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Publication numberUS3846214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1974
Filing dateMay 23, 1973
Priority dateMay 23, 1973
Publication numberUS 3846214 A, US 3846214A, US-A-3846214, US3846214 A, US3846214A
InventorsAltenhaus R, Rosenzweig J
Original AssigneeAltenhaus R, Rosenzweig J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ornamental plaque
US 3846214 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nav. 5, 1974 Filed May 23, 1973 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Nov. 5, 1974 J. RosENzwElc ETAL 3,846,214

ORNAMENTAL PLAQUE Fled May 23, 1975 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 .IIIIIII' ,-IJII. I l |,I|IW/| United States atent O 3,846,214 ORNAMENTAL PLAQUE Julius Rosenzweig, 2501 Nostrand Ave. 11210, and Rhoda Altenhaus, 1230 Avenue Y 11235, both of Brooklyn, N.Y.

Filed May 23, 1973, Ser. No. 363,250 Int. Cl. B44f 9/00 U.S. Cl. 161-19 23 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An ornamental plaque has a planar sheet of pierceable material in the form of a foamed or cellular plastic. A velour material is secured to the planar sheet to substantially cover one major surface thereof. The velour material is provided with imprinted markings which define an outline of a decorative pattern. A plurality of beads are mounted on the planar sheet to correspond with the outline on the velour material, each bead being apertured and fixed to the planar sheet by means of pins the stems of which extend through the apertures in the beads and into the planar sheet. The heads of the pins provide the retaining action. To provide different three-dimensional eifect, more than one bead is stacked on the stern of one pin before the stem is forced into the planar sheet. Also, where mounted pins in contact with the planar sheet form spaces between adjacent beads, further beads are mounted spaced above the planar sheet whose associated pin extend into the planar sheet through the spaces so formed. With such construction, the velour material is visible through the spaces not so covered and about the periphery of the design pattern and provides a decorative background therefor. An ornamental ribbon extends about and is connected to the periphery of the planar sheet. Means are provided on the other major surface for afxing the decorative or ornamental plaque on a wall surface.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention generally relates to ornamental plaques, and more particularly to a plaque formed by mounting beads having pins associated therewith onto a planar sheet of pierceable material by urging the pins into the pierceable material. The present invention also relates to the method of forming the ornamental plaque.

There are known in the prior art many toys and plaque forming kits which utilize the concept of mounting a plurality of members on a relatively flat surface. Sometimes, the object is to generate a predetermined design in accordance with given instructions. In other instances, the objects may be mounted in an arbitrary manner to form a fanciful or original design. However, the prior art devices have had disadvantages which have limited their commercial success. For example, a mosaic-like arrangement is known which provides a pan-like rectangular mounting member which is adapted to receive mosaictype elements which are to be positioned within the panlike member. The mosaic elements are provided with upper decorative ends which remain exposed when the member or frame is fully lilled. A disadvantage of this arrangement is that it lirst requires a specially prepared panlike member for receiving the elements. The elements themselves must be specially constructed. The special manufacturing involved represents additional expenses. Further, in the use of this arrangement, it is necessary in each instance to completely ll the pan-like rectangular member in order to wedge and thereby retain the mosaic elements within the frame. Therefore, even when a simple design is to be constructed, the user must nevertheless expand considerable time in fully filling the frame member.

ice,

There are also known numerous toys which permit the mounting of elements on a generally planar surface. However, in most instances, the elements to be mounted are mounted on an apertured base or sheet. Numerous apertures are provided, typically in parallel rows and columns, to give the user flexibility in the positions in which the elements are to be mounted. The elements themselves are generally provided with special end portions which are conigurated to fit interiorly of the apertures in the base. A disadvantage of these embodiments arises from the fact that apertured bases or sheets must be providedthis representing an additional manufacturing step and additional expense. Further, by providing predetermined locations for the apertures, the user is limited as to the precise locations on which the mountable elements can be mounted.

