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Publication numberUS3844600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1974
Filing dateOct 19, 1973
Priority dateOct 19, 1973
Also published asCA1011779A1
Publication numberUS 3844600 A, US 3844600A, US-A-3844600, US3844600 A, US3844600A
InventorsJay R
Original AssigneeJarke Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular storage rack for cylindrical loads
US 3844600 A
Abstract
An improved modular storage rack formed by a series of four corner support posts, each of a pair of corner support posts being interconnected by opposed parallel bottom nesting rails, a pair of square support tubes, angularly mounted on and interconnecting opposed pairs of support post members and disposed in cross orientation with respect to the parallel bottom nesting rails, the square support tubes being angularly inclined to present inclined flat support surfaces, thereby to carry cylindrical loads therebetween, wherein the improvement comprises a plurality of carrying bars, one of each of the carrying bars being mounted on the top of a corresponding corner support post and disposed in parallel orientation with respect to the bottom nesting rails and extending outwardly for a distance with respect to the corresponding support post and each of the carrying bars presenting a non-flat nestable surface along both the top and bottom post surfaces thereof, the top surface of each of the carrying bars having a mating nesting configuration of a corresponding bottom nesting rail.
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United States Patent [191 Jay L 1 3,844,600 [451 Oct. 29, 1974 MODULAR STORAGE RACK FOR CYLINDRICAL LOADS [75] Inventor: Richard S. Jay, Evanston, Ill.

v[73] Assignee: Jarke Corporation, Chicago, 111.

221 Filed: Oct. 19, 1973 21 Appl.No.:407,792

[52] US. Cl 294/67 D, 108/53, 211/49 R, 214/l0.5 R, 294/67 R [51] Int. Cl. B66c 1/00, B65d 21/00 [58] Field of Search 294/67 R, 67 D, 67 DA, 294/67 DB, 67 E, 67 EA, 81 R; 108/51, 53,

58; 211/13, 49 R, 60 R, 60 S, 71, 126, 148;

214/8, 10.5 R, 10.5 S, 15 R; 220/15 Primary Examiner-Evon C. Blunk Assistant Examiner-.lohnny D. Cherry Attorney, Agent, or FirmDor'ninik, Knechtel, Godula & Demeur [57] ABSTRACT An improved modular storage rack formed by a series of four corner support posts, each of a pair of corner support posts being interconnected by opposed parallel bottom nesting rails, a pair of square support tubes, angularly mounted on and interconnecting opposed pairs of support post members and disposed in cross orientation with respect to the parallel bottom nesting rails, the square support tubes being angularly inclined to present inclined flat support surfaces, thereby to carry cylindrical loads therebetween, wherein the improvement comprises a plurality of carrying bars, one of each of the carrying bars being mounted on the top of a corresponding corner support post and disposed in parallel orientation with respect to the bottom nesting rails and extending outwardly for a distance with respect to the corresponding support post and each of the carrying bars presenting a non-flat nestable surface along both the top and bottom post surfaces thereof, the top surface of each of the carrying bars having a mating nesting configuration of a corresponding bottom nesting rail.

5 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures MODULAR STORAGE RACK FOR CYLINDRICAL LOADS BACKGROUND OF THE lNVENTlON ,come advisable to employ the use of modular storage racks of a wide variety of types, which function to store a plurality of given items, as well as to permit vertical stacking of one storage rack upon another. The advantages provided by such modular racks are usually associated with rigid configurations, while at the same time permitting the storage of a number of otherwise cumbersome items and in addition, providing the ability to vertically stack a plurality of such racks with the items to be stored contained therein such that a minimum of floor space is utilized when a series of such racks are in vertical orientation.

Exemplary of a variety of such modular storage racks include the units shown in US. Pat. No. 2,801,752 which shows a modular stacking unit which accommodates the storage of bar stock and other similar elongated materials. Similarly U.S. Pat. No. 2,357,157, shows a material handling and storage hopper which facilitates the storage and handling of small parts. Still another example of such units is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,503,519, which again represents a structure for storing and handling elongated flexible stock and permitting the vertical storage of a plurality of bins containing such materials. US. Pat. No. 3,565,018 shows a modular storage rack which accommodates vertical stacking of a plurality of racks witheach of the racks having a full complement of the units or items to be stored thereon while still permitting vertical stacking thereof. Each of these patents are assigned to the assignee of the present invention.

