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Publication numberUS3846948 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateNov 16, 1970
Priority dateJun 9, 1969
Publication numberUS 3846948 A, US 3846948A, US-A-3846948, US3846948 A, US3846948A
InventorsDallen J
Original AssigneeStandard Products Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glazing system
US 3846948 A
Abstract
A glazing system for large glass windows wherein the opening is framed by a narrow surface coplanar with the opening and an outer surface perpendicular to the plane of the opening. The perpendicular surface has a channel therein spaced from the coplanar surface into which a portion of a resilient stop is forced. The stop has an outer portion including a window engaging lip and a perpendicular surface engaging lip, the arrangement being such that the outer portion is rotated toward and into pressure engagement with the glass by the engagement of the perpendicular engaging lip with its surface as the stop is forced into the channel. A tacky semi-compressible sealant placed between the glass and the coplanar surfaces is thus placed under compression. Shims prevent over compression. The stop engages the bottom of the channel when fully inserted so as to be accurately located and provided a straight sight line.
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[ Nov. 12, 1 974 GLAZING SYSTEM [75] Inventor: John A. Dallen, Port Clinton, Ohio [73] Assignee: The Standard Products Company, Cleveland, Ohio [22] Filed: Nov. 16, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 89,954

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 831,498, June 9,

i969, abandoned.

[52] U.S. Cl 52/400, 52/62, 52/396 [51] Int. Cl E04b 1/62 [58] Field of Search 52/204, 396, 397, 400, 52/403, 62, 402

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,056,024 9/1936 Stuart 52/400 2,248,297 7/1941 Chaffee 52/400 2,787,347 4/l957 Henderson 52/400 2,877,5l5 3/1959 Haas 52/402 2,979,788 4/196l Richardson 52/400 3,254,46l 6/l966 White et al. 52/397 3,344,573 10/1967 Martin et a]. 52/400 3,500,603 3/1970 Strack 52/403 3,5l2,3l8 5/1970 Turner 52/62 8/1970 Sarvay 52/396 5/l97l Eichman ..52/397 Primary Examiner-Henry C. Sutherland Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Meyer, Tilberry & Body [5 7 ABSTRACT A glazing system for large glass windows wherein the opening is framed by a narrow surface coplanar with the opening and an outer surface perpendicular to the plane of the opening. The perpendicular surface has a channel therein spaced from the coplanar surface into which a portion of a resilient stop is forced. The stop has an outer portion including a window engaging lip and a perpendicular surface engaging lip, thearrange ment being such that the outer portion is rotated toward and into pressure engagement with the glass by the engagement of the perpendicular engaging lip with its surface as the stop is forced into the channel. A tacky semi-compressible sealant placed between the glass and the coplanar surfaces is thus placed under compression. Shims prevent over compression. The stop engages the bottom of the channel when fully inserted so as to be accurately located and provided a straight sight line.

8 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures GLAZING SYSTEM This application is a continuation-in-part application of now abandoned parent application Ser. NO.

831,498; filed June 9, 1969.

has been, and continues tobe, a popular architectural concept. Buildings with concrete walls are to be found not only in high rise office buildings but also in low cost individual housing. However, some difficulty has always been experienced in providing for the installation of windows in such concrete walls. For example, it is not unusual to experience chipping or spalling of the concrete around the window openings. Moreover,

.voids or protrusions in the concretein the areas of the openings frequently occur thereby making it difficult to install and seal a panel in the opening. Still further, it is both difficult and more expensive to employ forming techniques which assure the attainment of uniform dimensions around the window opening in a concrete wall.

Prior art glazingsystems have normally employed some form of astop or abutment which, in combination with conventional shims, setting blocks, wedges and sealants, function to seal and hold the glass in the wall opening. Typically, the stop or abutment is some form of a metal frame which is removable so that the glass panel may be inserted in the wall opening and thereafter secured to the sash or sill to maintain the sealant in engagement with the surface of the glass. As can be appreciated, removal of the glass first requires the removal of the stop member. In addition, the stop member itself comprises a substantial item of cost and also normally involves substantial labor costs for its installation. Still further, the stops normally are of a fabricated metallic design and, consequently, the configuration of the stop is restricted to the available forming techniques. This limitation in turn acts as a limitation on the configuration of windows which may be designed.

