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Publication numberUS3846921 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateMay 31, 1973
Priority dateJun 6, 1972
Also published asCA980111A1, DE2328642A1
Publication numberUS 3846921 A, US 3846921A, US-A-3846921, US3846921 A, US3846921A
InventorsKobayashi K
Original AssigneeOnitsuka Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spiked shoe
US 3846921 A
Abstract
The present invention relates to a spiked shoe comprising a sole provided with a plural number of spikes on the lower surface thereof, and an upper mounted on said sole, wherein the effective part of each spike comprises a parallel element having uniform cross section in form and area through the length thereof, the bottom face of said parallel element being of a shape cut by a plane vertical to the axis of the spike.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent '1 1 1 Kobayashi Nov. 12, 1974 SPIKED SHOE 3,552,043 1/1971 Mofl'a 36/67 1) 3,559,308 2/l97l Bcrnier 3(l67 A [751 Inventor: Kazumsh' MbaYash'i 3,760,514 9/1973 Egtvcdt .L .1 171/07 R [73] Assignee: Onitsuka C0., Ltd., Kobe City,

Japan Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson [22] Filed: May 31, 1973 211 Appl. No.: 365,547

571 ABSTRACT [30] Foreign Application Priority Data June 6, 1972 Japan 47-65978 The present invention relates to a spiked shoe com- Dec. 27, 1972 Japan 47-l48345 prising a sole provided with a plural number of spikes on the lower surface thereof, and an upper mounted [52] US. Cl 36/59 R on said sole, wherein the effective part of each spike [51 Int. Cl A43b 23/28 om rises a parallel element having uniform cross secl i Fleld of Search 36/59 67 67 A. 67 D. tion in form and area through the length thereof, the 36/67 B bottom face of said parallel element being of a shape cut by a plane vertical to the axis of the spike. [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures 3,529,370 9/1970 Bernier et a1, 36/59 R PATENTEDNUV 12 I974 SNEH .1 0F 3 FIG.

I unnv 12 m4 3.846321 sum 20? 3 SPIKED SHOE The present invention relates to a spiked shoe for athletes.

A spiked shoes for athletes of the conventional type is usually providedwith a number of spikes on the sole thereof and the effective part of each spike is usually of a circular conical shape, and therefore said spike is stuck into a running track from the surface to the innerpart thereof so as to make necessary resistance force to slide slipping. If a running track comprises multiple- Iayered soil in the conventional use, such as of an entout-cas layer, a cinder layer, a gravel layer and sand layer, spikes are deeply stuck into the track, so that kicking action of an athletes foot is counteracted,'and more energy is required for pulling out said stuck spikes, or the track surface is damaged, which causes so-called ground condition to go bad. I

Further, all-weather ground has come into frequent use lately. For a track in such a kind of ground,resilient rubbery sheet formed of macromolecular compound is integrally mounted on a concrete floor. In fact, however, athletes still use spiked shoes of conventional type with circular conical spikesthere. I

Resilient rubbery sheet formed of macromolecular compound has the property of being buoyant and resilient when rather lightly pressed,,and rigid when pressed hard. For example, in a sprint race, a weight 3 times as.

heavy as a running sprinters'weight is put on the track, and further, in the take-off of hop, step, and jump a weight 7 to 9 times as heavy as a racers weight is put thereon. So, it is necessary to use spiked shoes suitable for the subject track after due consideration of such a character thereof.

Especially, if spiked shoes of conventional type with circular conical spikes are used on a track of resilient rubbery sheet formedof macromolecular-compound, resistance force increases in pulling out the spikes once stuck into the track. Therefore, an athlete needs more energy for lifting-his legs, so that the essential function of spiked shoes is lost. Further, marks left on the resil ient rubbery sheet by saidspikes are not healed of itself.

Consequently spiked shoesfor such a track requested by an athlete as well as a ground owner are such as can catch the ground surface well, and has strong resistance to side slipping, and does not damage the track by leav ing spike marks thereon.

The main object of the present invention is to eliminate above-mentioned disadvantages of the conventional spiked shoes.

