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Publication numberUS3847396 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateJul 26, 1973
Priority dateJul 29, 1972
Publication numberUS 3847396 A, US 3847396A, US-A-3847396, US3847396 A, US3847396A
InventorsAshford D
Original AssigneeSolartron Electronic Group
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Umpires ray gun for use in weapon training systems
US 3847396 A
Abstract
A hand held ray gun for use in weapon training systems transmits a beam modulated in a first mode to allow an umpire directing the beam on a responsive target to check that the radio responder on the target is responding to the beam and operates in a second mode of modulation, selected by means of a manually operated switch, to allow the umpire to transmit a coded signal to 'kill' the target vehicle, for example by disabling its electrical supply system.
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United States Patent 11 91- Ashford Nov. 12, 1 9 74 1 1 UMPIRES RAY GUN FOR USE IN WEAPON TRAINING SYSTEMS [75] lnventor: David William Ashford,

- Farnborough, England [73] Assignee: The Solartron Electronic Group Limited, Farnborough, Hampshire, England I [22] Filed: July 26, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 383,026

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data July'29, 1972 Great Britain 35569/72 [52] US. Cl. 273/10Ll, 35/25 [51] Int. Cl F4lj 5/02 [58] Field of Search 273/101.1, 101.2; 35/25;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,077,383 4/1937 Foisy 273/10l.1

Strauss";

3,151,248 9/1964 Glaser 273/l0l.1 3,447,033 5 /1969 Redmond 273/l0l.l 3,452,453 7/1969 Ohlund 273/10l.1 3,588,108 4/1967 Ormiston 273/l0l.1

Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant ExaminerMarvin Siskind Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Roylance, Abrams, Berdo & Kaul 57 ABSTRACT A hand held ray gun for use in weapon training systems transmits a beam modulated in a first mode to allow an umpire directing the beam on a responsive target to check that the radio responder on the target is responding to the beam and operates in a second mode of modulation, selected by means of a manually operated switch, to allow the umpire to transmit a coded signal to kill the target vehicle, for example by disabling its electrical supply system.

6 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures FATENTEURIIV 12 :914

SHEET 2 OF 2 UMPIRES RAY GUN FOR USE IN WEAPON TRAINING SYSTEMS This invention relates to ancillary equipment for weapon trainingsystems and particularly, but not exclusively, for those in which a narrow beam of electromagnetic radiation is used to simulate the lineof fire from a gun on an attacking vehicle and in which detectors mounted on a target detect such radiation and, by means of a radio link, signal back to the attacking vehicle that they are under fire or have been hit.

One such system is described in our US. Pat. No. 3,588,108 and although this system permits more effective training of tank crews in tactical exercises by allowing one tank to disable another by accurate simulated fire rather than by relying entirely on the judgement of umpires, which is frequently late and necessarily arbitrary, it has been found that there is still a need for umpires. Umpires need to be able to check, at a distance, that a tank crews weapon training equipment is switched on and is operating in the target mode. The role of the umpire would be greatly enhanced moreover if he were able to disable any tank at will, thus,for example, simulating the effects of air strikes or mine fields.

Ray guns, such as are described in US. Pat. No. 2,070,529 are of course well known but these do not provide for operation in more than one mode nor do they provide for transmission from the target to show that equipment on the target is working without actually effecting a kill..

With this need in mind there is provided according to I nected to receive signals from said detecting means and responsive to at least one mode of modulation of said radiation corresponding to a kill signal, said apparatus comprising in combination a source for providing a collimated beam of electromagnetic radiation, modulating means co-operating with said source for modulating said beam in at least first and second modes, said first mode being adapted to activate said transmitting means to transmit without activating said selective circuit, and said second mode being adapted to activate said selective circuit on the target as a kill signal, manually operable switch means connected to said modulating means for selecting at will each of said modes of modulation and for causing the beam to be transmitted in said selected mode, aiming means con-. nected to said source and aligned with said beam for aiming said beam at said target, radio receiving means for receiving the radio signals transmitted from said tar get in response to radiation from said beam incidenton said target and indicating means connected to said receiving means for indicating that the detecting means on the target has detected the incidence of the beam.

ings, in which: FIG. .1 shows a soldier umpire using equipment according to the invention.