The present invention contemplates a new and improved glazing system which overcomes all of the above referred to difficulties and others and provides a window glazing system which involves a minimum number of pieces in order to provide an effective window seal which is both simple and economical to manufacture and install.

In accordance with the present invention, the surfaces defining the opening include a first narrow surface coplanar with the opening, a second surface disposed outwardly from the center of the opening whichis generally perpendicular to the plane of the opening,

and a channel spaced from the first surface facing the center of the opening. A tacky and partially flowable sealant material is then placed on the coplanar surface and the panel which is to fill the opening is pressed thereagainst. An elastomeric stop member is provided having a channel insertion portion and a wider sealing portion which remains outside of the channel, the arrangement being such that when the channel insertion portion is inserted in the channel, a first surface on the sealing portion engages the generally perpendicular surface and rotates or moves a second surface on the sealing portion into pressure engagement with the panel to place the sealant under a constant, but uniform and steady, pressure. Shims are provided to prevent the sealant from compressing excessively. The length of the channel inserting portion is preferably such that it bottoms in the channel so that the sight line of the stop will be positively located and straight relative to the periphery of the window. The channel insertion portion is provided with laterally extending fins which flex and collapse so as to permit ready insertion of the insertion portion into the channel but expand on removal soas to prevent ready removable therefrom.

The sealant ispreferrably of a material which does not dry or harden or set throughout the expected life of the installation. Also, it preferrably has tacky surface characteristics such that when compressed between two surfaces, it will adhere tenanciously thereto so as to provide a water and air tight seal between the coplanar surface and the surface of the panel. The material of the sealant is in tape or strip form and is preferably a semiplastic having flow characteristics which prevent it from flowing under the force of gravity when in position in a vertical or an upside down horizontal position, but yet will flow to a limited extent under pressures exerted thereon by the elasticity of the stop member pressing against the other surface of the panel.

The stop member is preferrably of an elastomeric extruded material such as neoprene which, when flexed from its normal unstressedshape, will continue to exert pressures on its restraining surfaces attempting to return to its unstressed state.

The surfaces defining the opening may be the concrete itself as in the poured and hardened condition, but in accordance with a more limited aspect aspect of the invention, the glazing system contemplates a specially designed reglet adaptedto be cast directly into the concrete wall so that at the reglet defines the window opening. Thus, the reglet includes a first surface adapted to be generally perpendicular to the plane of the opening, a sealing surface adapted to be coplanar with the plane of the opening, and a second surface adapted to be perpendicular to the plane of the opening and outwardly therefrom which includes a channel therein spaced from the sealing surface.

The principal object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved glazing system for sealing windows in concrete walls which overcomes all of the difficulties of the prior art and which is simple in constructing economical to manufacture and readily installed.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved glazing system wherein an elastomeric stop member is so arranged with its supporting surfaces that it is moved into pressure engagement with the glass as it is installed.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved glazing system wherein the stop member bottoms in a channel which surrounds the opening so as to align the outer surfaces of the stop member to maintain them in a straight position relative to the peripheries of the window opening.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved glazing system for windows and concrete walls wherein a semi-plastic tacky sealant may be used for the purpose of sealing the window in place which sealant will always be under a generally constant and uniform pressure.

I Another object of the invention is the provision of a new and improved glazing system which is comprised of only four components; namely, a reglet, a sealant, a shim and an elastomeric stop member.

The glazing system is equally adapted for use in walls other than concrete. For example, the system may be adapted to metal framing or wood framing or it may be used with material such as limestone or the like.

