Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3846919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateNov 8, 1973
Priority dateAug 21, 1973
Also published asDE2355636A1
Publication numberUS 3846919 A, US 3846919A, US-A-3846919, US3846919 A, US3846919A
InventorsMilotic M
Original AssigneeMilotic M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transformable footwear
US 3846919 A
Abstract
This invention relates to an article of footwear which may be transformed simply by substituting one of its elements. The shoe comprises three independent elements, constituted by a bottom comprising a wearing sole and a heel, an inner shoe assembly comprising an insole connected to a complete lining, and an outer dressing chosen from a series created for its variety, this outer dressing comprising a visible upper extended by a lower inset part to enable it to be fitted on the inner shoe assembly; projecting tongues belonging to the insole may be engaged in slots in the upper surface of the bottom to ensure the temporary but firm connection of this latter with the inner shoe assembly covered by the outer dressing. The invention is applicable to any article of foot wear.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 1111 Milotic Nov. 12, 1974 l l TRANSFORMABLE FOOTWEAR Primary Examiner-PatriclcD. Lawson [76] Inventor; Mm Mimic, 15, Avenue Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Alvin @nderbrafil, E8211, Montaigne, 94170 Le Perreux, Levwls Eshnger France v 22 Filed: Nov. 8, 1973 [57] ABSTRACT This. invention relates to an article of footwear which [2]] Appl' 413883 may be transformed simply by substituting one of its 1 elements. The shoe comprises three independent ele- [30] Foreign Application Priority Data ments, constituted by a bottom comprising a wearing Aug, 21 1973 France 73.30327 Sole and heel an inner shoe assembly Comprising an insole connected to a complete lining, and an outer [52] US. Cl 36/2.5 W dressing chosen from a Series Created for its-variety 51 Int. Cl. A43b this Outer (658mg Comprising a visible PPer [58] Field Of Search 36/2.5 R, 25 w, 2.5 c ended by a lower inset P to enable it to be fitted the inner shoe assembly; projecting tongues belonging to the insole may be engaged in slots in the upper surface of the bottom to ensure the temporary but firm References Clted connection of this latter with the inner shoe assembly UNITED STATES PATENTS covered by the outer dressing. The invention is appli- 2,552.943 5 1951 Danielius 36/25 w Cable to y article'of fool-Wear- 2,873,540 2/1959 Mur h 36/25 C 3,686,779 8/1972 Sach si 36/25 w 6 Clams 3 Drawmg TRANSFORMABLE FOOTWEAR The present invention relates to a shoe that may be transformed simply by substituting one of its elements.

Its object is to make it possible for the client to buy one pair of shoes only and, inspite of this, to be able to change its appearance by varying its form, colour, nature of covering, etc., simply by substituting one of the elements of each shoe by another element, by a manoeuvre which anyone could carry out.

Another object is to conserve for each shoe on the one hand its usual dimensions without exaggerating certain of them, for example the thickness of the sole and on the other hand its comfort and suppleness, particularly at the shank.

To achieve these ends and in accordance with the invention, the shoe comprises three independent components constituted by:

- a bottom comprising a wearing sole and a heel an inner shoe assembly comprising an insole integral with a complete lining and an outer dressing chosen from a series created for its variety, this outer dressing comprising a visible upper which is extended by a lower inset part to enable it to be fitted on the inner shoe assembly, dismountable connecting means being provided between the insole and the bottom.

According to a particularly advantageous embodiment, the insole of the inner shoe assembly is integral with three thin tongues located at the heel, waist and front respectively, the first two being directed rearwardly and the third frontwardly, whilst the bottom defines three housings accessible on its upper surface by three slots for receiving the tongues of the inner shoe assembly by bending said latter downwardly at both ends.

According to a preferred but non-limiting embodiment, the tongues are cut, so as to project slightly, from a resistant but flexible sheet, preferably made of steel, fixed beneath the insole of the inner shoe assembly; another sheet, preferably of the same nature, is fixed to the bottom 'so that the slots that its presents are located above recesses made in this bottom for giving access to the above-mentioned housings for the tongues; the upper of the outer dressing is integral with a supple bottom having windows for the passage of the tongues of the inner shoe assembly.

This particular structure of the shoe presents numerous other advantages.

In particular, being given, on the one hand, that the dressing is the only support for the variation of the models and on the other hand that this dressing is relatively inexpensive, the consumers may follow the fashion and adapt their shoes to their attire without involving too manyexpenses.

In addition, the care of the shoe is limited to the minimum, it is not expensive to replace this dressing, and shoe-mending costs are reduced.