Another object of the invention is to provide spiked shoes especially suitable for a track of a resilient rubbery sheet formed of macromolecular compound, for example, used for a all-weather ground.

In a spiked shoe of an embodiment of the present invention, a number of spikes are mountedon the lower sole thereof, and the effective part of each spike comprises a parallel element, the lower end or the grounding end of which is of a shape cut by a plane vertical to said parallel element.

In the present specification and claims the word parallel element is intended to mean an element with substantially uniform cross section in form and area Comparing a spiked shoe of the present invention with a conventional spiked shoe having tapered spikes, resistance force to side slipping, which is necessary for running and will exist onthe grounding end of each through the length thereof, such as a circular cylinder element, a polygonal pillar element or the like.

spike in running, is obtained in the former shoe by shorter penetration of spikes into a track.

Further, when spiked shoes of the present invention are used on a resilient rubbery track formed of macromolecular compound, pressure (namely, reaction force exerting upwardly from the grounding face of each spike against the depressing pressure of the athletes 3 foot) is putuniformlyon the whole bottom face or grounding face of each spike, so that each spike depresses and touches the track with temporally denting the surfacev thereof, and no spike marks are left thereon.

Further spiked shoes of the present invention are so comfortable for an athlete to wear that he can show his ability to the full in a race.

In a spiked shoe of another embodiment of the present invention, the effective part of each spike comprises a parallel element defining the lower portion thereof and an enlarged element integrally extending upwardly from said parallel element, on the lower end of said enlarged element is provided a resistance face for checking unnecessarily deep penetration of the spike into a track. Therefore if a track is hard; spikes of said embodiment of the present invention never penetrate unnecessarily deep thereinto, and so, effective kicking action is not reduced and an extra energy is not required for pulling out the stuck spikes.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent upon a reading of the detailed description of embodiments thereof with reference to the appended drawings.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing the front part of a spiked shoe according to the present invention, wherein the lower surface of the sole is seen being provided a. plural number of spikes in place;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are vertical sectional views each showing spikes in connectionwith shoe sole, wherein each spike is provided with a parallel element of circularcylinder shape;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a spike having a parallel element of a square-pillar shape;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing a spike having a parallel element of a hexagonal-pillar shape;

FIG. 6 is a diagram showing the relation between the horizontal component of an athletes kicking force and a propelling force for driving him forward in a circula conical spike of the conventional type;

FIG. 7 is a diagram showing the relation between the horizontal component of an athletes kicking force and a propelling force for driving him forward in a pillarshaped spike of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing a spike of the present invention provided with a parallel element of circular-cylinder shape and an enlarged element of similarly circular-cylinder shape having a resistance face;

FIG. 9 is a vertical sectional view' showing the spike of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 and FIG. 12 are perspective views showing modifications of the spike of FIG. 8', and

. FIG. 11, FIG. 13 and FIG. 14 are elevational views showing other modifications of the spike of FIG. 8.

of a spiked shoe or synthetic resin, an upper 11 mounted on .said sole 7 10, and a plural number of circular-cylindrical spikes l2 fixed to the lower surface of the sole l0.

As seen in FIG. 2, each spike 12 is vertically fixed through a supporting member 13 to the sole 10. The

supporting member 13 comprises a tubular partl4 with threaded inside and an annular anchoring flange l5, and is entirely embedded in the sole 10. Each spike 12, at least in the effective part thereof (the length of said effective part is shown by the designation E.L.), forms a circular-cylindrical parallel element 12A. The upper end portion of said parallel element 12A is threaded by a plane vertical to the axis thereof, and therefore is substantially parallel with the ground when the shoe is used.

The above-mentioned supporting member 13 for connecting the spike 12 to the sole may be replaced by any other kind of suitable means. For example, a spike as shown in FIG.-3 is, on the upper end thereof, provided with an anchoring flange 12b formed integral with the spike, and the upper portion of the spike including said flange 12b is embedded in the sole 10.

