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Publication numberUS3844557 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1974
Filing dateAug 8, 1973
Priority dateAug 8, 1973
Publication numberUS 3844557 A, US 3844557A, US-A-3844557, US3844557 A, US3844557A
InventorsPompetti J
Original AssigneePompetti J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rocket motor driven model racing vehicle
US 3844557 A
Abstract
A reaction motor driven model racing vehicle having a disposable rocket cartridge as a source of automotive power, incorporated into an extruded molded polypropylene plastic vehicle body with four wheels that are free wheeling, tethered to monofilament plastic lines, driven solely by the model rocket cartridge and guided by the monofilament plastic line to speeds of one hundred and fifty to two hundred miles per hour over distances determined by the thrust of the model rocket engine, utilizing aerodynamic braking in the form of a parasol action parachute, ejected by the model rocket cartridge, rear ward of the vehicle preferably at the end of thrust charge as disclosed herein. Further disclosure of the use of staging in the model racing vehicle engine, wherein two cartridges may be utilized sequentially, for greater distances and speeds or weight, a bypass chamber is disclosed to utilize the expulsion of hot gases at the end of the second stage thrust burning to eject a parasol acting parachute, both disclosures to incorporate wheels that have interchangeable tires for optimum kinetic friction on road bed the model racing vehicles would be raced on.
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United States Patent 1 Pompetti [451 Oct. 29, 1974 ROCKET MOTOR DRIVEN MODEL RACING VEHICLE [76] Inventor: John P. Pompetti, 610 Marshall Rd.,

Brookhaven, Pa. 19015 [22] Filed: Aug. 8, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 386,844

[52] US. Cl 273/86 R, 46/202, 46/206, 102/341, 102/34.4 [51] Int. Cl. A63f 9/14, A63h 17/00 [58] Field of Search 273/86 R, 86 D, 86 E; 46/74 R, 74 A, 74C, 76 A, 202, 206; 102/34, 34.1, 34.2, 34.4, 34.5, 49.3

[56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 2,124,456 7/1938 Smythe 273/86 E 2,398,391 4/1946 Orkin 46/76 A 3,292,302 12/1966 Estes et a1 102/345 X 3,295,249 1/1967 Johnson et a1... 46/202 X 3,510,980 5/1970 Pippin 46/74 R 3,589,055 6/1971 Stormon 46/202 3,719,145 3/1973 Brown et a1. 102/344 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle [57] ABSTRACT A reaction motor driven model racing vehicle having a disposable rocket cartridge as a source of automotive power, incorporated into an extruded molded polypropylene plastic vehicle body with four wheels that are free wheeling, tethered to monofilament plastic lines, driven solely by the model rocket cartridge and guided by the monofilament plastic line to speeds of one hundred and fifty to two hundred miles per hour over distances determined by the thrust of the model rocket engine, utilizing aerodynamic braking in the form of a parasol action parachute, ejected by the model rocket cartridge, rear ward of the vehicle preferably at the end of thrust charge as disclosed herein. Further disclosure of the use of staging in the model racing vehicle engine, wherein two cartridges may be utilized sequentially, for greater distances and speeds or weight, a bypass chamber is disclosed to utilize the expulsion of hot gases at the end of the second stage thrust burning to eject a parasol acting parachute, both disclosures to incorporate wheels that have interchangeable tires for optimum kinetic friction on road bed the model racing vehicles would be raced on.

7 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures ROCKET MOTOR DRIVEN MODEL RACING VEHICLE This invention relates to model racing vehicles and more particularly to model reaction motor driven vehicles configured to provide collective competition or individual time competition in a participating model racing automobile sport.

The embodiment of this invention is disclosed incorporating a model rocket power plant as a source of automotive power, through the use of a single solid fuel cartridge engine or the use of a sequentially operated motor in combination with multiple solid fuel cartridges internal to the model vehicle body and tethered to a long monofilament plastic line or multiple lines, remotely started by electrical means to attain a high rate of acceleration and velocity and upon reaching terminal velocity automatically eject a parachute for aerodynamic braking.

The model reaction motor racing vehicle being reliable, stable and simple whereby the maximum participation and education by the student, experimenter, sportsman or enthusiast may be attained.

The model reaction motor racing vehicle disclosed herein also will enhance the field of model rocketry bringing a new domain of interest to this field. As this device is also economical and lends itself to being provided in kit form for assembly by hobbyists.

As this invention makes possible a newgame sport, the opening of official race tracks could create a national sport and opens new business potential. The rules and regulations for said game sport are disclosed in a subsequent patent application.

