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Publication numberUS3847175 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateFeb 16, 1973
Priority dateFeb 16, 1973
Publication numberUS 3847175 A, US 3847175A, US-A-3847175, US3847175 A, US3847175A
InventorsAnderson K
Original AssigneeCarrcraft Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Universal installation box for use in dryer vent systems and in water supply and drain systems
US 3847175 A
Abstract
A universal installation box and dryer vent system, including also a water supply-drain system, wherein the box is molded with a plurality of knock-outs to accommodate the various fixtures and plumbing needed for the respective systems. The dryer vent system includes an outer tube extending from the rear wall of the installation box and around which the masonry materials are constructed, thus creating an opening for the primary vent which is also connected to the box, the primary vent being installed in the opening created by the outer tube. In the dryer vent system a secondary lint screen may be provided for the front cover plate and serves to trap lint before it can reach the primary vent housing and butterfly valve normally provided therewith. The box, when used in the water supply-drain system, is provided with a knock-out to receive a test seal washer which may be left intact to prevent sewer gas or other odors from escaping until the appliance is put in use and the drain hose connected to the box. Ample knock-outs let the water lines be brought in from any direction best suited to the job. In either system the universal box mounts flush to the various wall finishes. Electric outlets may be provided with the dryer box and separate covers are provided depending on whether the box is used in the dryer system or the water supply-drain system.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Anderson Nov. 12, 1974 [75] Inventor: Kenneth J. Anderson, Hebron, Ky.

[73] Assignee: Carrcratt Manufacturing Company,

Cincinnati, Ohio [22] Filed: Feb. 16, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 333,023

[52] US. Cl. 137/360 [51] Int. Cl F161 5/02 [58] Field of Search 220/3.23.9, 220/242, 24.3; 285/3, 4, 340; 137/360; 138/89, 92

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,351,724 8/1920 Misener .;.....'l38/89 X 1,933,117 10/1933 Markle 285/3 2,352,913 7/1944 Parker..... 220/32 UX 2,596,182 5/1952 Sosaya 285/3 UX 2,611,904 9/1952 Gross 4/293 2,760,728 8/1956 Jordan 4/295 X 3,048,911 8/1962 Almon 138/89 X 3,096,782 7/1963 Williams 137/360 3,312,483 4/1967 Leadbetter et al. 285/340 3,468,334 9/1969 Hamrick 137/360 X Primary Examiner-Henry T. Klinksiek Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Melville, Strasser,.Foster & Hoffman [5 7 1 ABSTRACT A universal installation box and dryer vent system, including also a water supply-drain system, wherein the box is molded with a plurality of knock-outs to accommodate the various fixtures and plumbing needed for the respective systems. The dryer vent system includes an outer tube extending from the rear wall of the installation box and around which the masonry materials are constructed, thus creating an opening for the primary vent which is also connected to the box. the primary vent being installed in the opening created by the outer tube. In the dryer vent system a secondary lint screen may be provided for the front cover plate and serves to trap lint before it can reach the primary vent housing and butterfly valve normally provided therewith. The box, when used in the water supplydrain system, is provided with a knock-out to receive a test seal washer which may be left intact to prevent sewer gas or other odors from escaping until the appliance is put in use and the drain hose connected to the box. Ample knock-outs let the water lines be brought in from any direction best suited to the job. In either system the universal box mounts flush to the various wall finishes. Electric outlets may be provided with the dryer box and separate covers are provided depending on whether the box is used in the dryer system or the water supply'drain system.

10 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures UNIVERSAL INSTALLATION BOX FOR USE IN DRYER VENT SYSTEMS AND IN WATER SUPPLY AND DRAIN SYSTEMS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION ers may be positioned for best use of floor space in the kitchen or recreation room arrangements. The universal box, dryer vent system and water supply-drairis ystem may be used in homes, apartments, townhouses, and commercial establishments.

