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Publication numberUS3846086 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1974
Filing dateSep 10, 1970
Priority dateSep 10, 1970
Publication numberUS 3846086 A, US 3846086A, US-A-3846086, US3846086 A, US3846086A
InventorsBalch C, Gendreau A
Original AssigneeBalch C, Gendreau A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ignitable fuel package
US 3846086 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,846,686 Patented Nov. 5, I974 3,846,086 IGNKTABLIE FUEL PACKAGE Conrad J. Balch, RR. 2, Box 208, and Armand W. Gen6dreau, 532 Main St., both of Sandpoint, Idaho 838 4 No Drawing. Filed Sept. 10, 1970, Ser. No. 71,266 Int. Cl. Cltll 11/00 U.S. CI. 4440 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DESCLOSURE An ignitable fuel package comprising in combination finely divided particles comprising cellulose and finely divided carbon particles, substantially saturated with a normally liquid fuel and sealed in an impervious combustible plastic envelope, and method for preparing said fuel package.

This invention relates to fuel compos tions and fuel packages useful for kindling fires, for example barbecue fires. More particularly, the invention reiates to fuel com positions and fuel packages which serve not as the main fuel for a fire, but as kindling material which burns for a sufiicient length of time to cause burning of the main fuel to progress sufiiciently to 'be self-sustaining.

PRIOR ART Various fuel compositions and fuel packages, useful both as the main fuel or as kindling fuel, or both, for fires such as barbecue fires, are known. For example, the following prior art US. patents disclose the indicated fuel compositions and fuel packages:

2,01l,245-Coal particles, up to /2" size, in paper bag reinforced with heat-resistant mesh, used in large packages as main fuel.

2,206,362-B ag of paper or other combustible material, containing charcoal lumps and either: (a) shredded paper; or (b) wood chips soaked in pine oil, used as a fire kindler. Alternatively, charcoal impregnated with pine oil, with no paper or wood, is used.

2,240,335-Bag of paper or other combustible material containing charcoal lumps coated with wax, used as a fire kindler or a main fuel.

2,799,563Bag of paper or cellophane, containing a charcoal-containing briquette and a cellulose-containing material, for use as a main fuel.

2,963,352Ch-arcoal particles having minor dimensions of at least /2", impregnated with alcohol, located in a sealed metal container, for use as a main fuel.

3,232,72l-Solid-form composition comprising a liquid hydrocarbon and a solid polyolefin, for use as a fire kindler.

3,351,443Charcoal lumps or briquettes, impregnated with liquid hydrocarbon and sealed in plastic container, for use as main fuel.

3,395,002-Charcoal briquettes impregnated with polymer dissolved in alcohol, immersed in water to gel the impregnant, and coated with a polymer film if desired, for use as a main fuel.

Each of the above and other similar prior art fuel compositions and fuel packages, particularly those intended for use as fire kindlers, has been developed in efforts to provide various and numerous advantages not possessed by prior compositions and fuel packages. Such advantages that have been sought include: increased burning duration, cleaner during handling, cleaner burning, easier ignition, less deterioration or loss of ingredients during storage, less formulation difficulty, less cost, less odor, less danger of explosion, economy of packaging space, and more visibility of package contents. Some of the various prior art compositions have achieved some of the improvements sought, and some have achieved others. However, there still has existed room for improvement. In particular, there has been a need for a single fuel package that would achieve the result of providing all or most of the advantages heretofore sought, together with additional advantages. The fuel package of the pres ent invention achieves that result.

STATEMENT OF INVENTION In accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention, there is provided an ignitable fuel package comprising in combination finely divided particles comprising cellulose, finely divided carbon particles, a normally liquid fuel and an impervious combustible plastic envelope, said particles comprising cellulose and said carbon particles being substantially saturated with said normally liquid fuel and being sealed in said envelope.

In accordance with a further embodiment of the present invention, there is provided an ignitable fuel package comprising in combination:

(a) finely divided particles comprising cellulose, in an amount of 25 to weight percent, based on the total contents of said package;

(b) particles substantially comprising carbon, in an amount of l to 15 weight percent, based on the total contents of said package;

(c) a normally liquid fuel, in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent, based on the contents of said package; and

(d) an impervious combustible plastic envelope; said particles comprising cellulose and said carbon particles being substantially saturated with said normally liquid fuel, relatively dry to the touch, relatively free-flowing, intimately mixed, and sealed in said envelope.