Moreover, the shoe is perfectly water-tight since there is a gap between the bottom and the insole of the inner shoe assembly.

The invention will be more readily understood on reading the following non-limiting description given with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGS. 1 to 3 are perspective views shown synoptically with respect to each other and illustrating the various elements constituting the shoe.

The shoe is composed of three independent elements: a bottom 1, an inner shoe assembly 2 and a dressing 3.

The bottom 1 (FIG. 3), whatever its mode of manufacture and nature of the material used (leather, rubber, synthetic material, etc.), presents a sole 4 and a heel 5, a shank (not shown in the drawing being in this example incorporated in said bottom.)

The inner shoe assembly 2 (FIG. 1) which may be made of skin or breathable synthetic material, comprises a lining 6 integral with an insole 7. Of course, for this inner shoe assembly to take the shape of the foot perfectly, but still to be easily pulled on, it is provided at the instep with a facing made of elastic material.

The bottom 1 and the inner shoe assembly 2 must be connected by means such that they permit any later dismantling, on condition that said dismantling be voluntary, but which conserve the usual qualities of comfort and movement of a shoe and which cannot accidentally come apart particularly when the foot is bent.

In the example shown, a strip 8 (FIG. 1) is interposed between the insole 7 and an edge 9 obtained by folding back the lining 6; the strip 8 is connected to the edge 9 and the insole 8 by gluing and by means of rivets l0 and possibly by parts 11 made of the same material as the inner shoe assembly.

Similarly, the upper surface of the bottom 1 is connected by rivets 12 to a steel strip 13 (FIG. 3).

To ensure that the inner shoe assembly 2 is connected with the bottom 1, the strip 8 has three thin tongues 14 located at the heel, waist and front respectively; these tongues are obtained by cutting the strip along three sides and by slightly bending along the fourth side; thus, the tongues project slightly downwards; the tongue of the front being directed forwards whilst the tongues of the heel and the waist are orientated rearwardly.

The strip 13 of the bottom has three slots 15 located opposite the tongues; one of the edges of each slot is sunken and the other is raised, so as to facilitate the penetration of the corresponding tongue. In addition, the upper surface of the bottom is hollowed out so as to make housings between said latter and the strip 13 whichreceive the tongues via the slots 15.

It is a simple matter to assembly the inner shoe assembly 2 on the bottom 1. Infact, after having engaged the two rear tongues 14 in the corresponding slots 15, it is sufficient to bend the insole downwardly at both ends, then, when the free end of the front tongue is in the slot located opposite, to flatten said insole until said front tongue has completely penetrated into its housmg.

It is important to note that when walking, running, jumping, going upstairs, etc., the user, on bending his foot, bends the insole 7 and bottom 1 upwardly at both ends. Under these conditions, it is impossible for the tongues 14 to come out involuntarily.

Of course, the strips 8 and 13 are not indispensable. Any technique enabling tongues 14 to be flexibly and solidly made beneath the insole 7, and housings accessible by slots 15 to be made in the bottom 1, is perfectly suitable for carryingout the invention. For example, the insole and at least the upper surface of the bottom may be made from a laminate of synthetic material and fibre glass fabric.

All the outer dressings 3 (FIG. 2) that may be assembled on the shoe assembly 1-2 comprise, whatever their final form, colour, decoration, etc., an upper 16 connected to a supple bottom 17 having windows 18 for the passage of the tongues 14.

Since an outer dressing 3 is fitted onto the inner shoe assembly 2, it is sufficient to proceed as indicated hereinbefore for temporarily but firmly connecting said inner shoe assembly with the bottom 1; the bottom 17 of the outer dressing is then interposed between the insole 7 of the inner shoe assembly and the top surface of the bottom 1.

The invention is not limited to the embodiment that has just been described, since various modifications may be made thereto without departing from its scope.

In particular, the dismountable locking means may be of another type, for example constituted by thin lateral straps.

The invention is applicable to footwear.

What I claim is:

l. A shoe which is transformable simply by substituting one of its elements, wherein said shoe comprises three independent components constituted by a bottom comprising a wearing sole and a heel, an inner shoe assembly comprising an insole integral with a complete lining, and an outer dressing chosen from a series created for its variety, this outer dressing comprising a visible upper extended by a lower inset part to allow it to be fitted ontothe inner shoe assembly and wherein dismountable connecting means are provided between the insole and the bottom.

2. A shoe as claimed in claim 1, wherein the insole of the inner shoe assembly includes three thin tongues located at the heel, waist and front respectively, the first two being directed rparwardly and the third forwardly, and the bottom defines three housings on the top surface thereof accessible through three slots formed therein for receiving the tongues of the inner shoe assembly by bending said inner shoe assembly downwardly at its opposite ends.