2. Description of the Prior Art Although a search of the prior patent art hasnot been conducted, it is known that patents do exist in this area as represented by Dick et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,952,27l, Dick et al. U.S. Pat. No. 191,737 and Williams U.S. Pat. No. 3,096,782. Applicant has for a number of years manufactured and sold a similar box for use in water supplydrain systems, a box, however, which was not designed for use in dryer vent systems and a box which lacked some of the features now developed and incorporated in the box and systems of the instant invention. Applicant is not aware of any prior art which utilizes a universal box including the various knockouts arranged as described, the test seal washer, the secondary tube and primary vent, and the supplemental lint screen. Prior art devices such as shown in Dick et al. U.S. Pat. No. 2,952,271 locate the electrical outlets in juxtaposition to the water supply, as distinguished from applicants arrangement wherein the electric is preferably separated from the water supply and usually included only with the unit when incorporated in the dryer vent system. It is known that assemblies like that shown in Dick et al U.S. Pat. No. 2,952,271 have been manufactured and sold for a number of years.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention includes a universal box which is provided with a number of knock-outs to enable it to accommodate itself for use either in a dryer vent system or a water supply-drain system. This box, when employed in the dryer vent system of this invention, is provided with a pair of large knock-outs, back and top, by which the vent exhaust may take place through either an outside or inside wall, or an interior wall. In such a dryer vent system the electric outlets, such as a pair of 120 volt outlets and a 240 volt outlet, may be secured to the sides of the box and a cover plate fastened thereto to accommodate the vent connection and the electric outlets. This plate may incorporate a secondary lint screen and cleanable lint trap to prevent lint buildup from interfering with the working of the outside vent housing and butterfly valve ordinarily provided therefor.

When the box is incorporated in a water supply-drain system, the electric outlets are usually omitted and a plain cover is provided having a large central, rectangular opening providing easy access to the water faucets and drain. The knock-outs are so located that the water faucets may be positioned at the bottom, sides or at the top of the units. A further knock-out is provided for the test seal washer which is a part of the invention.

In all uses of the box it is arranged to be placed between new size wall studs and may be readily adjusted for panel, drywall or plaster construction.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the basic universal box with the electrical outlets and water connections shown in phantom, noting that both electric and water will not ordinarily be incorporated simultaneously in the same box.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the cover utilized for the box when it is incorporated in the dryer vent system which will also include the electric outlets.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the cover of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a front view of thecover utilized for the box when it is incorporated in the water supply-drain system, which system does not ordinarily incorporate the elctric with this box.

FIG. 5 is a top view of the receptacle positioned between wall studs.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the receptacle positioned in a wall.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged cross section taken on the line 77 of FIG. 5 and showing also the vent inserts and drain inserts, it being noted that both would ordinarily not be employed simultaneously in the same box.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged cross section taken on the line 8-8 of FIG. 2 showing the secondary lint screen and cleanable lint trap in position.

FIG. 9 is a top view of the new test seal washer employed in the drain of the box when used in the water supplydrain drain system.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a modified boxand associated parts designed primarily for use in a dryer vent system.

FIG. 11 is a front elevation of the universal box or this invention when employed simultaneously in a dryer vent system and in a water supply-drain system.

And FIG. 12 is a front elevation showing the use of two of the universal boxes of this invention as arranged in the preferred manner for providing a dryer vent system and a separate water supply-drain system.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As noted in the description of the drawings, the box, in some instances, has been illustrated in connection with certain elements from both the dryer vent system and the water supply-drain system; this has been done for purposes of illustration only and it will be understood that a particular box, designed for a particular system, will not ordinarily include the elements from the other system.

For the sake of clarity, therefore, the invention will first be described in connection with the dryer vent system, and then in connection with the water supplydrain system, common reference numerals being applied to those elements of the box which remain the same regardless of in which system the box is em- I ployed.

The basic box is perhaps best seen in FIGS. 1, 5 and 6 and is indicated at 20 therein. The box 20 includes a pair of spaced horizontal flanges 21 to which an appropriate cover may be secured as indicated at 22. The box 20 includes top and bottom walls 23 and 24 and side walls 25, and a rear wall 26, the front being generally open. Bracket flanges 27 extend from the side walls 25 to which they are fastened by gussets 28.

Preferably the basic universal box is made of an injection-molded, high tensile strength, non-metallic material. The attached stud brackets 27 are designed for use with new size studs and may be adjusted for panel, drywall or plaster construction. In placing the box between wall studs 29, strips 30, for'example, of 1 inch stock or 4 inch plywood, (2% X 4 inches), 40% inches above finished floor level, are fastened to the inside of the studs 29 between which the box 20 is to be placed. These strips or blocks 30 are placed back from the face of the studs 29 to accommodate the finished wall to be employed. Suitable fasteners 31 engage the anchor brackets 27 to the blocks 30 and it will be observed that such blocks are so located that the finished wall 32 is flush with the front flanges 21 of the box.