Further, a parallel element 12A of a spike is not limited to the above-mentioned circular-cylindrical one but may be shaped in a pillar with an elliptical, rectangular, polygonal or other cross section. For example, in FIGS. 4 and 5, are shown parallel elements 112A, 212A with a rectangular or a hexagonal section respectively.

Further, the bottom face of a parallel element when used is not necessarily parallel with the ground but may be inclined relative thereto with a suitable angle.

FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate a spike of the conventional type or of the present inventionrespectively, each penetrating into a track T formed of macromolecular compound when the athlete is running.

As shown in the two drawings, in either case, the hon.

izontal component of force F of the athletes kicking force horizontally exerts through the spike. 12 upon the track T.

In case of a spike of the conventional type as shown in FIG. 6 (for example, the conical angle thereof being assumed the horizontal component F of the athletes kicking force is decomposed into two forces F F 2 each in different direction, and the force F exerts upon the vertical face of the recess formed on the track and screwed into said supporting member 13. And the bottom face of said parallel element is of a shape cut T (F F cos 0), while the force F is the force upforce F. Consequently, the horizontal component F of v the athletes kicking force in itself is equal to a propel ling force F M for driving the athlete forward.

As above-mentioned, comparing the two examples with each other FRI=FCO S2 0 FR2=F From the formula (I) and (2) From the formula (3) above. it can be said that resistance force to side slipping of a spike provided with a parallel element according to the present invention is larger than that of a conventional spike of a circularconical shape.

Further, as apparently seen in FIGS. 6 and 7, a spike of the present invention only temporally dents the track surface while the conventional spike is stuck into the track and leaves marks thereon foreover.

FIGS. 8- 12 illustrate the other embodiments of the present invention, wherein a spike is connected to the sole in the same manner as in the above-mentioned embodiment.

Referring especially to FIGS. 8 and 9, the effective part of'a spike comprises a parallel element 12, and an enlarged element 12, extending upwardly from said parallel element. Said parallel element and said enlarged element are both of a circular-cylinder shape, but the diameter of cross section of the latter is larger than that of the former. Further the enlarged element has an annular resistance face 20 for checking unnecessarily deep penetration of the spike into a track. And the bottom face of the parallel element 12A is of a shape cut by a plane vertical to the axis thereof.

The upper end portion of the spike 12 is threaded and screwed into a threaded portion inside a supporting member 13 provided with an anchoring flange 15, said means 13 being embedded in the sole 10.

The spike 12 can be connected to the sole 10 by various kinds of suitable means, as mentioned in the description relative to the first embodiment of the present invention.

Spikes illustrated in FIGS. 10 13 are various modifications of the spike shown in FIG. 8.

- The effective part 12A of a spike illustrated in FIG. 10 comprises a parallel element ll2 'having a rectangular cross section, the bottom face of said parallel element being parallel with the lower surface of the sole 10, and an enlarged element 112, shaped in a circular cylinder and formed integral with said parallel element 112, at the lower end of-said enlarged element 112,

being provided a registance face for checking unnecessarily deep penetration of the spike into a track.

The effective part 12A of a spike illustrated in FIG. 11 comprises, similarly to the spikes shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, a parallel. element 212, and an enlarged element 212 extending upwardly from said parallel element 212,, and having a resistance face 220 at the lower end thereof. However, said resistance face 220 is not perpendicular to the vertical axis of the spike, but is concaved.

Further, the effective part 12A of a spike shown in FIG. 12 comprises a circular-cylindrical parallel element 312, and an enlarged element 312,, provided with a resistance face 320 at the lower end thereof, wherein said enlarged element 3.12 includes a parallel part with uniform cross section both in form and area through the length thereof, and an expanded part of a frusto-conical shape with diameter gradually increasing downwardly, said expanded part extending downwardly from said parallel part.

In any one of above-mentioned spikes, the bottom face or the grounding face of the parallel elements 112 212, 312, is not necessarily perpendicular to the axis thereof.