FIG. 2 shows diagramatically further detail of the umpires gun" which forms part of the equipment.

FIG. 3 shows a view through the sight which forms part of the umpires gun."

. FIG. 4 shows in greater detail the modulator depicted in FIG. 2.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a soldier, 1, is holding an umpire s gun, 2, which comprises a body, 3, containing a source (not shown in this figure) which in operation provides a modulated'collimated beam of electromagnetic radiation, and a sight, 5, aligned withsaid Press button switches 9 and 10 are provided on the stock 11 of the umpires gun for firing the gun in each of its modes of operation.

Referring now to FIG. 2 there is shown diagramatically and in part section the umpires gun 2 in FIG. 1. The source of the modulated collimated beam of electromagnetic radiation comprises a convex collimating lens 13 and a Gallium Arsenide laser diode l2 situated substantially on the optical axis and in the focal plane thereof.

The laser diode 12 receives electrical pulses from a modulator 14 which may be operated in a plurality of modes, for example, by changing the frequency of pulses supplied to the laser 12. The required mode of modulation is determined by press switches 9 and 10. It is convenient to arrange for the laser to be fired in a first mode when one press button is pressed and in a second mode when both press buttons are pressed but it is evident that there are many different switches or arrangements of switches which could be used for these functions.

FIG. 3 shows the view through the eye-piece 8 of sight 5 when the umpires gun 2 is correctly aimed at a target tank 16, being aligned with cross-hairs 15 of the sight 5. Indicator lamps 17 are provided in the sight 5 to give an indication to the soldier 1 without the need for him to move his eye from the eye-piece 8.

FIG. 4 shows further detail of the modulator 14 of FIG. 2. A monostable 30 which may conveniently be a type 74121 monostable multivibrator obtainable from ITT Semiconductors, Footscray, Kent, has an A terminal 32 which is connected'to ground, a B terminal 34, a Q output 36 and timing terminals 38 and 40 between which a timing capacitor 42 is connected, terminal 40 being connected through resistor 44 to a common supply line 46.

The output 36 of monostable 30 is connected to the input 48 of a schmidt trigger 50 which may conveniently by type SN7413 obtainable from the same source as the monostable 30. Schmidt trigger 50 has an output 52 which is connected to the input 54 of a sec- 0nd similar schmidt trigger 56 which has an output 58. Output 58 is connected to one input 60 of a NAND gate 62 the other input of which 64 is connected to input 34 of multivibrator 30. The output 66 of NAND V gate 62 is connected via resistor 68 to input 48 of trigger 50 the input 48'also being connectedtoground via capacitor 70. A second monostable 72 identical to monostable 30 has an A input 74 which is connected to input 54 of AND gate 56 and a Q output 76 which is connected to input 34 of multivibrator 30. A timing capacitor 78 is connected between terminals 80 and 82 of monostable 72 and terminal 80 is connected by a resistor 84 to the supply line 46.

The timing terminal 40 of multivibrator 30 is connected via a resistor 90 to the collector of a transistor 92 the emitter of which is connected to supply line 46 and the base of which is connectedto the junction of resistors 94 and 96. The other. terminal of resistor 94 is connected to supply line 46 and the other terminal of resistor 96 is connected to terminal 98 of switch 9. The other terminal 100 of switch 9 is connected to ground. I

Terminal 82 of monostable 72 is connected through a resistor 102 to the collector of transistor 104 the emitter of which'is connected to supply line 46 and the base of which is also connected to supply line 46 via resistor 106. The base of transistor 104 is also connected via resistor 108 to the collector of transistor 110 the emitter of which. is connected to terminal 98 of switch 9 and the base of which is connected through resistor 112 to supply line 46. The collector of transistor 110 is also connected to supply line 45 via resistor 114.