A further disadvantage of the prior art toys and ornamental devices of the type under discussion resides in that these are generally not suitable for use as a decorative plaque which can be mounted on a wall to enhance the decor of the area in which it is mounted. Most of the toys and such similar devices are primarily adapted to produce numerous designs or patterns as an educational process or as a means for occupying a persons time. Consequently, while a pattern formed on a prior art toy or device may be mounted on a wall, this is generally not the intention or purpose thereof and, in most instances, the toy or device does not possess the aesthetic qualities which may be desired.

Other prior art toys and devices of the type under discussion are generally provided, instead of pre-formed apertures, with pre-formed elongate slots, conical or prismatic depressions which are adapted to receive correspondingly shaped extensions of decorative elements which must, however, be positioned in the appropriate slots or depressions.

A still further disadvantage of prior art devices is that they are limited to primarily generate planar shapes for the production of generally two-dimensional images. While some of the prior art members which are mounted on a base or sheet project somewhat above the latter, there is generally no provision for providing a truly threedimensional image or effect by stacking the mountable elements along a direction normal to the plane of the 'base or sheet.

SUM-MARY OF THE INVENTION lt is an object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque which is not possessed of the above described disadvantages associated with comparable prior art plaques and toys.

lt is another object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque which is simple in construction and economical to manufacture.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque on which a plurality of bead-like elements are arranged to form a decorative design pattern.

It is yet another object of the present invention, in connection with the last-mentioned object, to provide an ornamental plaque wherein the bead-like elements may be positioned in any arbitrary location on a planar sheet of material on which the beads are mounted.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an ornamental plaque of the type under discussion which utilizes apertured beads through which extend headed pins whose pointed ends extend into a planar sheet forming the plaque.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque as above described which includes a planar sheet of pierceable material covered with a sheet of soft decorative material on which is provided an outline of a decorative design pattern corresponding to positions of the beads mounted thereon.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque which includes a base r sheet which is not provided with apertures, slots or depressions, but comprises a planar sheet of pierceable material which pointed pins can easily pierce to mount apertured beads through which the pins pass.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque which permits the mounting of one or more beads on pins utilized in forming a decorative design pattern, wherein a three-dimensional effect may be obtained by varying the number of beads which are mounted on different adjacent pins.

It is yet an additional object of the present invention to provide an ornamental plaque which may be constructed Without the utilization of specially prepared or manufactured elements and which does not require the utilization of adhesives or other connecting or mounting members besides pins.

It is further an additional object of the present invention to provide a method of forming an ornamental plaque in accordance with the present invention which is simple and economical to implement.

In order to achieve the above objects, as well as other objects which will become apparent hereafter, the present invention for an ornamental plaque comprises a generally planar sheet of pierceable material having two opposite major surfaces. A plurality of bead-like elements are arranged on one of said major surfaces to form a decorative design pattern. Pin means are provided which are associated with each bead-like element. 'Each pin means pierces and penetrates said sheet of material for maintaining an associated bead-like element mounted on said sheet of material. In this manner, the bead-like elements are maintained arranged in said decorative design pattern by the retaining action of said pin means.

A presently preferred class of materials from which the pierceable material is made from comprises cellular or foamed plastic materials.

According to the presently preferred embodiment, said bead-like elements comprise apertured beads and said pin means comprise headed pins having elongate stem portions extending through respective bead apertures. The head portions of the pins are of external dimensions greater than the transverse internal dimensions of the bead apertures. In this manner, the head of each pin abuts against a respective bead when the stem portion of the pin extends through the aperture of the bead and into said sheet of pierceable material. Said bead-like elements may comprise spherical apertured beads or multi-faceted beads. Alternately, said pin means may comprise pins each having an elongate stern portion having one end thereof adapted to pierce said sheet of pierceable material, and wherein each of said bead-like elements cornprises a decorative molded member fixed to the other end of a respective stern portion of the pin.

Advantageously, a decorative coating is provided on said one of said major surfaces which is visible and provides a decorative background for the spaces formed between adjacent beads as well as about the periphery of the design pattern. Said decorative coating may comprise a decorative finish or a soft material covering the major surface on which the beads are mounted.

[Any desired material, such as a cotton paper velour material, may be utilized.