The invention may take physical form in certain parts and arrangements of parts, preferred embodiments which will be described in detail in this specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings which are a part hereof and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of a panel installed in a concrete wall illustrating a preferred embodiment of the glazing system of the instant invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 1 illustrating the installation of a'panel in a wall of cut limestone or the like;

FIG. 3 is a front elevationsl view of two window units installed in a single opening in a concrete wall in accordance with the principles of the instant invention;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view along line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view along line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view along line 6--6 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of thenew resilient stop employed in the glazing system shown in FIGS. 1 and 2; and,

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of another form of combined setting block and shirn which may be used with the glazing system.

Referring now to the drawings, FIG. I shows a panel P installed in a concrete body 10 by the glazing system which comprises the instant invention. Thus, a reglet l2 surrounds the entire opening and is preferably placed around it during the casting process. This reglet is most desirably of an extruded rigid PVC material. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, reglet 12 includes a channel portion or groove 14 and laterally extending shoulder portions 16, 18 on opposite sides of and coextensive with the channel. The channel is defined by opposite side walls 20,22 and bottom wall 24. Side walls 20, 22 have exterior projections 26 at spaced elevations therealong which serve to retain the reglet in concrete body 10. The interior surfaces of walls 20, 22 include inwardly extending projections 28 which cooperate with a new resilient stop 30 which is adapted to be received in channel 14 for a purpose which will hereinafter be described.

Shoulder 18 includes a substantially flat planar upper surface 32 which is generally perpendicular to the plane of the opening and panel P. A similar surface 34 is provided on a portion of shoulder 16, surface 34 comprising a ledge on which panel P is to be received.

Extending vertically upward from ledge 34 is flange 36 which has a substantially vertical side surface 38 which is coplanar with panel P and spaced from surface 32. Four of the above described reglets, abutting at their ends, cooperate with concrete body 10 to provide a uniform frame or support having continuous surfaces and a continuous channel around the opening. Since the dimensional tolerance of reglet 12 may be controlled during the extrusion process, it is possible to achieve a uniform dimension of the reglet in order to minimize the effect of dimensional variations occurring from the process by which concrete body 10 is formed.

Cooperating with reglet 12 to complete the glazing system is a combination of four separate elements. The first of these is sealant strip 40 positioned between panel P and coplanar surface 38. Since it is on the outside, this sealant comprises the principal weather seal. In the preferred form of the invention, the material of strip 40 is a preformed extruded sealant tape which is of a semicured, tacky nature and which is available commercially as a preformed, semi-cured, architectural grade butyl tape. The material is a semiplastic capable of flowing under pressures greater than that imposed by gravity and has a surface having pressure sensitive adhesive characteristics, such that when panel P is pressed thereagainst, the material adheres to the panel and to reglet 12.

The second element of the combination which cooperates with reglet 12 is setting block 42 which, in the form illustrated in FIG. 1, rests on the ledge 34. The setting block is preferably constructed from a neoprene material.

The third element of the glazing system combination is spacer shim 43 which is also located on ledge 34. The spacer shim is preferably of neoprene and limits the amount of compression of sealant strip 40.

Setting block 42 and shim 43 may be made integral if desired. Also, they may be continuous around the window but preferably are a plurality of short spaced segments.

The fourth element is the new resilient stop 30. Stop 30 is formed of an elastomeric material such as extruded and cured neoprene and is comprised of (FIG. 7), a body portion 44 and a depending stem portion 46 connected by a neck portion 45to the body portion. Projecting from either side of stem portion 46, are longitudinally extending ribs 48. These ribs extend outwardly and upwardly away from the lower end of stem portion 46 and coact with ribs 26 to permit easy insertion of the stem portion into channel 14, but difficult removal. Body portion 44 further includes an outer wing portion 49 having an abutment surface 50 which slopes downward and away relative to the longitudinal axis XX (FIG. 7) of stop 30 and terminates in a sealing lip 51. The body portion further includes a surface 52 which upwardly diverges from the plane of stem portion 46 to form a sealing lip 53 at its upper edge.