The collector of transistor 110 is also connected via capacitor 116 to the collector of a transistor 118 which is also connected via a resistor 120 tosupply line 46. The emitter of transistor 118 is connected toterminal 98 of switch 9 and its base is connected via resistor 122 to supply line 46. A capacitor 124 is connected between the collector of transistor 110 and the base of transistor 118 and a capacitor 126 is connected between the collector of transistor ll8'and the base of transistor 124. The supply line 46 is connected to terminal 128 of switch the other terminal 130 of which 130 is connected to a power supply (not shown).

The Q output 76 of monostable 72 is connected to the input 64 of NAND gate 62 and to the B input 132 of a monostable 134, which may also be type SN74121, and has an A input 136 connected to ground and a 0 output 138. A timing capacitor 140 is connected between timing terminals 142 and 144 of monostable 134 and terminal 144 is also connected via resistor 146 to a reference voltage 148.

Q output 138 is connected via resistor 150 and capacitor 152 in series to the base of a transistor 154 the emitter of which is connected to power supply 156. The p base of transistor 154 is connected to power supply 156 via resistor 158 and the collector of transistor 154 is connected to ground via resistor 160. The collector of transistor 154 is also connected via resistor 162 and diode 164 in series to the gate 166 of a silicon controlled rectifier SCR 168. Gate 166 is connected via resistor 170 to ground. The cathode of SCR 168 is also connected to ground. The anode of SCR 168 is connected to a high voltage power supply 172 and to 21 capacitor 174, the other terminal of which is connected via resistor 176 to the cathode of laser diode 12. The anode of laser diode 12 is connected to earth. A protective diode 178 and a resistor 180 are connected in parallel across laser diode l2.

Monostables 30 and 72 are coupled together to form a multivibrator the pulse repetition frequency f of which is determined primarily by timing capacitors 42 and 78 and resistors 44 and 84. The schmidt triggers and 56 together with NAND gate 62 constitute a starting circuit to ensure that when power is supplied to the circuit by closure of switch 10 the circuit starts to oscillate. Monostable 134 is triggered by a pulse at the output 76 of monostable 72 to produce an output at Q output 138 which is amplified by transistor 154 and fires SCR 168. SCR 168 then discharges capacitor 174 through laser diode 12 which emits a pulse of infra red energy. It will be seen that the PRF of pulses from laser diode 12 is determined by the oscillation frcquencyfof a multivibrator formed by monostables 30 and 72.

This frequencyfmay be altered by switching in additional resistors and 102 by means of transistors 92 and 104. Unless switch 9 is closed the terminal 98 is floating and neither transistor 92 nor 104 nor nor 118 are conducting. When switch 9 is closed terminal 98 is grounded applying power to transistors 92, 104, 110 and 118. Transistor 92 is turned on and the effect of introducing resistor 90 into the timing circuit between terminal 40 and the power supply 46 is to change the frequency to a new higher frequency f Transistors 110 and 118 are cross coupled in known fashion to forma multivibrator and the potential at the collector of transistor 110 will alternate between ground and that of the supply terminal 46. The effect of this is to switch on transistor 104 during those periods when transistor 110 is conducting and its collector is at ground potential. When transistor 104is conducting resistor 102 is also brought into circuit between terminal 82 of monostable 72 and the supply 46; its effect is to raise the frequency of oscillation to a higher value Thus when switch 10 is operated the laser is fired at the first frequency f;; when switches 9 and 10 are both operated the PRF of light pulses from the laser alternates between higher frequencies f and f at a rate determined by the time constants of the multivibrator formed by transistors 110 and 118.

In operation detectors on the target 16 receive radiation from the beam and are connected to frequency selective circuits adapted to discriminate between signals representative of each of the modes of modulation selected by press buttons 9 and 10. The first mode of modulation at the single frequency f allows the soldier 1 to check that equipment on the target is switched on and is operating; a radio transmitter is mounted on the target and'transmits when the beam is incident on the detectors. Signals from this radio transmitter are received by aerial 7 and radio receiver 18 which is connected to operate the lamps 17in the eye piece 8 of the sight 5. Thus a visual indication is provided in the eye piece that the detectors and transmitter on the target tank are operative.