Heretofore, the Art of Model Rockerty has been confined to the realm of airborne models of actual space vehicles or missiles. The art presents the maximum educational benefit as well as'entertainment, this can be shown by the papers presented by even fourteen year old children on such subjects as kinematics, aerodynamics, photography, computer technology, and biology to name a few of the sciences written about. The only disadvantage is that when a boy and father have launched several rockets, the boy is usually at an age that he will not pursue further higher aspects of the art.

There have beeninstances where model rocket automobiles have been constructed. The disadvantage being that these cars are so ballasted to attain stability that the speed and distance attained are almost inconsequential.

Making a trade off in weight and balance to attain speed results in the smallest irregularity in a road bed to force to model automobile out of control. This condition results in many forms of failure of control up to and including flying thru the air.

lnstrumentalities of the prior art such as slot car racers utilize a small model automobile that is coupled to a plastic road bed and electrically operated, the electric power being supplied to a small electric motor internal to the automobile the car races around the track following the electrical conductor that is imbedded in the plastic road bed. Power is usually supplied by a power pack comprised of a transformer, rectifier and speed is controlled-by a rheostat. Aside from eventual boredom, the greatest disadvantage to this system is the fact that this system is the fact that this-sport is dependent on the track and is almost always indoors.

There is also a radio controlled model automobile utilizing a reciprocating gasoline engine, radio transmitter with proportional control moving the steering system and controlling the throttle on the model automobile. This device aside from being very expensive is also beyond the scope of the average early teenage boy to handle or steer.

It can be shown that the enthusiasts of long standing are those that utilize the reciprocating gasoline engine model as the growling sound of the motor gives considerable satisfaction to the owner of this type of vehicle ascompared to a silent electric motor drive.

The dynamic performance of this invention will also create sound and give considerable auditory satisfaction.

It is accordingly an object of this invention, to provide a new and novel model racing vehicle, with guidance that will allow maximum participation by sportsmen, enthusiasts, and hobbyists, substantially simulating the dynamic performance of the parent vehicle, with realism, reliability in competition, ruggedness and safety.

Another object of this invention is to provide a plastic monofilament tetherline that will interface the model racing vehicle to allow a multiplicity of model racing vehicles to have guidance direction and shock absorbing equalization over the course the model racing vehicle will traverse.

A further object of this invention is to provide a model racing vehicle that will use a reaction motor power system.

Another object of this invention is provide a model racing vehicle that will use a commercially available disposable cartridge model rocket engine.

A still further object of this inventionis to provide a new and improved cartridge type model rocket engine that will trigger a sequentially charged staging motor mount and offer immediate release of a parachute compatable with the model racing vehicle.

Another object of this invention is to provide a parachute release mechanism for realistic aerodynamic braking of the model racing vehicle.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and unique means of parachute deployment creating a drogue function for all forms of rocket vehicles and especially compatible with model racing vehicles.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a means of utilizing more than one disposable cartridge type model rocket engine sequentially ignited with or without time delay between ignitions and also provide parachute ejection force when installed in any model rocket vehicle.

Another objectof this invention is to provide a recessed molded plastic wheel with interchangeable rubber treads to interface various road beds used as the racing course for the model racing vehicle.

With these and other objects and advantages in view, the invention consists of the new and novel combination and arrangements of parts as herein after more fully described, set forth in the claims appended here to and disclosed in the accompanying drawings forming part herof wherein. I

FIG. 1 is a prespective view of the start of a model car race incorporatingthis invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the finish of a model car raceincoporating this invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective section of a rear view of one embodiment of this invention in the basic form showing the reaction motor driven vehicle.

FlG. 3A is a longitudinal sectional view of the basic reaction motor cartridge holder and parachute chamber disclosing the model rocket cartridge, holder and parachute chamber, configured for ignition.

FIG. 4 is a sectional side view delineating the preferred embodiment of this invention in the form of a multiple cartridge reaction motor driven vehicle.

FIG. 5 is a rear plan sectional view of the embodiment in FIG. 4 with the right rear and front wheels removed to show the mechanism that programs the sequential mode of operation for multiple cartridges.

FIG. 5A is a plan sectional view of the right front wheels disclosing the interchangeable tread that is typical for all four wheels.

FIG. 5B is an elevated section view of the force balance mechanism.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a unique braking parachute enabling epitomical performance in the reduction of this invention to a practice complementing the cartridge reaction motor drive.

FIG. 6A is a perspective view of the braking parachute and is presented folded for insertion.

FlG. 6B is a perspective view of the parachute fully deployed.

Refering to the drawing FIG. 1 in detail shows a model automobile race as conceived by the inventor.