With respect to cylindrical loads, various attempts have been made to develop modular storage racks, which not ony permit ease of storage of the cylindrical loads, but also facilitate the vertical stacking and orientation thereof. For example, the rack shown in US. Pat. No. 3,476,260 assigned to the assignee of the present invention, is directed to a pallet type storage rack which accommodates a pair of cylindrical drums positioned thereon, and due to the configuration of the top and bottom surfaces thereof, the storage racks may be vertically stacked and oriented in order to maximize the volume of items to be stored within a given unit of floor space. However, in order to develop a modular storage rack capable of accommodating a very cylindrical load, such as a cylindrical core of rolled steel, a wire, paper, or the like, it has become necessary to develop alternate forms of modular storage racks. In this connection, it is known that such storage racks must permit the use of fork lift trucks as well as C-shaped crane hooks, for the purpose of either removing the cylindrical load from the track, or transporting the rack from one location to another. It has also been deemed important to construct such racks in order to permit, once again, the vertical stacking and orientation of one rack upon another, when fully loaded with a large cylindrical load, thereby to maximize the warehousing space for such items.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES The principal object of the invention is therefore to provide an improved modular storage rack of the type which accommodates a large cylindrical load while at the same time being rigid in construction and stable when fully loaded and when vertically stacked.

A further object is to provide an improved modular storage rack which accommodates ease of transport by the use of either a fork lift truck or a four hook crane hitch wherein a great degree of stability is achieved when the hitch engages the modular rack for transport.

In connection with the foregoing object, it is yet another object of this invention to provide a modular storage rack of the type described which is improved by th use of a plurality of carrying bars each of which is mounted on the top end of a corresponding corner support post and positioned in parallel orientation with regard to the bottom nesting rails and which extend outwardly for a distance with respect to the corresponding corner support post, and each of the carrying bars presenting a non-flat nestable surface along the top and bottom exposed surfaces thereof, the top surface of each of the carrying bars having the mating nesting configuration of the corresponding bottom nextingrail, thereby to permit both the vertical nesting and stacking of a plurality of such modular storage racks as well as to accommodate a stable engagement of a crane hitch accordingly modified when positioned in grasping and engaging relation with the bottom portion of each of the carrying bars on a given modular storage rack.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a modular storage rack of the type described wherein the bottom nesting rails are each provided with a spaced guide plates and wherein the top carrying bars are provided with angularly inclined interior side edges whereby adjacent modular storage racks may be crossstacked by positioning the inclined guide plates along the bottom portion of the bottom nesting rails of one storage rack against the angularly inclined side edges of the carrying bars of an adjacent modular storage rack.

Further features of the invention pertain to the par ticular arrangement of the elements and parts whereby the above-outlined and additional operating features are attained.

The invention, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof will best be understood by reference to the following specification, taken in connection with theaccompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view showingthe positioning of a fork lift truck relative to the modular storage rack of the present invention, as well as the positioning of an industrial C-shaped hook and having a cylindrical load supported thereon;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the modular storage rack of the present invention, having a cylindrical load in place and the industrial C-shaped hook positioned within the load;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view showing two modular storage racks of the present invention in vertically stacked orientation;

FlG. 4 is a side elevational view of a modular storage rack of the present invention having a lifting four hook crane hitch under the carrying bars thereof, and showing the rack in lifted orientation;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view, partly in crosssection showing the nesting elements adjacent the top portion of one modular storage rack of the present invention and the lower end of an adjacent rack, as contemplated by the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view, partly in crosssection showing the manner in which the lifting four hook crane hitch engages the lower portion of the carrying bar to achieve a stable engagement and lift the racks;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view, partly in crosssection, showing an alternate embodiment of the present invention, wherein the carrying bar is of a circular configuration.

With specific reference to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the basic overall details of construction of the modular storage rack of the present invention are illustrated. The modular storage rack, generally referred to by the number 10, includes a series of four corner support posts 12, which are arranged in substantially rectangular orientation one with respect to the other. A pair of bottom nesting rails 14 are mounted on and interconnect a corresponding pair of opposed comer support posts, the bottom nesting rails 14 providing the bottom support surface for the modular storage rack 10. As will be noted with respect to the embodiment of the invention as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, the bottom nexting rail 14 is shown to be formed in the configuration of a right angle bar with an open channel 15 defined along the length thereof. A pair of square load bearing tubes 16 are mounted between opposed pairs of corner support posts 12, each of the load bearing tubes 16 being positioned in cross orientation with respect to the bottom nesting rail 14. It will therefore be apparent that the bottom nexting rails 14 also provide rigidifying support for one pair of corner support posts 12 while the load bearing tubes 16 provide rigififying support for opposed pairs of the corner support posts 12.

