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Publication numberUS3844558 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1974
Filing dateJun 19, 1973
Priority dateJun 19, 1973
Publication numberUS 3844558 A, US 3844558A, US-A-3844558, US3844558 A, US3844558A
InventorsV Gigliotti
Original AssigneeV Gigliotti
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf game apparatus
US 3844558 A
Abstract
A golf game wherein a driven golf ball rebounds from a vertically extending target panel having nine numbered target areas onto a putting area. The tee area has nine numbered tee positions and may be in the form of a grooved ramp which is inclined upwardly toward the target panel and has a progressively changing thickness from the first to the ninth tee position. The putting surface includes nine numbered ball receiving cups, each of which may be closed by a plug having an extracting bar spanning a concave cavity in the upper surface thereof.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Siates Patent 1191 Giglioiti 1451 Oct. 29, 1974 i GAME APPARATUS FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS l l lnvemorl Victor J Gigliofli 220 Crystal -4 251,046 4/1926 Great Britain 273/87 c N w L nd C n. 063 707,825 4/1931 France 273 176 F [22] Filed: June 19, 1973 Primary Exammer-George J. Marlo PP 371,415 Attorney, Agent, or FirmClarence A. OBrien;

Harvey B. Jacobson [52] US. Cl 273/87 R, 273/176 F, 273/195 R, 273/34 B, 273/183 A [57] ABSTRACT Cl. A game wherein a driven rebounds from Fleld of Search 87, 87.2, a vertically extending target panel having nine num- 273/37-45 202, 5 181, 182, 34, 195, 133 bered target areas onto a putting area. The tee area has nine numbered tee positions and may be in the References Cited form of a grooved ramp'which is inclined upwardly to- UNITED STATES PATENTS ward the target panel and has a progressively changing 1,012,820 12/1911 Cory 273/176 thickness from the first the ninth 166 Position 1,391,306 9/1921 Eliaser 1 273/874 putting surface includes nine numbered ball receiving 1,469,130 9/1923 Whitehair 273/176 B cups, each of which may be closed by a plug having an 1,582,237 4/1926 Angell 273/176 F extracting bar spanning a concave cavity in the upper l,732,574 Brown 81. al. surface thereof 2,432,209 12/1947 3,114,554 12/1963 Hurley 273/176 F 5 Clams, 8 Drawmg Figures 'i /$A\%a PAIENIEmm 29 am INVENTOR.

/ v mmnl Fig. 3

Fig. 2

GOLF GAME APPARATUS This invention relates to certain new and meritorious improvements in a portable simulated golf game apparatus which is expressly, but not necessarily, designed and adapted for indoor use and which is characterized, speaking generally, by a game board structure which provides the players with an innovation a unique nine hole golf course.

Briefly, the game board is marginally bordered by a frame which provides inward and outward (forward and rearward) end walls and leftand right side walls, all of which function to encompass a playable suitably constructed cushioned safely playable golf ball. This framed board provides a playing field which embodies certain hazards, at least one sand trap and penalty lake. Primarily, the game board (leg-supported or not) has cup-equipped holes identified as l 9 and each hole is capable of being temporarily covered and then uncovered so that the ball putting sequences can be carried out systematically by the golfers. Equally important, if not more so, novelty is predicated on a suitable panel rising vertically from the remote or rearward end of the playing field and which constitutes a ball intercepting and rebounding backstop or backboard, whereby a properly aimed and driven ball is caused to bound back and onto the playing field where it assumes a lie from which it can then be p utted into hole number I, number 2 and so on until the nine holes have been played and the strokes counted to determine the low score winner.

Novelty is predicated on the ball striking and rebounding backboard wherein the front facing side is provided, specifically construed, with vertically spaced horizontal rows of circleseach circle being identified by a number and the numbers ranging from I to 9 inclusive. Each numbered circle constitutes a bull's eyetype ball target. The targets are oriented and adapted to coordinate with the cup-equipped holes which are correspondingly numbered.