The model reaction motor driven racing vehicle 1 as shown after ignition of the reaction engine 2 the model reaction motor driven racing vehicle 1 is tethered to a monofilament plastic line of approximately fifty thousands of an inch diameter by means of snap swivel locking device 5 on the monoline 4 and eye fasteners 3 two in number located on either side of the racing vehicle 1 as hereinafter referred to the location of the eye fastener 3 may be located behind the front wheel and in front of the rear wheel of the racing vehicle 1. This will be further delineated in FIG. 3. The reaction engine shown in this configuration is the toy rocket cartridge type providing between 12 and 38 newtons of thrust and is constituted of three pyrotechnic charges, one for thrust, one for variable delay and one for percussion. The thrust developed by this cartridge lasts for one and a quarter to one and a half seconds. The time delay is selectable from 2 seconds to 7 seconds and the percussion charge occurs at the end of the delay and is used for a parachute ejection, this engine is commercially available and is state of the art.

The exhaust thrust gases accelerate the racing vehicle 1 to a terminal velocity of 150 to 200 miles per hour dependent upon the mass of the racing vehicle and the kinetic friction of the wheels with relation to the road surface of the race track.

There are three racing vehicles 1 shown in FIG. 1. All are tethered to individual monofilament lines 4. The length of the monofilament lines 4 may be as long as 1000 feet and are tested for a strength of at least 50 pounds rupture strength. The tension of the lines are not critical. They are adjusted to a taut condition and as long as they are straight, the monofilai'nent lines 4 may come in contact with the road bed with no degradation in performance. The purpose of the monofilament plastic line 4 herein after referred to as monolimes is manifest in this mode of operation. Primarily the mono-line 4 provides directional stability for the racing vehicle in a manner that will prevent damage to the racing vehicle 1.

Multiple vehicle racing as compared to elapsed time racing is accomplished by means of the boom 7 shown wherein the mono-lines 4 are individually secured, with snap swivels 5 trolleyed, to an individual eye fastener 6 shown as three in quantity on the front of the boom 7. The number of mono-lines 4 is dependent upon the length of the boom 7 and the size of the racing vehicle 1. The racing vehicles 1 shown as reduced in practice and the boom 7 have a five inch wide wheel base for the racing vehicle 1 and 36 inches length for the boom 7 respectively. The boom 7 is preferably extruded plastic or wood and is guyed by means of a short length of mono-line 4A and eye fasteners 6 one each in number located at the end of the rear of the booms 7. The center of the guy line 4A is secured to the eye fastener 6 on the top of the fixed guy post 9 preferably wood and pulled to exert tension on the mono-line 4 of the boom 7 and the tether mono-lines 4 to which the racing vehicles l have been trolleyed. -lt is pertinent that the mono-line 4 may be lifted from the road bed and the snap swivels 5 threaded through the racing vehicle 1 eye fasteners 3 without getting on ones knees. The method of attachment does not preclude the use of a smaller snap swivel 5 being threaded on the line and then attached to the eye fastener 3 at the racing vehicle body.

The terminating end of the racing course is the same as the starting end and is located in a straight line mode over the desired distance from the starting end. The terminating end of the race is depicted in FIG. 2 wherein the parachute 12 has been deployed. The sequence of operation is as follows:

After ignition, the three racing vehicles 1 are subjected to an acceleration for approximately one and one-half seconds, then a plume of smoke for approximately two, three, or four seconds dependent upon the cartridge selected streams rearward and at the end of this delay a percussion gas charge that deploys the parachute 12, the distance covered during the period up to deployment of the chute may be as high as six or seven hundred feet, the parachute 12 then deploys and the shroud lines 11 secured to the racing vehicle 1 produce an aerodynamic braking. The sequence having performed perfectly is all a rather dynamic and realistic event.

The deployment of the parachute l2 advances the state of the art and is constructed and packed in a truly unique manner which will be described in a further embodiment of the invention.

As stipulated previously, it is not essential to employ the parachute for braking purposes. A stopping effect is also derived by the means of a soft rubber grommet 8 shown secured in the mono-line 4. The grommet 8 also will prevent the racing vehicle 1 from crashing into the boom 7 and dependent upon the force at the momment of impact of grommet 8 and racing vehicle 1, the racing vehicle will ricochet back along the mono-line 4 in the reverse direction previously travelled.

The perspective sectional view at FIG. 3 is the first generation embodiment of the model reaction motor driven vehicle 1 and depicts the rocket motor holding mounting 2. The racing vehicle 1 as again hereinafter referred to. is comprised of a body 13 preferably injection molded resilient plastic such as polypropylene configured as a sport car racer, eye fasteners 3 are shown opposite to the previous design to demonstrate universal mounting on the side of the body 13. The four wheels 14 may be rotated on individual axles or paired axles and are free wheeling.

