal flutes 115, as shown in F IG. 3, which extend parallel to the longitudinal and rotational axis of the device. The flutes serve to stabilize the device and guide it in the direction it is started in boring a hole in the ground.

EXAMPLE ameter. The four forward thrust orifices 34 were 1.6 mm. in diameter.

With the above specifications, the device was posi tioned for boring through concrete having a hardness of 7,500 lbs/in and including a granite aggragate of approximately 3 inches min. and reinforced steel bars of 5/8 inch. The device penetrated at a rate of approximately3 inches/min. cutting through the steel bars.

The boring device of the present invention is capable of being operated at extremely high speeds ranging up to 14,000 rpm. Because of the high speeds at which the device can be operated, the abrading and/or cutting means on the bore head, when in the form of industrial diamonds, are embedded in a holding matrix to a greater depth than normal. The diamonds are therefore not as easily knocked loose during use thus increasing the life of the boring head.

The boring device, after completing a cleaning or boring operation, is withdrawn by suitable winch means when using a flexible hose to deliver fluid.

We claim:

1. A device for boring holes through ground comprising a body having a front end and a rear end, a boring head rotatably mounted in the body and projecting from said front end, said boring head having a boring member at its free end, two or more drive jets symmetrically disposed about said body rear end and having an orifice positioned to release fluid pressure axially of said body to impart a forward pressure to said boring head, first passage means for directing fluid through the body to said two or more drive jets, two or more torque generating jets symmetrically disposed about said head and rearwardly thereof, second passage means for directing fluid to said torque generating jets in the boring head for ejecting fluid tangentially from the boring head to impart a torque and a stabilizing forward thrust to said boring head, fluid delivery means connected to the rear end of said body and in communication with said first and second passage means, said drive jets and torque generating jets having an orifice of selected diameter to provide a predetermined rate of rotation and penetration of said boring head at a preselected fluid pressure applied to said first and second passage means and to maintain said body in a substantially straight line of penetration when boring through ground.

2. A device as claimed in claim 1 including fourth passage means in the boring head extending forwardly from the one position through the boring head for directing a small proportion of the fluid forwardly out of the device.

3. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said boring head has a projecting concentric cylindrical portion at its forward end, the front surface of the cylindrical portion being slightly dished, the cylindrical portion along with the forward end of the boring member, carrying abrading material, and at least two passageways leading outwardly to the peripheral edge of the front surface from the one position to direct a small proportion of the fluid forwardly of the device.

4. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said body is of substantially the same diameter as said head and provided with flutes extending along its outer surface in a direction parallel to the axis of rotation of the boring head.

5. A device as claimed in claim 1 wherein said fluid delivery means comprises a flexible tube connected to the rear end of the body.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4031971 *Oct 8, 1976Jun 28, 1977Continental Oil CompanyJet nozzle drilling assembly
US4432423 *Mar 22, 1982Feb 21, 1984Lyons William CApparatus for extended straight line drilling from a curved borehole
US4440242 *Nov 24, 1981Apr 3, 1984Schmidt Bruno HDevice for producing boreholes in coal or the like
US4458766 *Sep 20, 1982Jul 10, 1984Gilbert SiegelHydrojet drilling means
US4475603 *Sep 27, 1982Oct 9, 1984Petroleum Instrumentation & Technological ServicesFor use in the drilling of a well
US4488607 *Sep 27, 1982Dec 18, 1984Petroleum Instrumentation & Technological ServicesSeparator sub with annular flow passage
US4523644 *Oct 27, 1983Jun 18, 1985Dismukes Newton BThermal oil recovery method
US4761039 *Jul 21, 1987Aug 2, 1988Hydro-Ergon CorporationCutting head for removing material with a high velocity jet of working liquid
US4887585 *May 20, 1988Dec 19, 1989Nutt David HMethod and apparatus for cutting taps in sewer lines
US4909325 *Feb 9, 1989Mar 20, 1990Baker Hughes IncorporatedHorizontal well turbulizer and method
US4919204 *Jan 19, 1989Apr 24, 1990Otis Engineering CorporationApparatus and methods for cleaning a well
US4967841 *Feb 9, 1989Nov 6, 1990Baker Hughes IncorporatedHorizontal well circulation tool
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US5771984 *May 19, 1995Jun 30, 1998Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyIn a geological formation by spallation; geothermal
US6470978Dec 15, 2000Oct 29, 2002University Of QueenslandFluid drilling system with drill string and retro jets
US6866106Sep 4, 2002Mar 15, 2005University Of QueenslandFluid drilling system with flexible drill string and retro jets
US7011158Sep 5, 2003Mar 14, 2006Jerry Wayne Noles, Jr., legal representativeMethod and apparatus for well bore cleaning
US7083011Nov 14, 2002Aug 1, 2006Cmte Development LimitedFluid drilling head
US7195082Oct 20, 2003Mar 27, 2007Scott Christopher AdamDrill head steering
US7370710Oct 1, 2004May 13, 2008University Of QueenslandErectable arm assembly for use in boreholes
US7686102Mar 29, 2007Mar 30, 2010Jerry SwinfordJet motor for providing rotation in a downhole tool
US7866922 *Jun 7, 2007Jan 11, 2011Cesare MelegariEquipment and method for constructing micropiles in soil, in particular for the anchorage of active anchors
US8066452Dec 3, 2010Nov 29, 2011Cesare MelegariEquipment and method for constructing micropiles in soil, in particular for the anchorage of active anchors
US8074717 *Aug 1, 2007Dec 13, 2011Shell Oil CompanyDrilling method and downhole cleaning tool
US8151908Dec 4, 2009Apr 10, 2012Jerry SwinfordJet motor for providing rotation in a downhole tool
DE3141855A1 *Oct 22, 1981Jun 3, 1982Woma Maasberg Co Gmbh WNozzle head for attaching to a high-pressure water line
DE3141856A1 *Oct 22, 1981Jun 3, 1982Woma Maasberg Co Gmbh WApparatus for making bore holes in coal
WO1984001188A1 *Sep 19, 1983Mar 29, 1984Siegel GilbertHydrojet drilling means and method
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WO1997021900A1 *Dec 5, 1996Jun 19, 1997Bhp Coal Pty LtdFluid drilling system
WO2003031770A1 *Oct 8, 2002Apr 17, 2003Sprengers JohannesTool for cleaning boreholes
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/94, 166/223, 173/159, 175/65, 15/104.12, 175/424
International ClassificationB08B9/02, E21B10/60, E21B7/18, E21B4/02, E21B4/00, B08B9/04, E21B10/00, E21B37/00
Cooperative ClassificationB08B9/0497, E21B7/18, E21B37/00, E21B4/02, E21B4/00, E21B10/60
European ClassificationE21B37/00, E21B4/00, E21B7/18, E21B10/60, E21B4/02, B08B9/049N2