In accordance with a further embodiment of the present invention, there is provided an ignitable fuel package comprising in combination:

(a) particles comprising cellulose,

(i) in an amount of 25 to 75 weight percent, based on the weight of the total contents of said package,

(ii) at least weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below A1",

(iii) at least 70 weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below Ma",

(b) particles substantially comprising carbon,

(i) in an amount of 1 to 15 weight percent, based on the total contents of said package,

(ii) at least 90 weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below A",

(iii) at least 70 weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below M3,

(c) a normally liquid fuel selected from hydrocarbons and alcohol, in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent, based on the weight of the total contents of said package,

(d) an envelope substantially comprising plastic, said plastic being (i) combustible,

(ii) in the form of a thin film,

(iii) substantially impervious to passage therethrough of said normally liquid fuel as such or in vapor form,

(iv) heat sealable;

said particles comprising cellulose, said particles comprising carbon and said normally liquid fuel being contained in said envelope, said envelope being heat sealed to prevent evaporation of said normally liquid fuel, said normally liquid fuel being substantially taken up, that is, absorbed and/or adsorbed, by said particles comprising cellulose and said particles comprising carbon.

In accordance with a further embodiment of the present invention, there is provided a method for preparing an ignitable fuel package, which comprises:

(a) substantially saturating particles comprising cellulose with a normally liquid fuel,

(b) mixing said substantially saturated particles with particles substantially comprising carbon, and

(c) sealing said particles so mixed in an impervious combustible envelope.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Particles Comprising Cellulose The particles comprising cellulose may be sawdust, chips or other particles derived from natural wood or from synthetic compositions comprising cellulose. Said synthetic compositions comprising cellulose may be pressed wood or wood by-product compositions, including, blocks, boards and paper. However, thin paper particles have borderline acceptability.

A substantial preponderance of the particles preferably will have a length not exceeding two times the width, and a width not exceeding two times the thickness. Thin, elongated materials such as lengthy shreds of thin paper are unsatisfactory. Preferably a substantial preponderance of the particles will have proportions of length, width and thickness that do not vary substantially from natural wood sawdust.

At least 90 weight percent of the particles, based on the total package contents, should have a major particle dimension which is below A". At least 70 weight percent of the particles, based on the total package contents, should have a major particle dimension which is below /8".

Fine particles such as sawdust derived from natural 9 wood or synthetic wood compositions are most useful, with fine sawdust derived from natural wood being preferred. It is even more preferred to further grind or otherwise powder the fine particles such as sawdust, because in such finer form the particles absorb the liquid fuel better, and mix more intimately with the particles comprising carbon.

The particles will be present in the fuel package in an amount of to 75 weight percent, preferably to 60 Weight percent, based on the total contents of the package.

PARTICLES COMPRISING CARBON The carbon in the particles comprising carbon may be bone charcoal, wood charcoal, charcoal obtained by substantially carbonizing various other types of organic matter, amorphous carbon, natural carbon such as graphite, petroleum coke, or any other type of carbon amenable to easy comminution by simple mechanical operations. Carbon in a metastable state is not preferred.

The particles comprising carbon preferably are substantially pure carbon, although any particles containing substantial amounts of carbon are operable. Especially good results have been obtained with Darco carbon, a highly fired carbon derived from lignite, manufactured by Atlas Chemical Industries, Wilmington, Del. 19899.

At least 90 weight percent of the particles, based on the total package contents, should have a major particle dimension which is below A. At least 70 weight percent of the particles, based on the total package contents, should have a major particle dimension which is below As". The best results are obtained when a substantial proporiton of the particles have a major particle dimension which is below 5 with particles in highly pulverized fine powder form being most preferred. The optimum results are obtained when the particles are fine enough to cause the particles comprising cellulose to darken when they are mixed with the particles comprising carbon so that the resulting blended mixture has a relatively uniform dark appearance rather than a salt-and-pepper appearance.

The particles will be present in the fuel package in an amount of 1 to 15 weight percent preferably 3 to 10 weight percent based on the total contents of the package.

NORMALLY LIQUID FUEL The normally liquid fuel is a normally liquid hydrocarbon or a normally liquid oxygenated hydrocarbon such as alcohol ketone, ester or ether. Normally liquid hydrocarbons boiling within the range 300-650 F. preferably 350-600 F. more preferably 350-500 F. are preferred to the oxygenated hydrocarbons.

Normally liquid hydrocarbon fuels substantially comprising paraffins are preferred. A substantial aromatic content produces undesirable results including smoky burning and excessive odor. Preferably the cyclic content is below 15 volume percent and the aromatic content is below 10 volume percent. Of the normally liquid hydrocarbon fuels substantially comprising paraffins those substantially comprising isoparafiins are most preferred.