The reaction motor mount 2 is comprised of a parachute chamber 15 rectangular box like in configuration, a cylindrical tube 16 to receive the toy cartridge rocket motor. Although shown as plastic, both sections may be comprised of a Kraft Paper aluminum foil covered on the internal structure of the mounting chamber 16 and parachute chamber 15. A retaining spring 17 is used to hold the toy cartridge rocket motor in the cylindrical tube 16 and is secured by means of the external thrust ring 18 also Kraft Paper wound and a thin cross section Kraft Paper wound ring 19. The cylindrical motor mount 16 is made integral to the parachute chamber 15. Adhesive is used as in the art of model rocket construction or this assembly may be made of molded plastic. The embodiment is shown as in the art of model rocket construction.

The cylindrical tube 16 presents an open end to the rear of the racing vehicle 1 to receive the rocket cartridge. The rectangular tube 15 also presents an open end to the rear of the racing vehicle 1 to eject the parachute. The front end of both the cylindrical motor mount 16 and the rectangular parachute chamber 15 are secured and gas sealed to the bulkhead 21 which in turn is secured by fasteners to the body 13 of the racing vehicle 1. A length of glass reinforced adhesive tape 20 covers both sections over the bypass vent located internal to the two sections to reinforce the bonding agent which is preferably a plastic wood filled water soluble polyurethane cement, that also acts as a gas seal. FIG. 3A is a sectional longitudinal elevated view of the reaction motor mount and parachute chamber showing the internal structure. It is as in the embodiment of FIG. 3 comprised of the rocket cartridge tube 16 stop 17, parachute chamber 15 bulkhead 21.

Internally located in the cylindrical tube 16 is the rocket cartridge and the internal thrust ring 24. This prevents the cartridge 25 from moving forward under thrust after ignition and transfers the thrust to the racing vehicle.

The ring 24 is annular in construction and allows the percussion charge gases to pass thru into the forward section at the cylindrical tube 16 wherein a vent into the lower parachute chamber 15 is located. This plenum chambered section also contains a length of aluminum screening 23 covering the vent over the parachute chamber 15 and acts as heat sink to the gases.

The expanding gases build up the pressure in this vented chamber and push against the wadding 28 which expels the parachute 12 out of the rear of the chamber 15. The shroud lines 11 are secured to a shock cord 27 which is preferably woven elastic fabric and this in turn is fastened to the bulkhead 21 by means of an eye fastener 26 or other means. Holding block 22 is used to adhesively bond the cylindrical tube 16 to the bulkhead 21 and the parachute chamber 15 is adhe sively bonded to the full length of the cylindrical tube l6 and both chambers 15 and 16 project out of the rear of the racing vehicle.

The necessity for a model rocket cartridge with zero time delay, between thrust termination and percussion, can be satisfied by the cartridge shown in FIG. 3A. The

inventor wishes to disclose the structure of such a model rocket cartridge 25 and not the ingredients of pyrotechnic charges as these are state of the art. The structure however is obviously an advance on the art. The cartridge 25 consists of a rear exit nozzle 25A, which provides means for ignition and gas exhaust of the thrust charge 258, the exit nozzle 25A is a refractory material sealed to a heavy wall Kraft Paper tube 25C. The thrust charge is ported into the nozzle and is a loosely packed charge. The burning time is on the order of one to one and a half seconds in this instance. The percussion charge 25D is located at the far end of the cartridge 25 as the thrust charge burns to the percussion charge 25D, the percussion charge detonates generating force and hot gases sufficient to rupture the end refractory seal 25E that is also sealed to the internal wall of the cartridge 25. The end refractory seal 25B is of thin cross section, adequate for strength to retain the charges 25C and 25D, but sufficiently thin to fragmentate and to allow a very high temperature in the air space remaining at the end of the cartridge 25. One will note that there is no delay charge and the air space is utilized for insertion of a quanidine-sulfate fuse when the cartridge is used for staying purposes.

FIG. 4 is a sectional sideview of a two step sequentially ignited model reaction motor driven racing vehicle l configured as a formula one racer.