T hen, too, the board is provided at its forward end with ball teeing means which extends horizontally and transversely and completely across the forward end of the playing field. To the ends desired readily insertable tees are provided and in a specific embodiment each tee may, and preferably does, comprise an elongated block which is wedge-shaped in elevation and constitutes and provides an upwardly and 'rearwardly inclined ramp. The ramp in turn comprises a ball guiding channel or groove which is provided with a ball seat at the ball teeing end and differently pitched blocks can, if desired, be used depending on whether the ball is being teed from a place of vantage to strike targets in the upper, median or lower row as the case may be.

A preferred embodiment of the board is that which is either leg-supported or not and is approximately 36 inches long and inches wide. Tothe ends desired there are nine holes approximately 1% inches in diameter and placed as shown in the plan illustration in FIG. 1. There can be three penalty areas, a lake, a sand trap and a so-called in-the-rough" zone. At the teeing end of the game board a main block is provided with an inclined surface rising progressively in height from left to right and having numbered tees with sockets for recep-v tion of retaining pins or dowels on the auxiliary blocktype ramps, as hereinafter more particularly set forth.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a golf game apparatus embodying the invention and illustrating the layout of the cup-equipped holes, lake, trap and penalty rough and further showing a ball teed up and ready to be struck with a short-handled driving iron or the like.

FIG. 2 is a central longitudinal sectional view taken on the plane of the central section line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-section on the vertical section line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is view of a fragmentary type showing the teeing means and a golf ball perched in readiness for use on a collared tee.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the transversely slotted end of the game board with an elongated main block constituting a readily applicable ball teeing member.

FIG. 6 is a view on an enlarged scale showing a single hole and the manner in which it is plugged and closed by an attachable and detachable plug.

FIG. 7 is a view on the section line 7-7 of FIG. 6 and which shows in phantom and full lines a hook-type implement which can, if desired, be used to lift and remove the insertable and removable cup closing plug.

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 4 and wherein one of the aforementioned inclined ramp-type tees is employed in lieu of the collared tee at the left in FIG. 4.

It should be explained at the outset of the description of the details that the game board is one which can be in the form of a self-contained leg-supported table or may be without legs and simply used as a table-type game board, that is an adaptation which can be placed atop a suitable table for recreational, amusement and diversionary use. As shown in the,views of the drawing the flat faced rectangular game board is denoted generally by the numeral 10 and has a planar or flat top side 12 and a corresponding flat bottom side 14. This board is suitably decorated and constructed to embody at least one penalty area lake as at 16 in FIG. 1, an appropriately located and constructed sand trap 18 and an in-'the-rough" zone as at 20 and which may be such that it extends completely across the left hand end 'porv tion of the board. Primarily, however, the board is characterized by ball putting holes which are numbered from 1 to 9 in any arranged order of play as suggested in FIG. 1. All of the holes are the same in construction and each hole is denoted by the numeral 22 and is of a size suitable to accommodate the cushioned, composite or other acceptably usable golf ball 25 (not detailed). In playing the game it would be within the purview of the concept to provide a single golf ball for all of the players or each player may have and use his own selected golf ball. In any event each hole as shown in FIG. 7 in particular is provided with a ball receiving cup 24 which is flanged and secured in place as at 26.

and close all of the holes which are not at the time in use. This can be accomplished by using applicable and removable cover means for example an insertable and removable plug 28 of the type shown in FIG. 7. The plug has a flat upper end portion 30 which is flush with the top surface 12 and may be provided with a seating lip 32. The upper portion is also provided with a concave recess 34 and a rigid spider or crossbar 36 which is provided to accommodate the hook portion 38 of a plug extracting tool or implement 40. The implement may be as shown in FIG. 7 and provided with a suitable handle. When it is necessary the tool is brought into play in the manner suggested in phantom lines and the plug 28 is withdrawn so that the hole will be uncovered for putting purposes.