The frequency f is characteristic of the umpire s gun and is a different frequency from that employed in the weapon simulation system e.g. for attack. Accordingly frequency selective circuits in the target tank are arranged so that no indication is given in the target tank that the beam from the umpires gun is incident upon it.

Frequencies f and f}; on the other hand are the characteristic frequencies used in the weapon simulation system for attack and for kill. Protective circuits in the equipment on the target tank are arranged so that the target tank only responds to the kill" frequency 13 after it has already received a beam modulated at the attack frequency f This has the effect of reducing the susceptibility of the equipment on the target tank to spurious kills but it requires that the umpires gun operates first at attack frequency f and then at kill frequency f in order to effect a kill. This is provided by alternation between two frequencies f and f as described.

When the protective circuit is overcome and a kill signal is detected by the frequency selective circuits receiving the signal from the detector on the target, a relay is operated to disable some or all of the functions of the target vehicle.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for use with a responsive target forming part of a weapon training system the target being of the type having detecting means for detecting the incidence of electromagnetic radiation modulated in different modes and having transmitting means operably connected to said detecting means for transmitting radio signals in response to said incident radiation, and with a selective circuit connected to receive signals from said detecting means and responsive to a predetermined mode of modulation of said radiation corresponding to a kill signal, the apparatus comprising in combination a support body;

radiation source means mounted on said body for providing a collimated beam of electromagnetic radiation;

modulating means co-operating with said source for modulating said beam in at least first and second modes, said first modebeing selected to activate the transmitting means to transmit without activating the kill signal selective circuit, and said second mode being selected to activate said selective circuit on the target as a kill signal;

manually operable switch means connected to said modulating means for selecting at will each of said modes of modulation; and for causing the beam to be transmitted in said selected mode aiming means connected to said source and mounted on said body and aligned with said beam for aiming said beam at the target;

radio receiving means for receiving the radio signals transmitted from the target; and

indicating means connected to said receiving means for indicating that the detecting means on the target has detected the incidence of the beam.

2. Apparatus according to claim ll wherein said first and second modes of modulation are characterised by different modulating frequencies.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein one of said first and second modes of modulation is characterised by alternation between two modulating frequen- 4. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the indicating means provides in operation an indication visible through the aiming means.