The normally liquid fuel is used in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent, preferably 35 to 55 weight percent, based on the total package contents. Smaller amounts provide substantially less than optimum iginition characteristics. Larger amounts cause excessive flame.

Especially good results have been obtained with Chevron ISO P 370, an odorless hydrocarbon liquid, manufactured by Standard Oil Company of California, having the following specifications:

Saybolt Color +30 Specific gravity at 60 F. (6.36 #/gal. at 60 F.) 0.7645 Flash point:

TCC 132 F. TOC 144 F. Aniline point 183 F. Kauri butanol value 27 Toluene plus ethylbenzene, vol. percent 0 Xylene plus C aromatics, vol. percent 0 Naphthenes, vol. percent 0 Paratfins, vol. percent 97 Boiling range, F.:

IBP 358 10 percent 366 50 percent 370 70 percent 376 90 percent 380 Dry Point 396 90% evaporation time at F., minutes 215 IMPERVIOUS COMBUSTIBLE PLASTIC ENVELOPE The impervious combustible plastic envelope serves to hold together the mixture of particles comprising cellulose and particles comprising carbon prior to use of the fuel package, serves to prevent evaporation of the normally liquid fuel, and while the fuel package is burning, the unburned portion of the envelope continues to hold the particle mixture together. The envelope cannot be paper, which would flare up and burn too quickly if untreated, and would permit evaporation of the normally liquid fuel. The envelope cannot be a non-combustible material such as metallic foil.

The envelope must be substantially impervious to the passage therethrough of the normally liquid fuel or vapors thereof. It must be initially so impervious, or must be coated or otherwise treated to make it so impervious.

Preferably the envelope is a substantially transparent plastic film material, desirably a medium-weight polymer film such as a polyolefin or polyester.

Pervious breathable plastic materials such as are used for food packaging are unacceptable because they would permit evaporation of the normally liquid fuel from the package. These materials also generally are too light to have adequate mechanical strength, and have unacceptable burning chracteristics.

The envelope material desirably is readily susceptible to heat sealing, although an adhesive sealed envelope also is contemplated.

Especially good results have been obtained with Scotch 20-A-5 polyester film, manufactured by Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company.

PREPARATION OF FUEL PACKAGE It has been found that criticalities exist in the preparation of the fuel package ingredients, in the combination of those ingredients, and in the packaging of those ingredients.

The size ranges for the particles comprising cellulose and the particles comprising carbon, that are given above, should be observed. Unacceptable results are obtained with particles that are too large, because impregnation of quate air space between said kindling and/or charcoal. The fuel package then may be ignited with a match at one corner or edge thereof. The plastic film will tend to burn first from the top side of the package, and the contents of the package will continue to burn for many minutes thereafter, providing adequate flame and burning time to cause a self-sustaining combustion of the main fuel in the barbecue pit. The plastic film on the underside of the package will be covered by the package contents and the burning thereof accordingly will be delayed, enabling it such particles with the liquid fuel cannot be accomplished 10 t h M h k d b adequately, and the necessary intimate admixture of the f t 5 pac age contents as a tray urmg ulmng two kinds of particles cannot be obtained. Optimum refzontgms' k b sults are obtained when both kinds of particles are finely unng i flame h bllrnmg pac age comminuted, at least to the consistency of a coarse powsmothered otherwlse extmgmshefiflthe package der, and preferably to the consistency of a medium or 881.5113 m re'hghted preferably first snmng or other fine powden wise agltatlng the package contents.

The normally liquid fuel should not be combined with If the package usedpn the open grates of a firepiace the particles comprising carbon in the absence of the parplefelably the packtge is placed on top of Conventional ticles comprising cellulose, because it tends to dissolve kmdhng Wood used In the fireplace the particles comprising carbon if those particles become EXAMPLES too wetted with the fuel.

The particles comprising cellulose may be contacted, The fOhOWing examPles 0f tghitable fuel Packages Will in the absence of the particles comprising carbon, with a serve to further aid a complete understanding of the pressufficient amount of normally liquid fuel to substantially ent invention Example 3 is an example Of an ignitflble impregnate or saturate the particles, without any superfuel Package according to the Present inventtoh- The other natant liquid or other excess of fuel being present to cause eXarnplcs are provided for purposes of comparison. the particles to form a slurry or a wet agglomerated mass. In each of the examples, finely Powdered ee1lu10Se"e0n- Thereafter, without use of further amounts of liquid fuel, taming Particles cehsistihg of Wood Sawdust further the impregnated or saturated particles comprising celluminuted into a p y form W s In h of t lose may be thoroughly blended or mixed with the parexamples finely powdered Darco lignite-derived carticles comprising carbon. The particles comprising carbon take up from the particles comprising cellulose, by absorption and/or adsorption, a portion of the liquid fuel carried by the latter. However, in this method, care must be bon, manufactured by Atlas Chemical Industries, Inc., Wilmington, Del., was used. In each of the examples the weight percentages given are based on the total contents of the combustible film envelope.