The length of stem 46 is such that when the lower end of stem 46 is in firm engagement with the bottom of groove or channel 14, lips 51 and 53 are in engagement with surface 32 and panel P and are deformed elastically a substantial amount so as to form a pressure seal. Lips 51 and 53 are so dimensioned that they contact their cooperating surfaces before stem 46 bottoms in the channel. Thus as stem 46 moves into channel 14, lip 51 contacts surface 32 and begins to deform elastically into a contact surface and at the same time, the deforming force turns body portion 44 counterclockwise as seen in FIG. 1 about a longitudinal axis in position 45. As body portion 44 turns, lip 53 is biased toward panel P so as to be in firm uniform pressure engagement therewith along its entire length. As stop 30 is pushed yet further into the channel, the contact areas leftward of lip 51 and below lip 53 increase until stem 46 bottoms and effectively resists further downward movement of stop 30. Reglet 12 is sufficiently straight throughout its length that, with stop 30 firmly bottomed in the channel throughout that length, the line of intersection of lip 53 with panel P will be substantially straight. When panel P is glass, or is a color which contrasts sharply with the black of stop 30, it is desirable that the line of intersection be straight, because it is the sight line, or line which catches the observers eye as he looks at the panel. I

Ribs 48 project toward the opening of the channel and thus exert a continuing pressure or bias on stop 30 directing it towards the bottom of the channel thereby helping to maintain the sealing pressures discussed above. The ribs are further aided in the action by the cooperation of projections'28 in the sidewalls of the channel.

The foregoing combination of elements cooperates to mount and seal a panel in a concrete body 10, including reglet 12, in the following manner. The preformed sealant tape, 40 is applied to vertical wall 38 of the reglet. Shim 43 and setting block 42 are placed on ledge 34. Panel P is then positioned on setting block 42 with shim 43 between the panel and surface 38. Thereafter, the panel is pressed against sealant tape 40. Resilient stop 30 is then inserted into channel 14 and forced down into the channel such that the lip 53 engages the surface of the panel, exerts a resilient pressure against the side of panel P and compresses the panel against sealant 40. Shim 43 serves to limit movement of panel P against the sealant to thereby avoid any excessive compression force which would tend to squeeze the sealant completely out of the groove. With stop 30 in the position illustrated in FIG. 1, abutment surface 50 is in firm engagement with flat planar surface 32 on reglet l2, and because of the opposing turning bias of lips 51, 53, both lips have deformed into contact areas. Moreover, because of the resilient nature of stop 30, there is a continuing pressure exerted against panel P to maintain it in sealing engagement with sealant 40, and the surface contact of stop 30 below lip 53 and the face of panel P serves as a seal for the inside portion of the panel. It will be readily apparent that it is a relatively simple matter to remove stop 30 for replacement of the panel. However, the tacky characteristics of sealant 40 are such that the sealant will be destroyed by removal of the panel. It then becomes expedient to remove the remaining sealant from surface 38, shim 43, and wherever else it may be and replace it. The glazier then resets panel P and reinserts stop 30 in the reglet to re-establish the necessary sealing pressure on the panel. Ribs 48 and projections 28 exert a substantial desireable holding force on stop 30 which may be overcome to remove the stop and which offer only neglible resistance to reassembly of the parts.

The same basic glazing system may be employed with materials other than cast concrete. For example, there is illustrated in FIG. 2 a cut limestone body 60 in which the reglet has been eliminated but wherein its function has been retained by cutting into the limestone a channel 61, a support ledge 62 and a vertical surface 63. Resilient stop30', setting block 42 and sealant 40 may be the same as that described in connection with the embodiment shown in FIG. 1. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2, stop 30' also has a stem 46"long enough so as to bottom in channel 61. The several elements cooperateto mount and seal the panel to the limestone body in substantially the same way as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 illustrates use of the gasketing system in the installation of a pair of glass window panels in an opening in a concrete wall. Window panels 74,75 may be of a conventional insulating construction, each comprising a pair of glass panels 65, 66 (FIGS. 4, 5 and 6) sepa rated by a spacer 67 at the top and bottom thereof. A protective metal band 68 is received over the top and bottom edges of panels 65, 66.