According to another embodiment of the bead arrangement, at least some of the pins are associated with more than one bead. In this manner, more than one bead may be stacked on one pin to provide a multi-level threedimensional effect.

A further embodiment of the invention may be formed when adjacent beads in contact with said one major surface are positioned in a common plane and form spaces therebetween. In this case, further beads may be spaced 4 i above said common plane and have respective pins associated therewith extending into said sheet of pierceable material through said spaces. In this manner, said further beads substantially cover said spaces and additionally provide a three-dimensional or multi-layered effect.

The method in accordance with the present invention comprises a step of mounting beads on the surface of a sheet of pierceable material to form a decorative design. The mounting step comprises the step of piercing pins associated with respective beads into said sheet of pierceable material. When the beads are apertured, a step prior to piercing the pins into the sheet of material comprises the step of extending the Stearns of each pin through at least one bead.

-As above suggested, the method advantageously also comprises the step of covering the surface on which the beads are mounted with a decorative material prior to the bead mounting step.

Another feature of the method comprises the step of providing markings on said covering which define an outline corresponding to said decorative design.

When adjacent beads in Contact with the surface are positioned in a common plane and form spaces therebetween, the method of the invention may optionally comprise the further step of mounting further beads spaced above the common plane and having the pins associated therewith extending into the sheet of pierceable material through the spaces. In this manner, the further beads substantially cover said spaces.

4BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS With the above and additional objects and advantages in view, as will hereinafter appear, this invention comprises the devices, combinations and arrangements of parts hereinafter described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings of a preferred embodiment in which:

FIG. l is a top plan view of an ornamental plaque in accordance with the present invention, showing beads arranged on a planar sheet of pierceable material to form a decorative pattern and pins associated with the beads extending into the planar sheet;

FIG. 2 is a cross section of the ornamental plaque of FIG. l, taken alone line 2 2 in FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is an exploded View of the ornamental plaque of FIG. l, prior to assembly of the plaque and the mounting of the beads thereon;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a covering Sheet shown in FIG. 3, and further showing an outline of a design pattern which corresponds with the positions of the beads to be mounted on the planar sheet;

FIG. 5 is similar to FIG. 2 but showing two beads stacked on one pin;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a portion of an ornamental plaque similar to that of FIG. 1, showing four adjacent beads forming a space covered by a central bead whose associated pin extends through the space formed by the four adjacent beads;

FIG. 7 is a front elevational view of the planar sheet and beads shown in FIG. 6, showing the bead which covers the space formed by the four adjacent beads, the covering bead being spaced from the planar sheet t0 provide a three-dimensional effect; and

FIG. 8 is similar to FIG. 2, but showing a multifaceted bead instead of a spherical bead.

DETAILED 'DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring specifically to the drawings, wherein the same reference numerals have been utilized to designate similar or identical parts throughout, and first referring to FIGS. l and 2, an ornamental or decorative plaque in accordance with the present invention is generally designated by the reference numeral 10. The plaque 10 cornprises a generally planar sheet of pierceable material 12 which is provided with two opposite major surfaces. In

accordance with the presently preferred embodiment, the planar sheet 12 is made from any one of numerous foam or cellular plastic products which can be easily pierced by a pointed pin. Several examples of possible cellular plastics which may be utilized include expanded polystyrene foam. Cellular plastics which may be utilized are distributed under the brand names of Dylite and Cellofoam Foamed polyethylenes and urethanes, as well as numerous other cellular plastics may be utilized. Further, materials other than plastic may similarly be utilized as long as the same are easily pierceable by a pointed pin. One example of such another product comprises balsa Wood.

As can best be seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, the sheet of pierceable material 12 is generally planar and rectangular in configuration and is generally in the form of a plaque suitable for hanging on a wall.