Example Normally liquid aromatic cleaning solvent, wt percent Kerosene, wt. percent Scotch 20 A5 Polyester Film envelope-.

Light breathable pervious plastic fihn of type used for food packaging taken to prevent the particles comprising carbon from agglomerating.

In any case, the amount of normally liquid fuel will have been so chosen that the resulting mixture of liquid fuel-impregnated particles, while containing a high percentage of normally liquid fuel, will be relatively dry to The following comments on the results in each of the above examples point up the unobviousness of the present invention, by indicating the unacceptable results obtained when the critical components of the fuel package of the invention are replaced by substitute materials.

Example Comment the touch, relatively free-flowing, and will not be a mass 1 Didnt We, of agglomerated Particles' when the mixture these 2 Didnt burn well. No significant shelf life because characteristics, its burning characteristics will be optimum. of evaporation of normally liquid fuel through Ideally, when the two kinds of particles have an adepervious envelopi quately small size, the particles comprising cellulose be- 3 Exhibited excellent Storage and burning characm come darkened by intimate contact with the particles comistim NO evaporation of normally liquid f l prising carbon, until the entire mixture assumes a reladuring storage Burned steadily with essentially tiVelY unitofm dark 01013 no visible smoke, and with no odor.

The Pamcle mixture so Prepared 15 Sealed the impel" 4 Satisfactory burning characteristics when used im- Vious Combustible Plastic envelope, Preferably y heat mediately. However, no significant shelf life besealing the envelope in a known manner, although adhebecause f evaporation f normally liquid f l Sive Sealing y be usedthrough pervious envelope.

y desired q y of the Partlcle mixture 30 Prepared 5 Burned erratically with excessive smoke and odor. y be encased in the impervious Combustible Plastic 6 Burned erratically with excessive smoke and odor. envelope; however: as a general guide, envelopes about No significant shelf life because of evaporation 2-3 inches long and 23 inches wide, containing /2-ounce of normally liquid fuel through pervious envelope. to 2 ounces of said mixture have been found to be most 7 Burned erratically with excessive smoke and some useful. It is desirable that said mixture completely fill the odor. envelope to the extent possible by pouring the mixture 8 Burned erratically with excessive smoke and some into the envelope. odor. No significant shelf life because of evaporation of normally liquid fuel through pervious USE OF THE FUEL PACKAGE envelope.

9 Burned with excessive flame, with some smoke.

The fuel package may be used by being laid flat on the 10 Burned with excessive flame, with some smoke. N0 bottom of a barbecue pit, and by being covered with kin significant shelf life because of evaporation of dling and/or a main fuel such as charcoal, leaving adenormally liquid fuel through pervious envelope.

When paper envelopes were used in various additional tests, unsatisfactory results were obtained, that were similar to those obtained when a pervious plastic film envelope was used.

It was found in other tests that variations within the ranges prescribed herein in the proportions of celulosecontaining particles, carbon-containing particles and normally liquid fuel, used in Example 3 above, did not significantly affect the excellent results obtained by the fuel package of the present invention. On the other hand, similar variations in the proportions of the ingredients used in the comparison examples above did not significantly affect the poor results obtained by the products of those examples.

Conclusion From the foregoing it may be seen that the ignitable fuel package of the present invention results in a combination of advantages that long have been sought in a single product, including ease of preparation, excellent shelf life, odorless storage, cleanliness in handling, odorless burning, clean burning, long burning with adequate flame, visibility of package contents, and economy of packaging space.

What is claimed is:

1. An ignitable fuel package comprising in combination finely divided particles comprising cellulose, finely divided carbon particles, at least 90 weight percent of said carbon particles having a major particle dimension below inch, a normally liquid fuel and an impervious combustible plastic envelope, said particles comprising cellulose and said carbon particles being substantially saturated with said normally liquid fuel and being sealed in said envelope, said normally liquid fuel being present in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent based on the contents of said package and being selected from nor mally liquid hydrocarbons and normally liquid oxygenated hydrocarbons, said normally liquid hydrocarbons substantially comprising parafiins.