With reference now to the right hand or rearward end of the game board it will be noted that the aforementioned backstop is provided here and is denoted by the numeral 42 and comprises a suitable rectangular panel whose left hand surface 44 provides the rebounding surface for the golf ball. This backstop, also referred to as a backboard, is shown in elevation in FIG. 3 and is provided on its ball striking surface with consecutively numbered bulls-eye-type targets. Each target comprises a suitably displayed ring 46 which is differentiated by a number such as for example as denoted at 48. It will be noted that the bulls-eyes or targets are arranged in rows wherein the lower row embodies three rings or targets 4, l and 7, the upper row embodying the targets 9, 6 and 3 reading from left to right, and the intervening row embodying targets 2, 8 and from left to right.

With respect now to the teeing end of the board it will be noted that there are nine individual tees reading from left to right when in a golf ball hitting position. The means shown comprises an elongated wooden or equivalent block 50 which has a rib 52 on its bottom side fitting into a keying slot 54 provided therefor. This is only one manner of constructing the teeing means and it is preferred that the block 50 at the right handend in FIG. 5 be of restricted cross-section as suggested at 56 and that the block should then increase progressively in thickness or cross-section to the thicker and higher end portion 58. The surface 60 therefore slants from the number 1 tee to the number 9 tee as'brought out in FIGS. 1 and 8. The number 1 tee is denoted at 62 in FIG. 1 and all of the teeing areas are separated by division lines 64. Each tee is preferably provided with a pair of off-center sockets 66 and 68 which open through the top to accommodate the stem 70 of the tee 72 as shown in FIG. 4. This tee is provided with a flange or collar 74 which assists in maintaining the tee in a given position. The tees can vary in height to accommodate the aforementioned golf ball. In practice the ball will be struck with a driver or driving iron such as denoted at 74 in FIG. I and which has a suitably proportioned blade 76 and shortened handle 78.

In playing the game each player may be provided with a club or a single club can be used for all of the participants. Moreover and in addition to the driver there will be a suitable putter (not shown). Then, too, and this is important, the game board is encompassed or surrounded by a frame which provides a playing field enclosure and is denoted generally by the numeral 80. The side walls which form the rim are denoted at 82 and are of suitable height and the forward and rearward end walls are conveniently denoted at 84 and 86 in FIG. 2. Then, too, and as before suggested the thus rimmed or enclosed playing field, including the board means, can if desired be provided with suitably constructed and attached supporting legs as denoted at 88.

It is obvious that the principal or underlying object of the game is to complete the nine holes with the least number of strokes as in playing a regular game of golf. With respect to the procedure of play it can be set forth here that to determine the order in which the players must shoot, a preliminary shot is made by each player. To this end, each player hits the ball from tee number 1 towards the hole number I on the game board by way of the ball-rebounding backstop or as it is also called, backboard. The player who hits the ball that lands nearest the hole number 1 is the first player to tee off; the second nearest player will tee off" second and so The game begins when the first player hits the ball from the tee number 1 towards the circle number 1 on the backstop or backboard. If the ball hits the circle numbered 1 on the backboard, a single stroke is counted. If it hits the backboard but misses circle number 1 (also referred to as a bulls-eye target) two strokes are counted. If the ball misses the backboard completely or if it bounces off the playing field of the game board, three strokes are counted and the ball is placed approximately one inch from where it (A) went off the game board or (B) from where it missed the backboard.

Whenever the ball rests on the lake, the sand trap, or on the rough, a two stroke penalty is counted and the ball is then placed at a point on the perimeter of the area nearest where the ball rests.

Whenever the ball rests against the backboard or the marginal wall of the frame, a one stroke penalty is counted and the ball is placed approximately 1 inch from that point.

Whenever the ball rolls into any hole other than the hole being played at that time, the player removes the ball from the hole and places it approximately 1 inch from the perimeter of that hole.