The planar sheet is provided with a major surface 13 on which a decorative covering 14 is provided. The coV- ering 14 is provided with peripheral portions 16 which are folded over the ends of the planar sheet 12 and xed to the latter in any conventional manner. Advantageously, pins may be utilized which extend through the peripheral portions 16 into the planar sheet 12. The purpose of providing the covering 14 will be described hereafter. However, it should be mentioned that the covering 14 may be replaced by any other suitable decorative coating. Such a decorative coating may take the form of a decorative finish forming a part of and integrally made with the planar sheet 12. Alternately, a decorative coating may comprise a coating of paint or other comparable material.

When a covering 14 is provided, the same may be made from any relatively soft material which can be pierced by the pointed ends of pins. A decorative material of this type comprises a velour material one example of which is cotton paper velour material. Also, the covering 14 may comprise silk, burlap or felt. The decorative surface of the covering 14 is advantageously exposed. When a velour material is utilized the pile or napped surface resembling velvet is directed in the upward direction as viewed in FIG. 2.

To further enhance the aesthetic appearance of the ornamental plaque, a decorative ribbon 18 is advantageously provided which extends about and is connected to the periphery of the sheet of material 12. Aside from enhancing the looks of the plaque 10, the ribbon 18 covers whatever pins may have been utilized in connecting the end or peripheral portions 16 to the planar sheet 12. The manner of attaching the ribbon 18 will be described in connection with FIG. 3.

Still referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, an import-ant feature of the present invention is the provision of a plurality of bead-like elements shown in the drawings as beads 20, which are arranged on the major surface 13 to form a decorative design or pattern. The broad concept of the invention includes the utilization of pins each having an elongate stem portion having one end thereof adapted to pierce the sheet of material 12, and bead-like elements ycomprising decorative molded members xed to the other ends of respective stem portions of the pins. The construction just described is presently commercially available and generally designated as bulletin board pins. However, the presently preferred embodiment will be described in connection with apertured beads 20 which are held in position by heads 30 of pins having stem portions 30a thereof which extend through the apertures of the beads and pierce the covering 14 as well as the planar sheet 12. The utilization of apertured beads and pins in this manner represents a simple and economical way of constructing the ornamental plaque because of the ready availability of beads and pins of this type. Also, apertured beads come in numerous v-arieties, including colors and shapes and this further enhances the versatility with which decorative designs can be formed. As to be described hereafter yin connection with FIGS. 5-7, the utilization of apertured beads through which pins can extend also provides additional versatility in forming three-dimensional designs.

As suggested above, the beads 20 are arranged to provide an ornamental pattern. In FIG. 1, wherein a ower pattern -is illustrated7 groups of beads 21 are shown to form petals 23 of a flower. Beads 22 deline a stem llower and beads 24 and 27 designate leaves. As should be clear, the various groups of beads above described may be of different colors to simulate realistic colors of flowers, stems and leaves respectively.

The group of beads represented by the numeral 28 represent the pistel of a seed plant. While the heads of the pins 3i) may be metallic, as shown for the pins 30 extending through the vbeads 20, the pin heads 30b are shown colored. Utilizing pins having different colored heads further increases the versatility in forming decorative design patterns. The beads shown in IFIG. 1 are spherical in conrfiguration. ln iFlG. 8, a multi-faceted head is shown. 4Beads having any desired configurations, or any combinations thereof may be used to produce desired effects.

Although the present embodiment has been illustrated as including a flower pattern, it should be clear that this is not limiting of the present invention land that any other decorative pattern may be utilized.

The manner -in which the pins and beads cooperate is best illustrated in FIG. 2. Here, apertured beads 20 are shown to be retained by the pin heads 30 the stem portions ?atz of which extend to the apertures of the beads and pierce the planar sheeet 12. The stem portions 30a also pierce the covering 14 which, as described above, comprises a soft pierceable decorative material. The free ends of the stem portions 30a are advantageously pointed to facilitate the piercing of the planar sheet 12. However, depending upon the hardness or pierceability of the plan-ar sheet 12, the free ends of the stem portions 30a may be more or less pointed-this not forming a critical part of the present invention so long as such piercing is possible. According to the presently preferred embodiment, the stern portion 30a ends are pointed for two reasons. Firstly, pointed ends facilitate the insertion of the stem portions 39a to the planar sheet 12. Secondly, utilizing a pointed pin end yminimizes the destruction of the planar sheet surrounding the pinthis assuring a tight pressure fit which enhances the gripping `or retaining ability of the planar sheet of the step portions. Optionally, the stem portions 30a may rst be dipped in a suitable solvent which, when subsequently placed in the planar sheet 12, dissolves a portion thereof to form an integral bond with the stem portions. The particular solvents which are necessary to dissolve the various forms of cellular plastics or foams are Well known to those skilled in the art and are tabulated in standard reference texts. As suggested above, the particular nature of the planar sheet 12 is not critical for the purposes of the present invention, and, consequently, the nature of the `associated solvent therewith is similarly not critical.