3. A shoe as claimed in claim 2, wherein the tongues are cut, so as to project slightly, from a resistant but flexible sheet fixed beneath the insole of the inner shoe assembly and another flexible sheet having said slots formed therein is fixed to the bottom so that the slots that it presents are located above recesses made in this bottom, giving access to the above-mentioned housings for the tongues.

4. A shoe as claimed in claim 1, wherein the upper of the outer dressing is integral with a supple bottom having windows for the passage of the tongues of the inner shoe assembly.

5. A shoe as claimed in any one of claims 1, wherein a shank is incorporated in the bottom and/or in the insole of the inner shoe assembly.

6. A shoe as claimed in claim 3 wherein said flexible sheets are formed from flexible steel sheets.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2552943 *Apr 30, 1948May 15, 1951Jones & Malyon LtdShoe having a detachable upper
US2873540 *Aug 2, 1955Feb 17, 1959Ramey Murphy VenusShoe with changeable elements
US3686779 *Dec 21, 1970Aug 29, 1972Sachs MaxwellFootwear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4267649 *May 7, 1979May 19, 1981Smith Gardner MInterchangeable shoe
US5083385 *Sep 5, 1990Jan 28, 1992Halford Catherine J PFootwear having interchangeable uppers
US6915596Jan 21, 2003Jul 12, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US6931766Nov 12, 2003Aug 23, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear with a separable foot-receiving portion and sole structure
US7076890May 19, 2005Jul 18, 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US7171767Nov 7, 2005Feb 6, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US7200955Jun 4, 2004Apr 10, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a sole structure with compressible inserts
US7290357Apr 1, 2005Nov 6, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with an articulated sole structure
US7392605Dec 18, 2006Jul 1, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US7444763May 30, 2006Nov 4, 2008Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US7451557Jun 4, 2004Nov 18, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a removable midsole element
US7607241Oct 9, 2007Oct 27, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with an articulated sole structure
US7730636Jul 28, 2004Jun 8, 2010Nike, Inc.Cleated article of footwear and method of manufacture
US7730637Jun 30, 2008Jun 8, 2010Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US7752775Jul 13, 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US7770306Aug 10, 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
US7814682 *Sep 9, 2008Oct 19, 2010Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US7950091May 31, 2011Nike, Inc.Cleated article of footwear and method of manufacture
US8209883Jul 3, 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
US8303885Sep 8, 2005Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US8474155Nov 17, 2008Jul 2, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with outsole web and midsole protrusions
US8567096May 2, 2011Oct 29, 2013Adidas International Marketing B.V.Modular shoe
US8813387Dec 3, 2012Aug 26, 2014Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US8919016Jun 4, 2013Dec 30, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with outsole web and midsole protrusions
US8959802Sep 13, 2012Feb 24, 2015Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US20030069807 *Oct 24, 2002Apr 10, 2003Lyden Robert M.Customized article of footwear and method of conducting retail and internet business
US20040148803 *Jan 21, 2003Aug 5, 2004Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US20050097781 *Nov 12, 2003May 12, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear with a separable foot-receiving portion and sole structure
US20050268490 *Jun 4, 2004Dec 8, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a sole structure with compressible inserts
US20050268491 *Jun 4, 2004Dec 8, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a removable midsole element
US20060021255 *Jul 28, 2004Feb 2, 2006Auger Perry WCleated article of footwear and method of manufacture
US20060061012 *Sep 8, 2005Mar 23, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US20060213088 *May 30, 2006Sep 28, 2006Nike, Inc.Footwear with separable upper and sole structure
US20070094896 *Dec 18, 2006May 3, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a stretchable upper and an articulated sole structure
US20090000149 *Sep 9, 2008Jan 1, 2009Nike, Inc.Footwear with Separable Upper and Sole Structure
US20090126230 *Nov 17, 2008May 21, 2009Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear With Outsole Web and Midsole Protrusions
US20100205756 *Apr 28, 2010Aug 19, 2010Nike, Inc.Cleated article of footwear and method of manufacture
US20110000104 *Jan 6, 2011Nike, Inc.Footwear with Separable Upper and Sole Structure
WO1992002155A1 *Jul 25, 1991Feb 20, 1992Catherine Jeanne Paule HalfordShoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/100
International ClassificationA43B3/24, A43B13/28, A43B13/00, A43B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/28, A43B3/24
European ClassificationA43B13/28, A43B3/24