Those parts and fixtures identified by two digit reference numerals are common to the box and related means regardless of whether it is employed in the dryer vent system or in the water supply-drain system. Those parts and fixtures identified by reference numerals of the 100 series identify structures ordinarily limited to the dryer vent system while the 200 reference numeral series identify matter usually peculiar to the water supply-drain system, 100 series items and 200 series items will not normally be included with any single box 20. An exception is shown in FIG. 11 and will be discussed later.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 5 the box 20 is provided with a pair of large knock-outs 101 and 102, the former being located in the back wall 26 of the box 20 and the latter being located in the top wall 23 of the box 20. The back knock-out 101 is provided for vent exhaust through either an outside or inside wall while the top knock-out 102 is available for interior wall venting.

With the box 20 located between the wall studs 29 in the manner shown in FIG. 5, and assuming vent exhaust through the building wall to the outside, the knock-out 101 is removed and, as shown in FIG. 7, a secondaryprimary vent tube retainer ring 103 is placed within the opening 101a created when the knock-out 101 was removed. The secondary tube 104 is then placed around the outside of the flange 1030 of the retainer ring 103 as indicated. This secondary tube 104 will be of sufficient length to extend clear through the outside wall so that brickwork and masonry may be roughed in around it. This creates an opening through which the primary vent tube extends, this primary tube 105 engaging the inner side of the retainer flange 1030. The primary vent tube 105 is normally installed after the masonry work has been completed, at which time one will cut off the excess secondary tube on the outside wall and insert the primary vent tube 105 into the inside of the: retainer ring flange 103a.

By this arrangement a prefabricated dryer vent is provided which will insure quality appearance for all homes. As noted, masonry and/or finished wall materials are constructed around the secondary tube 104, thus creating an opening for the primary vent tube 105. This saves hours of labor and the danger of possibly knocking a hole in a finished wall and striking pipes, electric wires, duct work and the like. When the construction of the walls is completed, the primary vent tube 105 is cut to desired length and installed in the opening created by the secondary tube 104, the excess of this secondary tube 104 being cut off so as to provide a smooth, finished, attractive surface exterior. A modification of this arrangement is shown in FIG. 10 and will be discussed later.

In the dryer vent system it will usually be desirable to provide the box 20 with a 240 volt outlet 106 and a pair of 120 volt outlets 107, see FIG. 1. These are the outlets commonly employed for electric dryers. For gas dryers it may be that only the two 120 volt outlets will be required. The cover 108 for the dryer vent system box 20 is shown in FIG. 2 and is provided with suitable openings 106a and 107a to expose the respective electrical outlets. This cover will be secured to the flanges 21. In the case of a gas dryer wherein the 240 volt outlet may be omitted, the opening 1060 may be used for the gas line.

Also associated wiht the cover 108 is the secondary lint screen and cleanable lint trap earlier mentioned. This is best seen in FIGS. 2 and 8 wherein a plate 109 is secured to the cover 108 so as to provide a pocket to receive a screen 110 therebetween; the plate 109 has a rim 11 extending therefrom and about which the exhaust conduit 112 from the dryer is engaged. This secondary lint screen 110 considerably cuts down the amount of lint that would otherwise enter the box 20 and exit through the primary vent tube 105. It isslidable in the members 108 and 109 and may be removed for cleaning; the knob 110a aids this.

The vent tube will normally be supplied with a butterfly valve at the exterior of the building. It has been found, however, that in practice this valve (not shown) becomes jammed in its open position by the accumulation of lint whereby rodents and insects are provided an entry to the building. By eliminating the lint from the tube 105 by use of the screen 110, which screen may easily be removed and cleaned after each use of the dryer, proper action of the butterfly valve is insured. A modification of this arrangement, however, is shown in FIG. 10 and will be described later.

Application of the basic, universal box 20 to the water supply-drain system will now be described. The bottom 24 of the box 20 may be provided with a slight depressed portion 24a. Located centrally of this area is a pair of concentric knock-outs generally indicated at 201; these knock-outs, for example, may be such as to provide either a 2 inch diameter opening or one of 1% inches. In FIG. 1 both knock-outs 201 have been removed to thus create the opening 201a. This opening 201a, of course, is to accommodate the drain pipe and related means which will be described shortly. (It will be understood that the knock-outs remain in place when the box 20 is used in the dryer vent system.)