Referring to FIG. 3, the ornamental plaque is shown prior to assembly and mounting of the beads thereon. The planar sheet 12 of `foam material or other suitable pierceable material has its dimensions selected to correspond with the desired dimensions of the completed plaque. The covering or cover sheet 14 has lateral dimensions which are greater than those of the planar sheet 12 to form end or peripheral portion 16 which extend beyond the sides of the planar sheet. The end or peripheral portions 16 are fold-able about fold lines 14a-14d to bring the end or peripheral portions 16 adjacent to the peripheral edge of the planar sheet 12. Once so folded, the end or peripheral portion 16 cmay be maintained in said positions by utilizing pins which pierce both the peripheral portions 16 as well as the peripheral edge yof the planar sheet 12.

A decorative ribbon 1:8 is placed about the peripheral edge of the planar sheet 12 and is selected to have sucient length to provide overlapping portions 18a, 18b once the ribbon 18 has been fully wrapped about the peripheral edge. As should be clear, the peripheral portions 16 are now covered by the ribbon 18 as are the pins which maintain the peripheral portions 16 in place. The ribbon 18 itself -is maintained in position by tightly wrapping the same about the peripheral edge of the planar sheet 12 and extending pins or `other suitable connecting means, such as staples, through the overlapping ends or portions 18a, 18h `and into the peripheral edge of the planar sheet 12. At this piont, the plaque is ready to receive beads having pins associated therewith which pins can be inserted into the planar sheet 12 at arbitrary locations along the major surface 13 of the foam sheet.

Referring to FIG. 4, the covering 14 is shown provided with markings which define an outline of a pattern which corresponds to the pattern of the beads when the latter are mounted on the plaque. The pattern illustrated in FIG. 4 is different than the pattern illustrated in iFIG. l.

The outline or design 60, in FIG. 4 comprises a plurality of markings which comprise lines 62 as well as areas 64. Typically, the markings are pre-formed on the covering 14 and the latter is mounted on the planar Sheet 12, as suggested in FIG. 3, so that the markings remain exposed after the plaque has been assembled. Each of the lines 62 or areas 64 may be given different reference designations on the covering itself or reference numerals which may be cross referenced to different bead colors or bead shapes or other constructions. Consequently, the outline 60 serves as a guide for mounting the beads 20. After all the beads have been mounted, the outline 60 is no longer visible and only the beads themselves define the decorative pattern or design.

As suggested above, the subject invention provides greater exibility in that three-dimensional decorative patterns may be generated. Referring to FIGS. -7 the means for forming such three-dimensional patterns is illustrated. Firstly, beads 50 may be stacked upon one stem portion 30b of a pin. Thus, beads 50a and 50b are stacked upon a possibly enlarged stem portion 30b which passes or extends through the apertures of the two stacked beads. Although only two beads are shown stacked, it should be clear that any number of beads may be so stacked as desired by making the length of the stem portion 30b sufficiently long.

