Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3847463 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateApr 11, 1973
Priority dateApr 11, 1973
Also published asCA982668A1
Publication numberUS 3847463 A, US 3847463A, US-A-3847463, US3847463 A, US3847463A
InventorsJ Chapman, R Hayward
Original AssigneeGilbert Engineering Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cable connector apparatus
US 3847463 A
Abstract
A cable connector apparatus for electrically connecting a coaxial cable to a fixed device such as a coupler or amplifier has a connector assembly adapted to be fixedly secured to a cable and a connector assembly adapted to be fixedly secured to the device. One of the connector assemblies is rotatably received within the other connector assembly. Respective pairs of contacts within each connector assembly are so disposed to transmit the electrical signal from the cable to the device despite relative rotation between the cable and the device. Mechanical means retain the connector assemblies in mechanical and electrical contact during relative rotation between the connector assemblies.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [19] Hayward et al.

[ Nov. 12, 1974 1 1 CABLE CONNECTOR APPARATUS [75] Inventors: Robert D. Hayward, Phoenix; James E. Chapman, Glendale, both of Ariz.

[73] Assignee: Gilbert Engineering Company, Inc.,

Phoenix, Ariz.

[22] Filed: Apr. 11, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 350,073

[52] US. Cl 339/8 P, 339/177 R [51] Int. Cl. l-I0lr 17/04, HOlr 39/00 [58] Field of Search 339/8, 177

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,422,961 6/1947 Hallstrand... 339/8 PB X 2,452,168 10/1948 Warren 339/8 PB 2,641,744 6/1953 De Packh et al. 339/8 PB 3,408,610 10/1968 Clarkson 339/8 R 3,622,939 11/1971 Forney 339/177 E X 3,671,922 6/1972 Zerlin et al. 339/177 R X 3.757279 9/1973 Winston 339/177 R 3,761,870 9/1973 Drezin et a1. 339/177 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,184,187 3/1970 Great Britain 339/177 R 1.242.731 6/1967 Great Britain 339/177R Primary Examiner-Joseph H. McGlynn Assistant ExaminerLawrence J Staab Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William H. Drummond; Gregory J. Nelson; Don .I. Flickinger the other connector assembly. Respective pairs of contacts within each connector assembly are so disposed to transmit the electrical signal from the cable to the device despite relative rotation between the cable and the device. Mechanical means retain the connector assemblies in mechanical and electrical contact during relative rotation between the connector assemblies.

1 Claim, 5 Drawing Figures CABLE CONNECTOR APPARATUS This invention relates to a cable connector appara-'' tus.

More particularly, the invention relates to a cable connector apparatus especially adapted for use in a cable antenna television (CATV) transmission system.

In a further and more specific respect, the invention concerns a cable connector apparatus for electrically and mechanically connecting a CATV cable to a stationary device such as a coupler or amplifier wherein the cable is permitted repeated cyclical rotational movement and vibration relative the device without impairment of the connection or damage to the cable.

In acable antenna television (CATV) system, a central antenna is situated in a remote location selected for proper reception of line-of-sight television signals. The signals are then transmitted to the individual subscribers television set by means of a coaxial cable and a series of active and passive devices. A primary cable extends from the central antenna to the area or neighborhood to be serviced, whereafter drop leads transmit the signals from the primary cable to the individual sub scriber.

Since the primary coaxial cable generally traverses an extended distance and accommodates numerous drop leads, a series of active and passive devices are required. For example, the primary coaxial cable generally having a diameter of approximately three-fourths inch loses signal strength at approximately one decibel per hundred feet. It is necessary that an amplifier be incorporated into the cable system approximately every 2,200 feet within the area to be serviced. The primary cable is terminated with a passive device from which secondary cables are used to service smaller residential areas. Within the limited area, the secondary cable transmits signals to a plurality of directional devices from which drop leads transmit the signal to the individual subscribers television set, e.g., the secondary cable may be supported in an alley between two rows of houses and at every other corner of a residential lot, a directional device may be employed to provide service to the four juxtaposed residential lots.

The primary and secondary coaxial cables extending between the central antenna and ultimate directional device are airborne cables supported by a plurality of spaced poles. Due to the necessary frequency of devices for both signal modification and junctional purposes, numerous connections are required in the installation of the cable system. Each active device requires two connections with the cable, one to receive the incoming signal from the previous section of cable and one to transmit the signal to the next sequential segment of cable. The directional devices,in addition to the above-noted connections, require several additional connections to transmit the signal to the individual drop leads. In accordance with conventional practice, as withother types of airborne cables, a certain amount of slack or sag is mintained in a coaxial cable y from pole to pole or from connection to connection to limit the tension upon the cable.