The bottom 24 is also provided with knock-outs generally indicated at 202 to accommodate the water valve means generally indicated at 203. Additional pairs of knock-outs 204 are provided in each of the side walls 25 and three similar knock-outs 205 are provided in the top wall 23, see FIG. 5. It will be observed, therefore, that great versatility is inherent in the box 20 as so arranged in that the water valve means 203 may be located in the bottom 24, or in the sides 25, or in the top 23, or in selected combinations thereof, depending on which of the knock-outs 202, 204 and 205 are utilized.

The nine knock-0uts 202, 204 and 205 provided in the bottom, sides and top of the box 20, make possible any desired supply valve location. As indicated, the knock-outs 201 will accommodate 1% inch or 2 inch drain pipe. As before, the box may be located flush with the wall 32 simply by properly locating the members on the wall studs 29. The knock-out holes for the valve locations provide a choice of access for hot and cold water lines in a variety of combinations. This makes the unit easy to adapt to any on-the-job plumbing problem.

It will be apparent, therefore, that, by way of example, the box 20 may be used to accommodate a dishwasher station and it can also have a muti-purpose use. It can share the same drain with an automatic clothes washer, an arrangement achieved by putting three valves in the box. The electric outlets 106 and 107 are usually not provided on the box 20 when it is used in the water supply-drain system. By locating two of these boxes side by side, however, one arranged for the dryer vent system and one arranged for the water supplydrain system, a safe and dry electrical outlet for both a dishwasher and a clothes washer is readily obtained. This arrangement removes the electrical outlets from the proximity of the water valves to prevent short cicuit fire hazards which may arise from wet conditions. Such preferred arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 11, a pair of studs 29 separating the two boxes 20.

An important facet of this invention is the test seal washer which is placed in the opening 201a when the selected knock-out 201 is removed. This arrangement is perhaps best seen in FIGS. 7 and 9. The test seal washer is indicated at 206 in FIG. 9. This washer is illustrated as a solid blank of plastic or like material provided with an annular groove 207 having radial grooves 208 extending therefrom. These grooves are cut (or stamped or embossed) approximately two-thirds the way through the blank 206. The plumber will apply the test washer as he installs the box 20 in the water supplydrain system. The drain pipe 209 will extend through the opening 201a into the interior of the box 20. A gasket 210 is provided adjacent the bottom side of the bottom 24 and a nut 211 aids in holding the arrangement in place. The test seal washer 206 is placed on top of the drain pipe 209 and held in place by the retainer nut 212.

Prior to the housewife, or someone in her behalf, hooks up the automatic clothes washer hose, for example, the blank 206 is kept completely intact. In this manner it acts as a barrier against sewer and other gases. It provides the plumber a test seal. Thus, smoke or gas may be put in at the sewer in order for the plumber to determine if the system from house to sewer is tight. The member 206 remains intact until the housewife decides to put in a washer and, during any period of nonuse, the seal member 206 prevents sewer gas from coming into the house.

When it is decided to connect up the automatic washer hose generally indicated at 213, the center portion 206a of the member 206 is removed and the radial grooves 208 are cut all the way through; all of this may be accomplish very simply with any relatively sharp instrument. The drain hose 213 is pushed through the center opening created by removal of the seal portion 206a and the sections 208a formed by the completed cuts 208 will act as grippers to hold the drain hose in place as illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 7. These grippers 208a prevent the washer drain hose from being accidentally dislodged. As indicated, the test seal washer 206, which may be press fitted within the retainer nut or terminal nut cap 212, remains intact until the hose 213 is put in place.

A cover 214 having a large central opening 215 may be provided for the box 20 when used in the water supply-drain system. This serves to finish off the universal box 20 while at the same time permitting easy access to the interior thereof and the plumbing located therein.

In considering the universal box 20 and its application either to the dryer vent system or to the water supply-drain system, it should be kept in mind that the box, when used in the dryer vent system, is represented by the combination of elements assigned two digit reference numerals and those of the series; when used in the water supply-drain system, the box is represented by' the combination of elements assigned two digit reference numerals and those of the 200 series. The structures and arrangements represented by the 100 series and 200 series reference numerals are normally not simultaneously utilized with the same box 20.