2. An ignitable fuel package comprising in combination:

(a) finely divided particles comprising cellulose, in an amount of 25 to 75 weight percent, based on the total contents of said package;

(b) particles substantially comprising carbon in an amount of 1 to weight percent, based on the total contents of said package;

(c) a normally liquid fuel, in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent, based on the contents of said package selected from normally liquid hydrocarbons and normally liquid oxygenated hydrocarbons, said normally liquid hydrocarbons substantially comprising paraffins; and

(d) an impervious combustible plastic envelope; said particles comprising cellulose and said carbon particles being substantially saturated with said normally liquid fuel, relatively dry to the touch, relatively free-flowing, intimately mixed, and sealed in said envelope.

3. An ignitable fuel package comprising in combination:

(a) particles comprising cellulose,

(i) in an amount of 25 to 75 weight percent, based on the weight of the total contents of said package,

(ii) at least 90 weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below A",

(iii) at least 70 weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below /s",

(b) particles substantially comprising carbon,

(i) in an amount of 1 to 15 weight percent, based on the total contents of said package,

(ii) at least 90 weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below A",

(iii) at least 70 Weight percent of which have a major particle dimension below /8",

(c) a normally liquid fuel, in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent, based on the weight of the total contents of said package, selected from normally liquid hydrocarbons and normally liquid oxygenated hydrocarbons, said normally liquid hydrocarbons substantially comprising parafiins,

(d) an envelope substantially comprising plastic, said plastic being (i) combustible,

(ii) in the form of a thin film,

(iii) substantially impervious to passage therethrough of said normally liquid fuel as such or in vapor form,

(iv) heat sealable;

said particles comprising cellulose, said particles comprising carbon and said normally liquid fuel 'being contained in said envelope, said envelope being heat sealed to prevent evaporation of said normally liquid fuel, said normally liquid fuel being substantially taken up, that is, absorbed and/or adsorbed, by said particles comprising cellulose and said particles comprising carbon.

4. A method for preparing an ignitable fuel package, which comprises:

(a) mixing particles comprising cellulose with parti cles substantially comprising carbon, said carbon particles substantially comprising carbon being present in an amount of 1-15 weight percent based on the total contents of said package,

(1)) substantially saturating the particles in the resulting mixture with a normally liquid fuel, in an amount of 24 to 60 weight percent, based on the weight of the total contents of said package, selected from normally liquid hydrocarbons and normally liquid oxygenated hydrocarbons, said normally liquid hydrocarbons substantially comprising parafiins, and

(c) sealing said particles so mixed in an impervious combustible envelope.

5. A fuel package as in Claim 1, wherein said normally liquid fuel has an aromatic content below 10 volume percent.

6. A fuel package as in Claim 1, wherein said normally liquid fuel substantially comprises isoparaffins.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 7/ 1967 Great Britain 4441 CARL F. DEES, Primary Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4095957 *Mar 22, 1977Jun 20, 1978Orsing J HGrilling
US4101292 *Aug 10, 1977Jul 18, 1978Hogan Ii Robert PaulCharcoal briquette packaging technique
US4179270 *Jul 27, 1978Dec 18, 1979Mobil Oil CorporationAid for kindling fires
US4225318 *May 11, 1978Sep 30, 1980Wrigley Jr Hank JFor starting campfires
US4775391 *Jul 8, 1987Oct 4, 1988Antosko Henry BFuel package
US4878922 *Jul 26, 1988Nov 7, 1989A And A Realty CompanyFireplace starter composition
US4906254 *Sep 27, 1988Mar 6, 1990Antosko Henry BFuel package
US7279017Feb 21, 2003Oct 9, 2007Colt Engineering CorporationMethod for converting heavy oil residuum to a useful fuel
US7341102Apr 28, 2005Mar 11, 2008Diamond Qc Technologies Inc.Flue gas injection for heavy oil recovery
US7770640Feb 6, 2007Aug 10, 2010Diamond Qc Technologies Inc.Carbon dioxide enriched flue gas injection for hydrocarbon recovery
US8808409 *Feb 27, 2009Aug 19, 2014Insta-Fire LlcRechargeable fire starter and long burning fuel
US20100218418 *Feb 27, 2009Sep 2, 2010Banner Konel SRechargeable fire starter and long burning fuel
Classifications
U.S. Classification44/280, 44/605, 44/502, 44/541, 44/282, 44/281
International ClassificationC10L11/00, C10L11/04
Cooperative ClassificationC10L11/04
European ClassificationC10L11/04