As viewed in FIG. 1 of the drawings, each of the pair of side corner support posts 12 are further rigidified by an angle brace 18, mounted on and extending between opposed corner support posts 12, while further structure rigidity is provided by a pair of structural channels mounted on and extending between the angle brace 18 and the bottom nesting rails 14. It will also be noted that each of the load bearing tubes 16 is mounted in part on a corresponding structural channel 20 such that the complete lower section of each of the modular storage racks 10 is rigidly and securely interconnected to provide a very firm structure for bearing the load of a cylindrical member 13.

As further shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, each of the load bearing tubes 16 is mounted in an angularly inclined disposition in order to permit tangential contact as between the cylindrical load 13 and the support surfaces of the load bearing tubes 16. It has been found from experience that by providing such a tangential contact as between the cylindrical load 13 and the support surfaces of the load bearing tubes 16, the possibility of marring the surfaces of the cylindrical load 13 or otherwise damaging the materials carried on the cylindrical load 13 is minimized. In addition, a more stablepositioning of the cylindrical load 13 on the rack 10 is also achieved.

It will further be noted by viewing FIG. 1 of the drawings that the pair of load bearing tubes 16 provide a convenient support surface for the use of the forks 21 of a fork lift truck, thereby permitting the rack 10 to be transported from one location to another by the use of a fork lift truck. Also illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings is the manner in which the cylindrical load 13, may be loaded and unloaded from the rack 10 by means of an industrial C-shaped crane hook 23, wherein the load bearing arm 24 may be easily positioned into the central core 25 of the cylindrical load 13 and the cylindrical load 13 thereafter being easily withdrawn from the rack 10. It is clearly apparent that in order to effect ease of operation, the modular storage rack 10 must be so constructed as to eliminate any side cross rail which would interfere with the operation of the C-shaped hook member 23, during the loading and unloading pressure. Hence, by providing the angle brace 18 between opposed corner support posts 12, along the lower portion of the rack 10, this difficulty is obviated.

In FIGS. 2, 4, 5 and 6 of the drawings, the details of construction of the carrying bars associated with the modular storage rack 10 of the present invention are illustrated. It will be observed that each of the corner support posts 12 is provided with a carrying bar 30, mounted thereon, and oriented in parallel configuration with respect to the bottom nesting rail 14. Each of the carrying bars is shown to be formed in a configuration of a square tube and fixedly secured to the top of each of the corner support posts 12 by any suitable means such as a weldment or the like. Furthermore, each carrying bar 30 in this particular embodiment is shown to be oriented such that the top surface of each carrying bar 30 forms an apex 32 while the lower surface thereof forms lower apex 34. Each carrying bar 30 extends both inwardly and outwardly beyond the corresponding corner support post 12 for a distance, for a purpose to be more fully defined hereinafter. The inner side edge 35 of each of the carrying bars 30 is shown to be angularly inclined downwardly while each of the outer side edges 36 is shown to be substantially vertical in orientation. A side closure plate 38 is mounted on the outer side edge 36 of the carrying bar 30 and extends downwardly therefrom for a distance having the lower edge 39 thereof, turned inwardly and mounted on the outside surface thereof of the corresponding corner support post 12. A reinforcing bar 40 is mounted on and fixedly secured as between the interior surfaces of the side closure plate 38, the lower edge 39 thereof, and the outside surface of the corner support post 12 to provide additional reinforcement during the lifting operation as against tensile forces which are operative during the lifting and carrying procedure. Hence, as between the lower surface of the carrying bar 30 and the side closure plate 38 and the reinforcing bar 40, there is defined a lifting aperture 42 which accommodates the insertion of a specially designed lifting four hook crane hitch 43, as is more fully shown in FIGS. 4 and 6 of the drawings.

It will be observed from FIG. 3 of the drawings that due to the configuration of the bottom nesting rail 14, and the top apex 32 of the carrying bar 30, nesting surfaces are created, thereby to provide a very stable orientation of modular racks, when vertical stacking one atop another is desired. It will be appreciated that the open channel 15 of the bottom nesting rail 14, matingly nests with the top apex 32 of the carrying bar.30, such that one rack 12, maybe vertically stacked upon another rack while fully loaded with a cylindrical load 13.