Thus, for example, when the box 20 is incorporated in a dryer vent system, all of the knock-outs 201, 202, 204 and 205 remain in place while a selected one of the knock-outs 101 and 102 is removed. Similarly, by way of further example, when the box 20 is used in a water supply-drain system, selected ones of the knock-outs 201, 202, 204 and 205 are utilized for the drain and the water valves while both of the knock-outs 101 and 102 remain in place. Also, when the box 20 is employed in a water supply-drain system, the electric outlets 106 and 107 are usually not attached to the box as they would be when the box is adapted for use in the dryer vent system. The cover 108, therefore, is designed especially for the box when used in the dryer vent system incorporating the electric outlets 1'06 and 107 while the cover 214 is especially provided for the box 20 when used in the water supply-drain system.

The preferred arrangement just described is illustrated in FIG. 12 wherein two universal boxes 20, one set up for the dryer vent system and the other set up for the water supply-drain system, are utilized. This provides optimum safety. Use of two boxes requires very little over what may be saved by combining the dryer vent and water supply-drain systems illustrated In FIG. 11, namely, one box and one cover, the remaining hardware and fixtures being required anyway.

FIGS. 10 and 11 illustrate other modifications. As shown in FIG. 10, for example, the member 103 of FIG. 7 has been replaced by an adapter 123. This adapter 123 (two are shown in FIG. 10, back to back, a feature which will be amplified shortly) has a flange 124, a first cylindrical extension 125, and a second, smaller cylindrical extension 126. The secondary (temporary) tube 104 will engage over the extension 125 and the primary tube 105 will engage over the extension 126, thus achieving a result equivalent to that described in connection with FIG. 7 at 103a and 104-105. That side of the flange 124 from which the extension extends is shown in FIG. 10 as abutting the interior face of the rear wall 26 of the box 20, the extension 125 being press fitted within the rear opening 101a or the flange 124 being glued to the wall 26, or both; the exact manner of holding the member 123 in place is not critical.

The box-like containers for housing the electrical components 106 and 107 are illustrated at 106b and 107b respectively.

FIG. 10 illustrates yet another modification of the invention. In this modification the cover 108 and secondary lint screen 110 have been omitted. In this arrangement the exhaust conduit 112 from the dryer is introduced directly towards the rear wall 26 through the now open front of the box 20. Such conduit is suitably connected in line with the primary tube 105. A novel way of doing this is to fix a second adapter 123 to that first mentioned and then engage the conduit 112 over one or the other of the similar extensions 125a or 126a, preferably 126a so that the relative sizes of the tube 105 and conduit 112 are comparable. The flanges 124 and 124a may be glued to one another or suitably joined in some other manner. An appropriate cover (not shown) may be provided for the box of this arrangement, if desired, with an opening through which the conduit 112 may pass. Although the lint screen 110 of FIG. 8 may sometimes be desirable, it is a possible source of trouble if not cleaned regularly in that it may thereby lead to overheating of the dryer motor; also, many of the modern dryers do an adequate job of lint removal to the extent that a screen 110 is not always necessary.

In FIG. 11 a single box 20 has been shown as arranged to simultaneously serve both the dryer vent and water supply-drain systems, an arrangement which is made possible by this invention, although not always desirable. The knockout 101 in the rear wall 26 may be utilized in the manner described in connection with FIG. 10 (or even that of FIGS. 7 and 8) or, as is the case with the box 20 of FIG. 5, the knockout 102 in the top 123 may be utilized. In this latter event an arrangement similar to that illustrated at 123 in FIG. 10 may be employed. Thus a pair of members 133, each comprising a flange 134 having an extension 135 extending therefrom, may be employed. Because of space limitations the cross section of the extension 135 may be other than circular but such as to accommodate the dryer exhausts brought thereto by the conduit 112. As shown, that face of the flange 134 from which the extension 135 extends, through the opening created by removing the knockout 102, is suitably engaged to the interior face of the top wall 23. The flange 134a of the other member 133 may be suitably fastened to the first flange 134. It will be apparent, therefore that a suitably shaped conduit 112 may engage the extension 135a and a suitable exhaust conduit (specifically not shown but comparable to those shown at 105 in FIGS. 7 and 10) may engage the extension 135 and be directed through the building interior to a suitable outlet.