. The bottom face of the parallel element 412 of a spike illustrated in FIG. 13 is a little inclined relative to a plane vertical to the axis of the spike, and the enlarged element 412, is provided with an inclined resistance face 420 at the lower end thereof. Further, the effective part 12A of a spike illustrated in FIG. 14 comprises a parallel element 512, of a circular-cylinder shape and an enlarged element 512 of a frustoconical shape, said two elements being coaxially connected to each other.

A spike, the effective part of which comprises parallel element and an enlarged element integral with and extending upwardly from said parallel element, prevents unnecessarily deep penetration thereof into a track, so that effective kicking action of an athletes foot is not counteracted and at the same time unnecessary is extra energy for pulling out spikes stuck into the track.

What I claim is:

1. A spiked shoe comprising a sole and an upper mounted on the sole, the sole having a lower surface, a plurality of spikes extending from the lower surface of the sole, each spike having a longitudinal axis and an effective part which extends between the lower surface of the sole and the lower end of the spike, the effective part of each spike comprisingan upper part extending axially downwardly from the lower surface of the sole and a lower part extending axially downwardly from the upper part and formed integrally therewith, each of the upper and lower parts extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the spike and having a uniform cross section throughout the length thereof, the cross section of the upper part being larger than the cross section of the lower part, the lower end of each lower part having a planar surface crossing the axis of the spike and the lower end of each upper part having a resistance face extending outwardly beyond the lower part for checking unnecessarily deep penetration of the spike into the track.

2. The shoe of claim 1 in which the planar surface of each lower part extends perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the spike.

3. The shoe of claim 1 in which the resistance face of each spike extends perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the spike.

4. The shoe of claim I in which the planar surface of each lower part and the resistance face of each upper part extend perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the spike.

5. The shoe of claim 1 in which the upper and lower parts of each spike having circular cross sections.

6. A spiked shoe comprising a sole and an upper mounted on the sole, the sole having a lower surface, a plurality of spikes extending from the lower surface of the sole, each spike having a longitudinal axis and an effective part which extends between the lower surface of the sole and the lower end of the spike, the effective part of each spike comprising an upper part extending axially downwardly from the lower surface of the sole and a lower part extending axially downwardly from the upper part and formed integrally therewith, the lower part extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the spike and having a uniform cross section throughout the length thereof, the lower end of each lower part having a planar surface crossing the axis of the spike, the upper part including a first portion extending axially downwardly from the lower surface of the sole and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the spike and having a uniform cross section through the length thereof and an expanded portion between said first portion and the lower part of the spike extending outwardly beyond the first portion, the lower end of the expanded portion having a resistance face extending outwardly beyond the lower part for checking unnecessarily deep penetration of the spike into the track.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3529370 *Nov 8, 1968Sep 22, 1970Wright & Co Inc E TCleated anchor plate
US3552043 *May 1, 1969Jan 5, 1971Moffa Louis JWear-resisting spikes for shoes
US3559308 *Sep 17, 1969Feb 2, 1971Wright & Co Inc E TCleated outsole
US3760514 *Nov 9, 1971Sep 25, 1973Wolverine World Wide IncRivet spike for a shoe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3928881 *Jul 5, 1974Dec 30, 1975Dassler AdolfMethod and mould for the manufacture of a plastic sole for shoes
US4083126 *Nov 30, 1976Apr 11, 1978The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc.Studded boots for firefighters
US4292746 *Apr 25, 1979Oct 6, 1981Delaney Glen JLight weight insulated athletic shoe
US5184275 *Dec 21, 1989Feb 2, 1993Hughes Aircraft CompanyHeel grounding device
US6186000 *Apr 22, 1999Feb 13, 2001Mizuno CorporationApparatus and method for measuring shearing stress distribution on the sole of a spiked shoe
US6948264Jan 29, 2002Sep 27, 2005Lyden Robert MNon-clogging sole for article of footwear
US8695234 *Dec 27, 2010Apr 15, 2014Han-Ching WuAnti-slip spike structure
US20120159816 *Dec 27, 2010Jun 28, 2012Han-Ching WuAnti-slip spike structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/164
European ClassificationA43C15/16C1