5. Apparatus for use with a responsive target forming part of a weapon training system the target being equipped with detecting means for detecting the incidence of electromagnetic radiation and with transmitting means operably connected to said detectingmeans for transmitting radio signals in response to said incident radiation, and with a selective circuit connected to receive signals from said detecting means and responsive to only certain modes of modulation of said radiation corresponding to a kill signal, said apparatus comprising in combination collimating means; laser diode means for co-operating with said collimating means to produce a collimated beam of laser radiation, modulating means connected to said laser diode for delivering thereto pulses at selectable ones of a plurality of pulse repetition frequencies for modulating said beam in at least first and second modes, said first mode being selectable to activate said transmitting means to transmit without activating the selective circuit on the target and said second mode being characterized by alternation between two modulating frequencies and selectable to activate the selective circuit on the target as a kill" signal; manually operable switch means connected to said modulating means for selecting at will each of said modes of modulation and for causing the beam to be transmitted in said selected mode; aiming means connected to said source and aligned with said beam for aiming said beam at said target; a housing for supporting said collimating means, said laser diode means and said aiming means; radio receiving means for receiving the radio signals transmitted from the target in response to radiation from said beam incident on the target; and indicating means connected to said receiving means for indicating that the detecting means on the target has detected the incidence of the'beam. 6. A'weapon training system comprising a responsive target having means for detecting the incidence of modulated electromagnetic radiation, selective circuit means connected to receive signals from said means for detecting for responding to a unique mode of modulation corresponding to a kill signal; and transmitting means responsive to said means for detecting for transmitting radio signals indicative of 4 the receipt of incident radiation modulated in a mode other than a kill signal made on said target; and an umpires gun comprising a support body; radiation source means mounted on said body for providing a collimated beam of electromagnetic radiation modulation means for modulating said beam in first and second modes, said means for detecting being responsive to said first mode to transmit radio signals indicative of the incidence of radiation modulated in a mode other than said unique mode on said target, said second mode being identifiable by said selective circuit means as a kill signal; switch means connected to said modulating means for initiating transmission of a beam in a selected one of said modes; aiming means on said body for directing the beam at said target; radio receiver means for receiving radio signals from said transmitting means; and indicating means connected to said receiving means for indicating that said means for detecting has detected the incidence of the beam.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2077383 *Feb 24, 1936Apr 20, 1937Winchester Repeating Arms CoTesting apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3898747 *Jun 24, 1974Aug 12, 1975Us NavyLaser system for weapon fire simulation
US4111421 *Dec 9, 1976Sep 5, 1978The Magnavox CompanyOptical linked remote control video game apparatus
US4257612 *Dec 13, 1978Mar 24, 1981Walt Disney ProductionsOptoelectronic amusement device
US4306630 *Jan 28, 1980Dec 22, 1981Monte Anthony JRadio controlled miniature target vehicle and radio control accessory for binoculars
US4487583 *Jun 15, 1981Dec 11, 1984JaycorReceiver garment for weapons engagement simulation system
US4695058 *Jan 28, 1986Sep 22, 1987Photon Marketing LimitedSimulated shooting game with continuous transmission of target identification signals
US4924216 *Feb 12, 1988May 8, 1990Acemore International Ltd.Joystick controller apparatus
US5074793 *Jul 30, 1990Dec 24, 1991The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyMine effects simulator system
US6261180 *Feb 6, 1998Jul 17, 2001Toymax Inc.Computer programmable interactive toy for a shooting game
US6302796 *Jan 29, 1998Oct 16, 2001Toymax Inc.Player programmable, interactive toy for a shooting game
US6450817 *Jan 8, 1999Sep 17, 2002Dornier GmbhMethod for simulating the danger posed by hand grenades or mines to participants in a military exercise
US6890178 *Oct 16, 2003May 10, 2005Nec CorporatiionDigital pistol
US8100694 *Jun 11, 2007Jan 24, 2012The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyInfrared aimpoint detection system
US8403672Mar 26, 2013Tim OdorisioTraining target for an electronically controlled weapon
US20040123508 *Oct 16, 2003Jul 1, 2004Nec CorporationDigital pistol
US20110003269 *Jan 6, 2011Rocco PortogheseInfrared aimpoint detection system
EP2126508A4 *Dec 20, 2007Jan 23, 2013Pathfinder Events Pty LtdLive combat simulation
WO2008074082A1Dec 20, 2007Jun 26, 2008Pathfinder Events Pty LtdLive combat simulation
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/16, 434/22
International ClassificationF41J5/02, F41G3/26, F41J5/00, F41G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G3/2655, F41J5/02
European ClassificationF41J5/02, F41G3/26C1E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 1, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: LORAL EUROPE LIMITED, 580 GREAT CAMBRIDGE ROAD, EN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SCHLUMBERGER INDUSTRIES LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:005617/0220
Effective date: 19910128
Mar 1, 1991AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: LORAL EUROPE LIMITED, 580 GREAT CAMBRIDGE ROAD, EN
Effective date: 19910128
Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER INDUSTRIES LIMITED
Jan 14, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER INDUSTRIES LIMITED
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNORS:SOLARTRON ELECTRONIC GROUP LIMITED, THE;SCHLUMBERG ELECTRONICS (UK) LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:005587/0203
Effective date: 19901204
Jan 14, 1991AS01Change of name
Owner name: SCHLUMBERG ELECTRONICS (UK) LIMITED
Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER INDUSTRIES LIMITED
Owner name: SOLARTRON ELECTRONIC GROUP LIMITED, THE
Effective date: 19901204
Jan 9, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: SCHLUMBERGER ELECTRONICS (U.K.) LTD.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SOLARTRON ELCTRONIC GROUP, LTD. THE;REEL/FRAME:004206/0870
Effective date: 19831128