As more fully shown in FIG. 6 of the drawings, a lifting four hook crane hitch 43 is provided which is specially adapted by having carrying arms 44 having a V- shaped channel 45 provided therein, the V-shaped channel '45 providing a mating surface for the lower apex 34 of the carrying bar 30. The manner in which the lifting crane hitch 43 matingly engages the modular storage rack 10 is more particularly shown in FIGS. 4 and 6 of the drawings, where it is illustrated that each of the carrying arms 44 of the lifting four hook crane hitch 43 may be inserted within a corresponding lifting aperture 42 until the V-shaped channel 45 nestingly engages the lower apex 34 of the corresponding carrying bar 30. It will be appreciated that this mating engagement provides a positive interlock as between the lifting four hook crane hitch 43 and the rack 10, such that the lifting and transporting operation is facilitated with a minimum of danger to personnel working in and aboutthe general area where transport is occurring.

As mentioned previously, and as shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, the modular storage rack 10 of the present invention may be conveniently stacked in vertical orientation by merely nesting the bottom nesting rail 14 of one rack 10 on top of the carrying bars 30 of an adjacent rack 10. However, where it is deemed desirable to cross-stack the racks, the construction of the rack 10 of the present invention permits such cross-stacking in a convenient,-efficient, and stable manner. With reference to FIGS. 1 and 5 of the drawings, it will be observed that the bottom nesting rails 14 are each provided with a pair of guide plates 48 which are angularly mounted thereon, at an angle complementary to the angular inclineof the inner edge 35 of the carrying bar 30. As shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, where crossstacking is desired, the bottom nesting rails 14 of one rack 10 are cross-oriented with respect to the carrying bars 30 of an adjacent rack 10, such that the guide plates 48 rest against the inclined inner edge 35 of the carrying bar.30 of an adjacent rack 10. It will be appreciated that a very stable and firm interlock is achieved whereby the cross-stacking of adjacent racks 10 may be accomplished.

It will now become clear that the modular storage racks 10 of the present invention are suitable for accommodating the storage of any type of coiled metal rolls, coiled plastic, paper, coiled tubing, wire, rods, or any other fabricated or machined objects of a generally cylindrical shape, and which are substantially large in configuration. A firm and stable nestingof the circular load 13 within the rack 10 is accomplished as mentioned previously by the angular orientation of the load bearing tubes 16, mounted within the rack 10. In this manner, tangential support surfaces are presented for supporting the cylindrical load 13, thereby maximizing the security of the load 13 once stored in the rack 10, while at the same time minimizing the possibility of damaging the materials of the cylindrical load 13 during storage or transport.

It will also be apparent that the nesting features of the present invention may be accomplished with shapes may be formed of circular tubes 50 thereby presenting a top apex which is circular in configuration as well as a lower apex which is circular in configuration. in such an event, it may be desirable to adapt the V-shaped channel 45 of the carrying arm 44 to a circular configuration, although it should be clear that a V-shaped channel 45 will still achieve tangential contact with a circular configuration in order to provide a firm and stable interlock. Similarly, the bottom nesting rails 14 may be adapted to semicircular rails, although the 90 angle shown in connection with the bottom nesting rails 14 of the preferred embodiment will similarly achieve tangential contact with a circular shape, and hence, neither the bottom nesting rails 14 nor the V-shaped channel 45 of the lifting arm 44 of the lifting crane hook 43, need be altered in configuration where the carrying bars 30 are formed by circular tubes. It will also be appreciated that other shapes may similarly be employed for the carrying bars 30, in which event, adaptation must be made to the bottom nesting rails 14, and the V-shaped channel 45 of the carrying arms 44, in order to achieve a matingly nesting interlock as between the bottom nesting rails 14 and channel 45 of the carrying arms 44, with respect to the particular configuration employed for the carrying bar 30. As shown in FIG. 7 the carrying bar 50 is circular in configuration and in this embodiment, it is contemplated that the bottom nesting rail 14, and the V-shaped channel 45 of the carrying arm 44 need not be changed in configuration in order to provide a film and secure interlock with the carrying bar 50, due to the tangential contact achieved between the elements.