It is believed that the foregoing constitutes a full and complete description of all facets of this invention. Although the invention has been described with reference to particular structures and arrangements, it is to be understood that this has been for purposes of illustration only and that the invention is not to be limited to these particular structures and arrangements except insofar as they are specifically set forth insubjoined claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and what is desired to be protected by letters patent 1s:

1. A universal box for use selectively with dry-vent and water supply-drain systems; said box having top and bottom walls joined by a pair of side walls and a rear wall, and a substantially open front; said box including a plurality of knock-outs located in the side, bottom, top and rear walls; a certain, at least, of said knock-outs being removable for the reception in said box of a vent means; and others of said knock-outs being removable for the reception in said box of water supply valve means and drain means; whereby when said box is selected for use in a dryer-vent system only said certain knock-out is removed and whereby when said box is selected for use in a water supply-drain system only said others of said knock-outs are removed; and drain means located in the said bottom wall when the said knock-out for said bottom wall is removed; and including supply valve means located in at least a selected wall when the said knock-out for the said selected wall is removed; said drain means being adapted to receive a hose discharging waste and including a test seal washer, said washer having a top surface and a bottom surface and comprising a blank of relatively stiff material to cover the discharge end of said hose, said blank having a groove in the said top surface and initially extending only part way therethrough and configured to the outer periphery of the discharge end and slightly smaller than said outer periphery, and a plurality of other grooves in the said top surface and extending radially from said first mentioned groove towards but short of the outer periphery of said blank and initially extending only part way through said blank; whereby when all of said grooves are extended clear through said blank, said blank is provided with a central circular opening surrounded by a plurality of gripping segments and said hose may extend through said blank and be gripped by said gripping segments.

2. A universal box for use selectively with dryer-vent and water supply-drain systems; said box having top and bottom walls joined by a pair of side walls and a rear wall, and a substantially open front; said box including a plurality of knock-outs located in the side, bottom, top and rear walls; a certain, at least, of said knock-outs being removable for the reception in said box of a vent means; and others of said knock-outs being removable for the reception in said box of water supply valve means and drain means; whereby when said box is selected for use in a dryer-vent system only said certain knock-out is removed and whereby'when said box is selected for use in a water supply-drain system only said others of said knock-outs are removed; and a cover for the said substantially open front, said cover having means to receive the exhaust of a dryer and the like; and debris catching means in said cover means; whereby debris in said exhaust is removed therefrom as said exhaust enters said box and before it exits from said box through said vent means.

3. The box of claim 2 including at least one electric outlet located on at least one of said walls when said box is selected for use in a dryer-vent system.

4. The box of claim 2 which said vent means is located in said rear wall when the said knock-out for said rear wall is removed, said vent means having a flange extending through said rear wall and adapted to receive a secondary conduit on the outside therof and a primary conduit on the inside therof, said primary conduit to extend through said secondary conduit.

5. The box of 2 in which said exhaust vent means includes an extension to which a conduit may be connected for leaving exhaust from said box.

6. The box of claim 5 in which said exhaust vent means includes a second extension greater in cross section than said first mentioned extention to which a spacer may be connected and through which said conduit may pass.

7. The box of claim 2 including at least one electric outlet located on at least one of said walls when said box is selected for use in a dry-vent system; and wherein said cover is provided with receptacle means to align with and extend over said electric outlet whereby to prevent access to said outlet through said cover.

8. The box of claim 7 including a pair of said electric outlets, one mounted on each of said side walls, and said cover extending over both outlets and having a said receptacle means for each.

9. A universal box for use selectively with dry-vent and water supply-drain systems; said box having top and bottom walls joined by a pair of side walls and a rear wall, and a substantially open front; said box including a plurality of knock-outs located in the side, bottom, top and rear walls; a certain, at least, of said knock-outs being removable for the reception in said box of a vent means; and others of said knock-outs being removable for the reception in said box of water supply valve means and drain means; whereby when said box is selected for use in a dryer-vent system only said certain knock-out is removed and whereby when said box is selected for use in a water supply-drain system only said others of said knock-outs are removed; and including at least one electric outlet located on at least one of said walls when said box is selected for use in a dryer-vent system; said vent means being located in said rear wall, and said vent means having a flange extending through said rear wall and adapted to receive a secondary conduit on the outside thereof and a primary conduit on the inside thereof, said secondary conduit to estend through said primary conduit; a cover for the said substantially open front, said cover having receptacle means to align with and extend over said electric outlet whereby to permit access to said outlet through said cover; connector means on said cover means to receive the exhaust from a dryer and the link; and debris catching means in said cover means to receive the exhaust passing through said connector means; whereby debris in said exhaust is removed therefrom as said exhaust enters said box and before it exits from said box through said vent means.

10. The box of claim 9 including a pair of said elecsaid receptacle means for each.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification137/360
International ClassificationE03C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/00
European ClassificationE03C1/00