The racing vehicle is comprised of a body 13 of polypropylene plastic with appurtenances 33 to simulate the parent racing car. To the body 13 as before are attached the four free wheeling wheels 14. The construction of the wheels are detailed at a further point. The reaction motor mount 2 is configured as before in FIG. 3A. There are, however, certain and novel embodiments to this configuration that present a unique and thrilling spectacle when racing. The reaction motor mounting tubes are capable of holding two rocket cartridges 25. The first cartridge being ignited at the start of the race and the second cartridge being ignited while the racing vehicle is in motion. The first ignited cartridge 25 burns its internal thrust charge off in one and one half seconds. The time delay charge is very short or non-existent. One second at the most is required in this cartridge. The percussion charge is as before providing hot gases for parachute ejection. However, in this invention, the gases are also used to ignite a 500 milli-second time delay quanidinesulfate fuse 29. The I fuse 29 is inserted into the second stage toy rocket reaction engine 25A prior to insertion in the cylindrical motor tube 16. It will be noted that the retaining spring 17 has been replaced, by a balanced counter force mechanism. This will be disclosed in FIG. 5 and 5B.

The cylindrical motor tube 16 has been lengthened to accomodate the two cartridges 25 and 25A and a compression spring 32. The compression spring 32 will store a force of 32 to 48 ounces when compressed and will be held under compression by an equal force applied to the two cartridges 25 and 25A. Upon the termination of the first percussion charge in cartridge 25, the second cartridge 25A will travel to the rear orifice of the cylindrical motor tube 16 taking the spatical location of the previous ignited cartridge and here the sec-- ond cartridge will ignite and develop a further thrust to keep the racing vehicle 1 moving. The total sequence is as follows:

Cartridge 25A has the quanidine-sulfate fuse 29 inserted into the rear of the cartridge. The separation washer 30 is used to prevent any hot particles from prematurely reaching the ignition orifice on cartridge 25A. The locking mechanism 34 shown in FIG. 5 is pulled away from the body 13 of the vehicle and rotated to remain in a drawn position. The arrows indicate the direction. The mechanism comprises a rotatable flat end key shaft 38 shouldered to retain a thrust washer 37. Coaxially located around the shaft 38 is a compression spring 36 which bears against another thrust washer 35 and passes thru the body 13 of the vehicle. The shaft is preferably made of epoxide laminated fiberglass plastie, a fire resistant frangible material. A plastic reinforcing boss 39 is cemented to the Kraft Board tube for strength. If the motor mount is extruded plastic, this may be eliminated. The compression spring 32 is secured to the bulkhead 21 toward the front of the vehicle and the opposite end of the compression spring 32 is terminated in a C-shaped annular ring 24 which takes the place in principle of the internal thrust ring previously delineated. The C thrust ring 24 is non-rotatable and is mounted to allow the keyed shaft 38 of the stop mechanism 34 to pass thru the wall of the cylindrical tube 16 and act as a thrust stop for the second stage rocket cartridge 25A when it is ignited. The rocket cartridge 25A is then inserted into the cylindrical chamber 16 by using ones hand and retracting the counterforce spring mechanism 40 with the other hand. The second cartridge 25B is also inserted. This is the first cartridge to be ignited. Pushing the second cartridge 25B into the chamber 16 compresses the traverse compression spring 32 shown in FIG. 4. Releasing the counter force mechanism 40 to allow it to return then holds both cartridges in the cylindrical motor mount 16. The stop mechanism 34 is then rotated back to the vertical positron.

The parachute 12 as shown in the chamber of FIG. 4 has been folded longitudinally along the internal vinyl staves shown in FIG. 6, 6A and 6B. The shroud lines 11 are attached to the shock or bungee cord 27 which is secured to the bulk head 21 by means of fastener 26. A patch of wadding 28 is inserted first and pushed to the rear of the chamber slightly. The longitudinally packed chute 12 and lines 11 are inserted line end first into the chamber 15, and both wadding 28 and shroud lines 11 are forced to the front proper location by the internal polyvinyl staves of the parachute 12 which are sufficiently rigid to provide an easy packing and will locate the wadding 28. The closed end of the parachute 12 is pushed about one half inch into the parachute chamber 15 rear orifice. The purpose of each element is as follows:

The rocket cartridge 25B will provide thrust to drive the vehicle for one and one half seconds at the end of this time, the delay charge of one half to one second will allow the vehicle to coast. The end of the delay charge sets off the percussion charge in the cartridge 253. The percussion charge hot gases ignite the quanidine sulfate fuse 29 as this was self-aligned into the sealed end of the cartridge 25A when loaded. The separation washer 30 and plug 31 prevent the charge from igniting 25A directly at the same instant of percussion of the first cartridge 25B. The cartridge 25B starts to eject from the chamber 16 because of recoil. The cartridge 25B overcomes the counter force mechanism 40 restraint and as the cartridge 25B moves out of cylindrical chamber 16 the fuse 29 is ignited in cartridge 25A and cartridge 25A is moved to the rear orifice of the cylindrical tube mount 16 by means of the release of energy in the compression spring 32 which produces a rapid traverse of cartridge 25A. The first cartridge 258 has now cleared the vehicle 1 and the counterforce mechanism 40 having opened now closes retaining the second cartridge 25A in the rear orifice where the second cartridge 25A is ignited by the fuse 29. It becomes apparent that the second cartridge 25A is stopped from going back up the cylindrical tube 16 when it developed its thrust by virtue of the key mechanism 34 sliding into the cylindrical tube 16 as shown in FIG. 5. The vehicle continues to move as before accelerating again. At the end of one and one half seconds, the percussion charge of the second cartridge 25A forces both wadding 28 and parachute 12 from the parachute chamber 15 braking the racing vehicle 1 aerodynamically slowing it to a stop.