Resumption of play is resumed as follows:

Player number one hits the ball from where it rests directly towards hole number 1 on the game board. One stroke is counted for each time the ball is hit toward that hole. When the ball lands in the hole, the hole is completed and the total number of strokes is tallied for that hole.

Player number two begins to shoot and proceeds as player number one had done. The subsequent players follow in order.

When all the players have completed hole number 1, they will begin hole number 2 with the same procedure and the same order of play.

When the nine holes are completed and the scores are tallied, the player with the least number of strokes wins the game.

A hole in one is only accomplished when the player shoots from any tee, hits the identical numbered circle on the backboard, and the ball rebounds into the identical numbered hole on the game board.

It can be added that the tee ramp can be of three different heights: low, medium, and high. The low teeramp may be used for the first horizontal row of circles or targets on the backboard; the medium tee-ramps for the second row; and, the high ramps for the third row, this being optional.

Finally, and with further reference to the optional and selective tee-ramps, reference is now made to FIG. 8 wherein one such ramp is denoted at 90 and comprises a wedge-shaped block having a flat bottom side 92 carrying a depending peg or dowel 94 fitted removably into the socket 66. The upwardly inclined top surface of the tee or ramp has a ball groove or channel at the left hand end of which there is a recess or seat for the golf ball 25. The manner of use of the tee-ramp (FIG. 8) is deemed to be self-evident, for which reason a more extended description is thought to be unnecessary.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A portable simulated indoor-type golf game apparams-comprising: a horizontally elongated gameboard marginally surrounded by an enclosing frame having upper component rim portions rising at right angles above the plane of the top surface of said board and defining and providing an enclosed playing field for a prescribed golf ball, said playing field representing and serving as a fairway and embodying self-contained putting greens and being provided with at least nine upwardly opening holes into which said ball may enter, indicia means in the form of numerals l-9, one of said numerals being associated with each of said holes so that each of said holes is differently numbered, and each hole having there beneath an aligned cup in which said ball may be received and trapped, a rigid upstanding vertical panel fixed at a rearward terminal end of said board, said panel providing a wholly unobstructed ball striking and rebounding backboard and the front facing surface of said panel being devoid of any apertures therein capable of receiving said golf ball and having individual selectively usable vertically spaced horizontal rows of indicia forming distributively spaced circles individually numbered from 1-9 and providing selectively playable bulls eye-type ball targets adapted to provide first points of aim prior to putting said golf ballinto said cup-equipped holes, said game board being provided at its forward end with ball teeing means extending transversely across the forward end and parallel to said panel, said teeing means having an upper surface disposed at an inclination to facilitate driving said ball therefrom into contact with said distributively' spaced target circles on said panel.

2. The game apparatus according to claim 1, and, in combination, a readily insertable plug fitted removably into each hole and which, when in its place, has an upper flat surface which is flush with the surrounding upper surface of said playing field, and wherein said upper surface of said plug is concave and is provided with anintegral plug-dislodging and extracting bar which spans the concavity and is capable of being caught hold of by a manually usable lifting hook, whereby said hole can be plugged and covered when not in play and uncovered when readied for play.

3. The game apparatus according to claim 1, and wherein said teeing means comprises progressively usable individual tee areas, indicia meansin the form of numerals l-9 associated with said tee areas so that said tee areas are numbered consecutively from l-9, each tee area having at least one upwardly opening socket for accessible reception of an applicable and removable tee, having a peg portion which can be plugged and thus anchored in said socket and, in combination an attachable and detachable optionally usable teeing means comprising an elongated block wedge-shaped in edge elevation constituting and providing an inclined ramp, the top of said block having an open-ended ball guiding groove along which the ball is guidingly propelled when hit with the head of a club, said groove being provided at one end with a ball seating andteeing cavity, the underneath side of said block having a depending block positioning and retaining stud.