' It is clear from the above description that the invention thereby provides a very convenient and rigid modular storage rack for accommodating the storage and transport of large cylindrical loads while at the same time permitting the stacking in a vertical orientation of such racks when fully loaded. in this manner, in spite of the fact that significantly large loads may be carried by the racks, the vertical storage of such racks permits maximum use of warehousing space while also maximizing the stability achieved during the storage and stacking operation.

While there has been described what is at present considered to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be understood that various modifications may be made therein, and it is intended to cover in the appended claims, all such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a modular storage rack for cylindrical loads of the type formed by a plurality of corner support post other than square tubing, such as the configuration set forth above with respect to the carrying bars 30. As shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings, the carrying bars 30 members, a pair of opposed parallel bottom nesting rails mounted on and interconnecting opposed pairs of corner support post members, a pair of square support tubes angularly mounted on and interconnecting opposed pairs of support post members and disposed in cross orientation with respect to the parallel bottom an? gles, the square support tubes being angularly inclined to present inclined flat support surfaces thereby to carry a cylindrical load therebetween, and further including structural channels to rigidify and strengthen the storage rack the improvement comprising in combination,

a plurality of carrying bars, each of said carrying bars being mounted on 'the top of a corresponding corner support post in parallel orientation with respect to the bottom nesting rails and extending outwardly for a distance with respect to each of the corner support posts, and each of said carrying bars presenting a non-fiat nestable surface along the top and bottom exposed surfaces thereof, said top surface of each of said carrying bars having the matingly nesting configuration of a corresponding bottom nesting rail, whereby a series of modular storage racks may be vertically stacked by positioning the bottom nexting rails of one rack on the top surface of the carrying bars of an adjacent rack, such that the carrying bars nest within a corresponding bottom nesting rail, while at the same time presenting a lower surface for said carrying bars which matingly nest with independent carrying hooks to provide a stable and positive engagement of the carrying hook with said carrying bars'to facilitate the lifting and transpo of said modular storage rack. 2. The improved modular storage rack as set forth in claim 1 above, which further includes a closure plate mounted on the outside terminal edge of each of said carrying bars and extending downwardly therefrom and having the lower edge thereof turned inwardly and mounted on a corresponding corner support post, thereby to define a hook lifting aperture.

3. The improved modular storage rack as set forth in claim 2 above which further includes a reinforcing bar mounted along the interior surface of each of said closure plates and along the inturned lower edges thereof, thereby to reinforce the hook lifting apertures against tensile forces during the lift procedure.

4. The improved modular storage rack as set forth in claim 1 above, wherein each of said bottom nesting rails includes a pair of spaced guide plates angularly mounted thereon and the interior edge of each of said carrying bars is angularly inclined downwardly, whereby a pair of adjacent racks may be cross-stacked by nesting said guide plates against the angularly inclined interior edges of said carrying bars.

5. The improved modular storage rack as set forth in claim 1 above, wherein said carrying bars are each square in external configuration and having opposed apexes forming the top and bottom exposed surfaces of said carrying bars.

Patent Citations
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US1926432 *Jun 27, 1932Sep 12, 1933Pennsylvania Railroad CoTransportation container
US2801752 *Dec 3, 1954Aug 6, 1957Jarke Mfg CompanyModular stacking unit
US3028186 *Mar 4, 1959Apr 3, 1962Paltier CorpLifting device for bar stock rack
US3053492 *Sep 30, 1960Sep 11, 1962Fed IndStorage pallets
US3303944 *Apr 15, 1964Feb 14, 1967Parsons CorpMaterials-handling stackable rack and self-engaging grab hoist therefor
US3762343 *Mar 3, 1972Oct 2, 1973Bliss & Laughlin IndEnd-nesting containers adapted to stack
Referenced by
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US4113118 *Jul 26, 1976Sep 12, 1978Toter-Tee, Inc.Loading arrangement
US4690601 *Jan 14, 1983Sep 1, 1987Siegried DeliusStorage assembly and method of using same
US4732528 *Oct 14, 1986Mar 22, 1988Cold Metal Products Corp.Returnable skid and method and assembly using same
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US6974042Jul 16, 2002Dec 13, 2005Hall Donald MNestable and/or liftable rack
US7419063May 3, 2004Sep 2, 2008M & E Manufacturing Company, Inc.Nestable and liftable oven rack
US8191717 *Apr 21, 2010Jun 5, 2012Simple Bundle Ltd.System for safely transporting loading and unloading slabs
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