The operation of the counter force mechanism 40 in FIG. 5 and 5B is based on the following parameters. The force exerted by the compression spring with two cartridges 25B and 25A inserted in the cylindrical tube 16 is on the order of 32 ounces in magnitude. The force exerted by the counter balance mechanism 40 is on the order of 48 ounces as determined by the torsion spring 40B in FIG. 5B. The frame of the force balance mechanism 40A is secured to the body 13 of the vehicle at the rear by an eyelet 41. The lever 40D imparts the force required to the edge of the cartridges 25B and 25A. During thrusting, this force is extraneous upon percussion via no time delay and discounting recoil which is an assist gas pressure in the chamber builds up to 32 pounds pressure per square inch easily. This overcomes the balance exerted by the mechanism 40 and ejection is very rapid in the rearward direction as the force on the lever 40D pushes it completely out of the way for spent cartridge 25B ejection.

In airborne vehicles this type of model parachute deployment is readily accomplished by virtue of the fact that an airborne vehicle may spin fall for several hundred feet before the parachute opens. In this invention a method of forcing a rapid deployment is essential. It is rather disheartening to have a parachute eject and then drag along the road bed. The parachute 12 as shown in FIG. 6 is simple yet effective. A series of three polyvinylchloride plastic staves 42 approximately 32 mils thickness and 250 mils wide are fastened to the parachute canopy 12 with paper adhesive discs 43. The canopy material being of one or two mils thickness polyethylene or Mylar plastic sheet hexagonal in shape, six inches per side and twelve inches overall diameter, in the preferred embodiment of the canopy, is readily receptive to this type of assembly. The same discs are used to attach the shroud lines 11. The staves terminate approximately one inch inside the canopy from the shroud line point of attachment. The staves have the unique characteristic of imparting a memory to the canopy 12 of the parachute. The memory is such as to return the parachute canopy 12 to the open form after being folded longitudinally as shown in FIG. 6A. The rectangular chamber 15 allows the loose longitudinal fold gathered roughly pleated to be inserted without restraint. The insertion is shroud lines 11 first as they are attached to the shock cord 27. The apex of the canopy 12 is slightly inside the parachute chamber 15 rear orifice and as a result the staves 42 force the canopy 12 to billow very quickly when ejected from the parachute chamber 15 by the percussion charge of the rocket cartridge A. it is extremely difficult if not impossible to attain deployment in the mode of operation disclosed herein without this simple memory system.

The wheels 14 of the racing vehicle are typical of the view shown in FIG. 5A. The delineated view is the right front wheel removed with part of the axle 14C attached. The wheel proper 14B is polyvinylchloride molded plastic and may be electroplated to simulate the metal wheels normal to this type of model. As a high factor of kinetic friction is necessary to the reliable operation of the model racing vehicle. The wheel 14B is molded in such a manner as to be hollow in the internal circumference, the thin wall outer periphery is also recessed toward the center and a thickness of 62 mils for the rim provides adequate strength. The circumferential breadth of the wheel 14B is molded with six to eight small diameter port holes passing through to the hollow internal area of the wheel. The wall thickness of the recessed peripheral breadth is on the order of 62 mils or more. The purpose of the port holes is to provide a means of securing the molded rubber treaded tire 14A which has been molded with a complementary set of internally protruding rubber ball pointed or elliptically shaped protrusions on the internal diameter of the tire. The locking action is derived when the tire band 14A is expanded and forced around the wheel MB. The advantage here is that all four tires may be changed quickly and tires of different tread and durometer rubber may be used to optimize kinetic friction for the road bed raced on. The treads can be slicks of low durometer rubber or deep cut treads fortrue simulation. The ignition system may be that used in the state of the art presently comprising a battery and switch with a nichrome wire as in ignition. A preferred method of ignition is recommended in the inventors patent application comprising a hand actuated magneto and flash igniter. The invention disclosed also may be configured with the cold type engine utilizing trichloromonofluromethane.