4. A simulated golf game playing apparatus comprising: a horizontally elongated gameboard having a planar playing field constituting a fairway and provided with at least nine ball sinking holes, each hole being equipped with an aligned ball receiving and trapping cup, said gameboard having an upstanding panel providing a vertical backstop at a rearward end of said panel and having ball teeing means at the forward end, said backstop providing a target and the vertical playing field confronting surface of said panel functioning, when it is struck by a properly aimed and driven ball,

to cause said ball to rebound forwardly and roll upon said playing field in a manner that it may drop in the cup of one of said holes or stop and come to rest after which it can be putted into a predetermined hole, said confronting surface having at least one target provided with indicia in the form of a predetermined hole designating number, said gameboard being marginally encompassed by an attached frame having upstanding rim portions which enclose the playing field and help to confine the ball within the putting limits of said field, a readily insertablehole closing plug for each hole, each plug being likewise readily removable and when in its closing position having an upper surface which is flush with the surrounding upper surface of said playing field, said upper surface having a concave cavity and an integral plug dislodging and extracting bar which spans the cavity and is capable of being caught hold of by a manually usable lifting hook whereby all of the holes except the hole which is being played can be covered when not intended to be used.

5. A simulated golf game playing apparatus comprising: a horizontally elongated gameboard having a planar playing field constituting a fairway and provided with at least nine ball sinking holes, each hole being equipped with an aligned depending ball receiving and trapping cup, said game board having an upstanding panel providing a vertical backstop at a rearward end, and ball teeing means at the forward end, said backstop providing a primary target and the vertical playing field confronting surface of said panel functioning, when struck by a properly aimed and driven ball, to cause said ball to strike, rebound'forwardly, and roll upon said playing field in a manner that it may (1) drop in a presecribed hole or (2) stop and assume a lie from which it can thereafter be putted into said hole, said confronting surface having at least one bulls-eye provided with a predetermined hole designating number, said teeing means comprising progressively usable individual tee areas numbered consecutively by indicia means in the form of numerals [-9, each tee area having at least two upwardly opening spaced sockets for accessible reception of an applicable and removable tee having a peg portion which can be plugged and thus anchored selectively, in either one of said sockets, and,

in combination, an attachable and detachable optionally usable tee comprising an elongated block wedgeshaped in edge elevation constituting and providing an inclined ramp, the top of said block having an openended ball guiding groove along which the ball is guidtioned peg portion.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1391306 *Jun 10, 1920Sep 20, 1921Eliaser RalphGame
US1469130 *Feb 13, 1922Sep 25, 1923Pleasant P WhitehairIndoor-golf game
US1582237 *Aug 19, 1925Apr 27, 1926Angell Emmett DGolf game
US1732574 *Jun 9, 1927Oct 22, 1929Said GlassAppliance for indoor games of golf
US2432209 *Oct 20, 1945Dec 9, 1947Osgood Harry WDriving tee for projectiles
US3114554 *Nov 21, 1961Dec 17, 1963Forward Ind IncGolf game apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4564198 *Nov 4, 1982Jan 14, 1986Kwik Tommy S OApparatus for use in playing a ball game
US5129653 *Aug 1, 1991Jul 14, 1992Habitat International, Inc.Golf putting trainer
US5662531 *Aug 13, 1996Sep 2, 1997Ibex Golf, L.C.Golf swing training mat for highly authentic practice
US5853335 *Apr 24, 1997Dec 29, 1998Self; Harry LeePitching and chipping golf game and training device
US6409607Apr 20, 1999Jun 25, 2002Jeffrey M. LibitGolf courses and methods of playing golf
US7153216 *Aug 4, 2003Dec 26, 2006Norm PressleyPutter alignment training system
US7775525 *Jun 27, 2006Aug 17, 2010Cs Industries, Inc.Game, method of manufacture, and method of use
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/317.2, 473/179, 473/164, 473/278
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0628
European ClassificationA63F7/06A9