As can best be seen in FIG. 1, groups of adjacent beads in contact with the covering 14 and positioned in a common plane form spaces therebetween. These spaces are generated because the beads are not fully complementary in shape and frequently the nature of the design does not permit the precise alignment of beads to eliminate the spaces. While it may be possible to minimize the spaces With prismatic or multi-faceted beads which are arranged or aligned in closely abutting relationship, this is not possible with spherical beads. An example of four adjacent spherical beads 52 are illustrated in FIG. 6 which define an adjacent space therebetween (not visible in FIG. 6) designated by the reference numeral 55 in FIG. 7. With such an arrangement, further beads 54 may be provided which are spaced above the plane generally defined by the beads in contact with the covering 14. The stem portion a which extends through the aperture of the bead 54 extends into the sheet of material 12 through the space 55. In so being positioned, the bead 54 substantially covers the space 55, as viewed from above in FIG. 6, and simultaneously provides a three-dimensional effect since the bead 54 nests between and above the plane of the beads 52.

Although not shown in the drawings, any suitable means may be provided on the major surface opposite the major surface 13 for mounting the ornamental plaque on a wall. Any loop or hooks or wire normally utilized in connection with hanging picture frames may similarly be utilized for hanging the plaque 10. Because the plaque 10 is, by the nature of the materials utilized and construction thereof, very light in weight, itis also possible to utilize numerous other types of hanging attachments for the plaque. For example, it is possible to utilize a chenille stem, also known as pipe cleaners, the free ends of which are urged into the pierceable planar sheet 12. The exposed portion of the chenille stem may now be arked into a loop sector suitable for engaging a nail on a wall. Although this in itself does not provide a very strong connection between the chenille stem and the planar sheet 12, this is normally sufficient to support the plaque 10. Further conventional means may be utilized for providing a more secure connection, such as by utilizing adhesive or staples which tend to retain the free ends of the chenille stem interiorly of the rear major surface of the plaque.

The above described ornamental plaque overcomes many of the above described disadvantages of prior such devices. Firstly, it is extremely simple and economical to manufacture. Secondly, the plaque may be manufactured from readily available materials. The beads themselves may be positioned at any arbitrarily locations along the major surface of the plaque without the limitations inherent in the prior art bases or mounting boards. Further, the resulting plaque in accordance with the present invention is both decorative and sufficiently aesthetic to make the same adaptable for hanging on a wall. The designs or patterns formed out of the beads on the plaque may be as simple or as complex as desired to thereby make the time with which the beads are mounted either minimal or substantial. Additionally, the plaque of the present invention may be utilized for educational purposes in addition to decorative purposes and, as described above, may either be utilized to originate original designs or, when utilized in conjucntion with outlines 60, may be utilized to form predetermined designs.

Numerous alterations of the structure herein disclosed will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. However, it is to be understood that the present disclosure relates to a preferred embodiment of the invention which is for purposes of illustration only and is not to be construed as a limitation of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An ornamental plaque, comprising .a generally planar sheet of pierceable material having two opposite major surfaces; a plurality of bead-like elements arranged on one of said major surfaces to form a decorative design pattern; and pin means associated with each bead-like element, each pin means piercing and penetrating said sheet of material for maintaining an associated bead-'like element mounted on said sheet of material, whereby said bead-like elements are maintained arranged in said decorative design pattern by the retaining action of said pin means.

2. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said sheet of pierceable material is made from cellular plastic.

3. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said bead-like elements comprise apertured beads, and said pin means comprise headed pins having elongate stem portions extending through respective bead apertures and having head portions of external dimensions greater than the transverse internal dimensions of the bead apertures, whereby the head of each pin abuts against a respective bead when the stern portion of the pin extends through the aperture of the bead and into said sheet of pierceable material.

4. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said bead-like elements comprise spherical apertured beads.

5. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said bead-like elements comprise multi-faceted apertured beads.

6. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said pin means comprise pins each having an elongate stem portion having one end thereof adapted to pierce said sheet of pierceable material, and wherein each of said bead-like elements comprises a decorative molded member fixed to the other end of a respective stem portion of a pin.

7. An ornamental plaque as dened in claim 1, wherein said -bead-like elements are positioned relative to each other to leave spaces therebetween, and further comprising a decorative coating provided on said one of said major surfaces, 4whereby said decorative coating is visible through said spaces and about the periphery of the design pattern and provides a decorative background therefor.

8. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 7, wherein said decorative coating comprises a decorative finish on said one of said major surfaces of said sheet of pierceable material.

9. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 7, wherein said coating comprises a relatively soft material covering said one of said major surfaces of said sheet of pierceable material; and means for securing said soft material to said sheet of pierceable material. l

10. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 9, wherein said soft material comprises a velour material.

11. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 9, wherein said soft material comprises cotton paper velour material.

12. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 7, further comprising markings on said coating which define an outline of said decorative design pattern, the positions of said bead-like elements corresponding to said outline.

13. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, further comprising a decorative ribbon extending about and connected to the periphery of said sheet of pierceable material.

14. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said bead-like elements comprise apertured beads, and wherein said pin means comprises elongate pins, at least some of said pins being associated with more than one bead, whereby more than one bead is stacked on one pin to provide a multi-level three-dimensional effect.

15. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, wherein said bead-like elements comprise apertured beads, said pin means comprise elongate pins, and wherein adjacent beads in contact with said one major surface are positioned in a common plane and form spaces therebetween, comprising further beads spaced above said common plane and having respective pins associated therewith extending into said sheet of pierceable material through said spaces, whereby said further beads substantially cover said spaces.

16. An ornamental plaque as defined in claim 1, further comprising connecting means on the other one of said 10- major surfaces for mounting the ornamental plaque on a wall.

17. A method of forming an ornamental plaque, comprising the steps of mounting beads on a surface of a sheet of pierceable material to form a decorative design, the mounting step comprising the step of piercing pins associated with respective beads into said sheet of pierceable material.

18. A method as defined in claim 17, wherein the beads are apertured, and further comprising the step of extending the stems of each pin through at least one y'bead prior to piercing the same into said sheet of material.

19. A method as defined in claim 17, further comprising the step of covering the surface on whichlthe beads are mounted with a decorative material prior to the bead mounting step.

20. A method as defined in claim 19, further comprising the step of providing markings on said covering which define an outline corresponding to said decorative design.

21. A method as defined in claim 17, further comprising the step of covering the surface on which the beads are mounted with a velour material on which is provided an outline ofthe decorative design.

22. A method as defined in claim 17, further comprising the step of fixing a decorative ribbon about the periphery of the sheet of pierceable material.

23. A method as defined in claim 17, wherein the adjacent beads in contact with the surface are positioned in a common plane and form spaces therebetween, and further comprising the step of mounting further beads spaced above 'the common plane having the pins associated therewith extending into the sheet of pierceable material through the spaces, whereby the further beads substantially cover said spaces.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,937,931 5/1960 Nugent 161-19 3,315,374 4/1967 Geratg 156-63 3,606,696 9/1971 Benman 46-17 3,748,752 7/ 1973 Quercetti 46-16 WILLIAM E. SCHULZ, Primary `Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3905848 *Sep 3, 1974Sep 16, 1975Louis Val WilliamsMethod of applying stones to sheet material
US4021936 *Aug 4, 1975May 10, 1977Stolzer Myron MPicture kit
US4139667 *Sep 19, 1977Feb 13, 1979Blue Joan WGemstone cloisonne
US4192084 *Sep 11, 1975Mar 11, 1980Riordan Sean S OAtomic model
US4275028 *Jan 24, 1980Jun 23, 1981Holiday Industries, Inc.Plastic ornament and method of making same
US5292255 *Nov 30, 1992Mar 8, 1994Goldwasser Solomon PBeaded picture kit and method
US7041182 *Feb 21, 2003May 9, 2006Sakura Hobby Craft Co., Ltd.Method of producing a decorative plate
US20130097049 *Oct 17, 2011Apr 18, 2013Schneur MinskySystem and method for a canvassed self healing bulletin board
EP0346304A2 *Jun 6, 1989Dec 13, 1989Corrado FrancioniA system of elements for the creation of graphic compositions
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/39, 427/180, 156/63, 434/96, 428/47
International ClassificationB44F7/00, B44C5/04, B44C3/00, B44C5/00, B44C3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB44C5/0446, B44F7/00, B44C3/12
European ClassificationB44C5/04L, B44C3/12, B44F7/00