While I have described my invention embodied i two specific forms and as operating in'a specific manner for purposes of illustration, it should be understood that i do not limit my invention thereto, since various modifications will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of my invention the scope of which is set forth in the annexed claims.

i claim:

1. in a model racing vehicle comprising a vehicle body, front and rear free running wheels supported by said body, said body having a cylindrical reaction engine mount with a rear facing cylindrical orifice into which a model cartridge reaction engine is inserted, means for retaining said engine comprising an internal cylindrical annular section, of lesser overall diameterthan the aforementioned cylindrical engine mount, as a forward fixed stop to transfer thrust from the aforementioned model cartridge reaction engine in the forward acceleration mode attained after ignition, and a fixed retaining means extended beyond the rear cylindrical orifice as a rear recoil stop, the aforementioned cylindrical reaction type engine mount having a gas seal forward of the annular cylindrical section, the forward section comprising at least one fourth or more the total length of cylindrical reaction engine mount having a gas seal and being secured to a front bulkhead, said forward section comprising a plenum, said plenum containing a heat absorbing screen covered port, said screen covered port allowing relatively high pressure and hot gases to enter a second chamber, said second chamber being gas sealed to the aforementioned bulkhead and gas sealed around the screen covered port entrance of the first chamber, said second chamber comprising a fastening means forward of the screen covered port entrance to which is secured a short length of bungee cord, said cord being tied to shroud lines, said shroud lines terminating in a sheet plastic parachute, said parachute having means for creating memory, said means allowing immediate billowed deployment rearward upon ejection from the aforementioned second chamber, said means for immediate deployment being enhanced by the method of insertion, geometry of the second chamber and the packing of the parachute, in the second chamber, said method of insertion being further comprised of a. small piece of wadding inserted into the second chamber prior to insertion of the parachute, secured by the shroud lines and bungee cord to the aforementioned bulkhead, said wadding filling the second chamber width and height and pushed forward to a point rearwardly of the aforementioned heat absorbing screened port said parachute being gathered longitudinally, in the direction of the memory means used for deployment, as one long pleated gathering with shroud line and inserted first following and pushing the wadding forward until only the apex of the parachute can be seen rear ward in the second chamber, said second chamber being rectangular in shape or a geometry allowing a loose but compact insertion of said parachute. v

2. in a model racing vehicle as set forth in claim 1, means for attaching said model racing vehicle to a guidance line embodied as a monofilament plastic line, said means being eye fasteners attached to the vehicle body on either vertically formed side, said monofilament plastic line passing through the eye fasteners and being attached to a guy post at the start end and tensioned to a second guy post at some distance straight in line of sight remote from the first guy post to provide guidancefor the model racing vehicle,

3. in a model racing vehicle as set forth in claim 1, means for attaching said model racing vehicle to a guidance line embodied as a monofilament plastic line, said means being eye fasteners secured to the vehicle body, on either vertically formed side, said guidance line passing through the eye fasteners, said monofilament plastic line being multiplied in number to, provide guidance and direction for a multiplicity of model racing vehicles each on its individual monofilament plastic line as attached in the first said model racing vehicle, said guidance lines being individually attached in parallel to a horizontial boom at the starting end and terminated at some distance in a similar configuration boom at the finish end of the racing course, said boom being secured to a guy post, under tension to maintain the multiplicity of parallel guidance lines taut'over the distance the competing model racing vehicles will traverse, said tautness assuring wheel to surface bearing contact and equalization to allow freedom of motion of the model racing vehicle vertically for portions of an inch equalizing any small irregularities in the road bed.

4. in a model racing vehicle as set forth in claim 1, a solid fuel rocket cartridge comprised of nozzle, casing, and end seal, said casing containing a percussion charge forward of a thrust charge, said percussion charge to be activated immediately upon termination of said thrust charge, said percussion charge to deploy the parachute with no time delay at the end of combustion of the thrust charge, said solid fuel rocket cartridge to develop thrust, said percussion charge to be capable at igniting a time delay fuse when said fuse is inserted in the forward section of the percussion ruptured end seal, said solid fuel rocket cartridge being capable of use as a single stage cartridge or a sequential prime mover for ignition of multiple staging.