As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, a reglet 12' is cast into the concrete as the concrete wall is formed so that the reglet defines the frame in which the glass panels are received. Reglet 12' includes 34', 38 disposed as surfaces 34, 38 of reglet 12 and as hereinbefore discussed relative to FIG. 1. In addition to the reglet, a center mullion member 70, which may be an aluminum extrusion, extends across the opening and is secured to the side walls thereof. Mullion member 70 is best illustrated in FIG. 4 and, as is apparent from its cross sectional configuration, provides an upper and lower framing configuration which is substantially the same as that provided by reglet 12'. Thus, the upper surface of member 70 includes a channel or groove 71, a support ledge 72 and a vertical surface 73. The lower surface of member 70 is a mirror image of the upper surface.

When lower glass panel'74 is installed as best shown in FIGS. 4 and 6, a setting block 76 is positioned on ledge 34' of reglet 12'. The setting block 76 differs from setting block 42 of the embodiment of FIG. 1 in that it is L-shaped in a cross sectional configuration and includes a support leg 77 and a vertically extending leg 78 which functions as a spacer shim. Similarly, a setting block 76 is also received along ledge 72 of mullion member 70. As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the sealant 40' is applied to the surface38' of the reglet. As will be appreciated, the sealant extends around the entire periphery of the opening in which panel 74 is to be received, including the vertical surface 73 on the mullion member 70. As before, sealant 40 may be in tape form.

Glass panel 74 is positioned on setting blocks 76 and pressed against sealant 40'. Leg 78 of the setting block serves as a stop member to prevent the squeezing out of the sealant in the same manner as shim 43 of the FIG. 1 embodiment. With the window panel in position in the opening, resilient stops 30" are inserted in reglet channel 14' and channel 71 to resiliently urge the panel into sealing engagement with sealant 40'.

The upper window panel is installed in the upper opening in precisely the same manner as the lower window panel 74 and a further description of that installation is believed to be unnecessary. It will beappreciated that additional windows may be installed in like resent areas or reduced thickness which are sufficiently strong to remain connected during normal handling of the setting block but which, if desired, may be broken off in order that leg 77" may be shortened so as to accommodate different thicknesses of panels or window panes.

Several advantages of the disclosed glazing system should be noted. As pointed out above, this system makes it possible to install panels with facility even though the system is used with a rough cast material in which dimensional control may be less than accurately maintained. The stop when bottomed in the groove has its outer surface or sight line automatically held straight without any skill required by the installer. Moreover, the same basic system is readily adaptable to openings of various sizes, it being necessary only to vary the length of each element in the system to accommodate for different sizes. Further, the system is one thatcan be readily installed and can be readily disassembled for replacement of a panel. Still further, the system achieves a substantially uniform sealing pressure around the entire periphery of the panel and there is nothing in the system to shrink, dry out, rust or otherwise deteriorate. The system may be employed with a wide diversity of materials to thereby make it possible to use the same basic system on a wide diversity of structures. Finally, and most importantly, the new resilient stop is more effective than the stop members employed in previous systems. As a result, the same basic system may be employed on a wide diversity of shapes and sizes of windows, it being necessary merely to bend the stop to conform to the specific shape rather than forming a special stop for each window.

The invention has been described with reference to preferred embodiments. Obviously, modifications and alterations will occur to others upon the reading and understanding of this specification. It is my intention to include all such modifications and alterations insofar as they come within the scope of the appended claims or the equivalence thereof.

Having thus described my invention, I now claim:

1. A glazing system for an opening comprising in combination:

a. a first generally narrow surface coplanar with and surrounding said opening;

b. a second surface surrounding said opening and perpendicular to said opening adjacent to said first surface;

c. a channel in said second surface and co-extensive therewith spaced from said first surfaceand open towards said opening;

d. sealing means adapted to be positioned between a panel for closing said opening and said first surface; and,

e. an elongated elastomeric stop member including first and second portions, said first portion being adapted to extend longitudinally into said channel, said second portion-including a first sealing surface extending upwardly and inwardly with respect to said first portion toward said panel and terminating in a first outermost leading edge, said second portion further including a second sealing surface extending outwardly and downwardly with respect to said first portion toward the side of said channel remote from said panel, (1) an outer portion only of said first sealing surface being adapted to sealingly engage said panel on the panel surface opposite said sealing means, (2) an outer portion only of said second sealing surface being adapted to sealingly engage said second surface on the side of said channel remote from said first surface, (3) said second portion of said stop member being displaceable relative tov said first portion thereof about a longitudinally extending axis disposed in said stop member vertically below said outer portion of said firstsealing surface, whereby upon insertion of said first portion of said stop member into said channel, said outer portion only of said second sealing surface engages said second surface to displace said second portion of said stop member about said axis for said outer portion only of said first sealing surface to engage said panel surface, (4) and the remaining portions of said first and second sealing surfaces being spaced respectively from said panel surface and second surface upon insertion of said first portion of said stop member into said channel.

2. The glazing system as defined in claim 1 wherein said first portion of said stop member includes a plurality of first projections extending laterally therealong and said channel forming means includes a plurality of second projections extending laterally therealong, said first and second projections cooperating with each other to retain said first portion in said channel.

3. The glazing system as defined in claim 2 wherein said first portion of said stop member bottoms in said channel when said first portion is inserted therein.

4. The glazing system as defined in claim 1 further including means for shimming the position of said panel relative to said first surface, said shimming means being positioned between said panel and said first surface whereby the degree of compression exerted by said panel against said sealing means is controlled.

5. The glazing system as defined in claim 4 further including means for properly locating said panel relative to said second surface.

6. The glazing system as defined in claim 5 wherein said shimming means and said locating means are inte- I gral and comprise an L shaped member, said shimming means comprising one leg of said member and said locating means comprising the other leg of said member, said other leg including means therein for shortening the length of said other leg.

7. The glazing system as defined in claim 1 wherein said sealing means comprises a preformed extruded tape of semi-plastic tacky material.

8. The glazing system as defined in claim 1 wherein said first and second surfaces and said channel are formed by a unitary rigid extruded plastic reglet.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3958383 *Mar 19, 1975May 25, 1976The Standard Products CompanyGlazing system
US4055921 *Oct 30, 1975Nov 1, 1977Carteret Arnold Edward FrancisReglets and associated components
US4092812 *Aug 5, 1976Jun 6, 1978General Electric CompanySilicone glazing system
US4165589 *Apr 5, 1977Aug 28, 1979Carteret Arnold E F DeReglets and associated components
US4633640 *Mar 25, 1986Jan 6, 1987Hutter Gerhard PWall anchor or support
US4879851 *Feb 18, 1988Nov 14, 1989Joseph BocciaHollow kick molding
US6718705 *Dec 16, 2002Apr 13, 2004Arpal Aluminum Ltd.Resistant window systems
US6869128 *Oct 10, 2003Mar 22, 2005Transit Care, Inc.Quick change window assembly
US7152906Mar 22, 2005Dec 26, 2006Transit Care, Inc.Quick change window assembly
US7254927Mar 25, 2005Aug 14, 2007Transit Care, Inc.Process for retrofitting an existing bus window having rubber seals with metal members that define a retention space for a sacrificial member
US7591117Jan 12, 2006Sep 22, 2009Richard Fritz Gmbh & Co. KgWindow unit
US8011145May 29, 2007Sep 6, 2011Pacc Systems I.P., LlcSegmented joint for masonry construction
US20040145214 *Oct 10, 2003Jul 29, 2004Jerry FarrarQuick change window assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/204.597, 52/62
International ClassificationE06B3/62, E06B3/58, E06B3/54, E06B3/68, E06B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/6205, E06B2003/6223, E06B3/68, E06B3/5409
European ClassificationE06B3/68, E06B3/62B, E06B3/54A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 16, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: GRIFFITH RUBBER MILLS, AN OREGON CORP., OREGON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:STANDARD PRODUCTS CO., THE;REEL/FRAME:005237/0853
Effective date: 19891205