5. In a model racing vehicle as set forth in claim 1, said wheels being molded plastic, said plastic molding to be recessed on the circumferential surface, said surface recessed to accept molded rubber treads, said rubber treads of low durometer, and molded in one piece as an annular ring, said annular ring to be treaded in a manner to be compatible on the road bed of the racing course used, said annular treading to range from a slick to a deep dirt tread, on the external surface of the annular ring, said annular ring interface surface to be smaller in diameter than the aforementioned molded plastic wheel, to assure compression when installed, and means to prevent dismemberment at high velocity, said means to be in the preferred embodiment molded internal projections, four to six in number and ball ended cylinders, said projections to key into the recessed molded plastic wheels wherein holes have been provided to accept the spherical ball ends securely retaining the annular rubber ring over the circumference of the surface of the wheel while in motion, said annular rubber ring being easily interchanged when desired for racing conditions.

6. In a model racing vehicle as set forth in claim 1, a parachute, said parachute to be comprised of one to two mil thickness sheet plastic, said sheet plastic to be polyethelene or Mylar hexagonal in shape, six inches length per side and twelve inches over all diameter in the preferred emobdiment of the canopy, said canopy to have six light shroud lines, said shroud lines to be attached to the six points of the canopy with adhesive backed paper discs or tabs, said canopy to have three plastic memory staves and staves to be a nominal width, a preferred length and a preferred thickness, said length, width, thickness and plastic material determining the memory, said staves being attached in the center of the canopy by means of an adhesive backed paper disc, and each extremity to be attached toward a shroud line point for six points with an adhesive backed paper disc, said stave ends terminating one inch inside the canopy from the shroud line point of attachment, said staves being spread wide and retaining an open canopy, said shroud lines being gathered to a point and tied, said tied point being attached to a short length of compliance shock cord, said canopy being folded longitudinally from apex to shroud line end maintaining the folded mode by restrictive means, said means in this embodiment being the parachute chamber of the aforementioned vehicle and returning to a billowed geometry as soon as the restriction is removed producing the function known as drogue.

7. In a model racing vehicle comprising a guidance system, a vehicle body, front and rear free running wheels supported by said body, said free running wheels having interchangeable rubber treads, said body having a cylindrical chamber sufficient in length to receive two disposable cartridge rocket engines and containing a compression spring, said compression spring being in the forward section of the aforementioned cylindrical chamber, said chamber front end being gas sealed and secured to a bulkhead and the front end of said compressor spring being fastened coaxially to the bulkhead, internal to said cylindrical chamber, said chamber having a forward section which is equal to at least fifty percent the length of one disposable cartridge, acting as a plenum with a heat absorbing screen port passing into a second rectangular chamber being gas sealed and integral part of the first cylindrical chamber, said area acting as a storage area for the compression spring under compression and also as a plenum when the compression spring is expanded to allow hot gases to flow with force into the second chamber, said compression spring to have attached to the rear unanchored end an annular C-shaped ring movable with contraction and expansion of the compression spring acting as a thrust ring when the cylindrical chamber has two cartridge rocket engines inserted, and as a moving piston during staging, and as a port after expansion at the compression spring at final stage deployment of wadding end a parachute, allowing hot gases to pass into the forward plenum through the aforementioned screened port into the second rectangular chamber, said compression spring to be fully compressed and retained in compression by two cartridge rocket engines inserted and held in place by a spring loaded rear retention plate secured to the rear of the body of the vehicle in a manner to exert a counter balancing force equal to the opposing force of the compression spring located forward at the first inserted cartridge rocket engine in the aforementioned cylindrical mount, thereby holding both cartridge engines in the cylinder until the first ignited engine activates its percussion charge whereupon the first ignited engine will recoil out of the cylindrical chamber, and at the same time having means to delay ignition, the first inserted model rocket engine which by action of the compression spring being unloaded will move to the first occupied most rear position and by means of said delay, ignition will take place, means being provided to contain the second ignited cartridge rocket engine during thrusting from going forward against the C-shaped plunger and compression spring, said means being a flat key shaped plunger attached to and thru the side of the model racing vehicle body resting with force against a slotted section of the cylindrical motor mount said force being applied by a coaxial compression spring around the shaft of the flat key portion that is released when the end of the second model rocket engine passes the key slot in the cylindrical mount passing into the chamber at the point that is the open segment of the C thrust ring, said flat key acting as a stop for the final cartridge rocket engine while activated with forward directing thrust, continuing to transfer thrust to the vehicle body and at the time of activation of percussion charge in the aforementioned second model rocket engine allowing hot gases to pass by said flat key C thrust ring and opened compression spring into the aforementioned plenum port chamber and into the parachute chamber ejecting and deploying both the aforementioned wadding and parachute out of the rear of the model racing vehicle.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/58, 102/351, 446/51, 102/348, 446/444
International ClassificationA63H18/02, A63F9/14, A63H18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/14, A63H18/021
European ClassificationA63F9/14, A63H18/02B