Due primarily to intermittent wind movement, the cable is subjected to various forces, including alternate rotation and vibration. If the coaxial cable, generally a tubular foil sheath with an inner wire conductor, is securely fastened to the terminal, the almost continuous device. This results in an inconvenience to the subscribers and imposes undue maintenance requirements upon the CATV system owners.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved cable connector apparatus.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved cable connector' apparatus for use in a CATV cable transmission system for connecting the coaxial transmission cable to a stationary coupler or other device.

Yet still another object of the present invention is to provide a connector apparatus for electrically and mechanically connecting a coaxial cable to a fixed terminal wherein the mechanical and electrical connection therebetween is maintained despite relative movement caused by repeated cycles of rotational movement or undulations of the cable.

Yet still another object of the present invention is to provide a connector apparatus of the above type in which the mechanical and electrical connection between the coaxial cable and the device may be readily and easily accomplished in field installations.

Briefly, to accomplish the desired objectives of the present invention, the cable connector apparatus comprises a pair of connector assemblies. A first connector assembly is adapted to be fixedly secured to the coaxial cable and provided with a pair of electrical contacts, one of which is electrically connected to the outer tubular conductor and the other of which is electrically connected to the inner conductor wire. A second connector assembly, also provided with a pair of electrical contacts, is fixedly secured to the fixed device. The first and second connector assemblies are so constructed that one of the connector assemblies is rotatably received within the other connectorassembly. When so received, each electrical contact within one of the connector assemblies effects electrical connection with a respective electrical contact within the other connector assembly. Each contact is annularly disposed whereby electrical contact is maintained during relative rotational .movement between. the two connector assemblies of the connector apparatus. Means are provided fordetachably engaging the connector assemblies and maintaining the electrical and mechanical connection and providing for the relative rotational movement as described above.-

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become more clearly apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the present invention taken in conjuction with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a typical fixed device having coaxial cables connected thereto with the connector apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of one of the connector apparatuses of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view, partially in section, specifically illustrating the elemental components of a preferred connector assembly especially adapted to be fixedly secured to a coaxial cable;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged perspective view, partly in phantom outline, especially detailing the element as denoted by the bracket 4 within FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is an elevation view in section taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

Turning now to the drawings, in which the same reference character indicates corresponding elements throughout the various views, attention is first directed to FIG. 1 which shows a device having a pair of coaxial cables 11 each connected thereto with a connector apparatus generally designated by the reference character 12 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the preferred embodiment of the present invention. While the device 10 herein shown does not represent any specific type of device used in CATV system, it is understood that the device generally represents any active or passive device which may be employed in the system. Although not specifically herein illustrated, it is understood that the under surface 13 of the device 10 may be adapted to receive a plurality of the connector apparatuses 12 to accommodate drop leads to individual subscribers television sets.

FIG. 2 illustrates a preferred embodiment of the connector apparatus 12 of the present invention as it would appear as employed in field practice to connect the coaxial cable 11 to the device 10. The representative coaxial cable 11 has an elongate tubular outer conductor 14 generally fabricated from a metal foil and an inner conductor wire 17 coaxially located within the tubular outer conductor. A dielectric 18, such as a polystyrene foam, insulates the inner conductor wire 17 from the tubular outer conductor 14. In the instant illustration, the outer conductor 14 is exposed to the atmosphere; however, alternate coaxial cables of the type used for CATV transmission may employ an outer protective jacket such as might be fabricated from polyethylene. In preparing the cable 11 for use with the connector apparatus of the present invention, a portion of the outer jacket 14 and dielectric 18 is stripped away to expose a length of the inner conductor wire 17. If the cable is of the type employing an outer protective jacket, a portion of the protective jacket must also be stripped away to expose a given length of the outer conductor.

The connector apparatus 12 has a connector assembly 19 adapted to be firmly secured to the coaxial cable 11 and a connector assembly 20 adapted to be fixedly secured to the device 10, the operative elemental components of which will be discussed in detail hereinafter. The cable 11 prepared as above-described is inserted through the aperture 21 of the union nut 22, the O-ring seal 23 and the aperture 24 of the dust shield 27. Thereafter, the cable 11 is inserted through the aperture 28 of the connector assembly 19 and securely affixed thereto. The device 10 has an aperture 29 therein which supports a female screw flight which threadedly engages the male screw flight 30 of the connector assembly 20. The O-ring seal 31 provides a water and dirt-free union between the device 10 and the connector assembly 20.

After preliminary preparation as described above, the connector assembly 19 is inserted into the connector assembly 20. The dust shield 27 is urged forwardly along the coaxial cable 11 to encase the connector assembly 19 and abut the connector assembly 20 and the O-ring 23 is positioned against the dust shield 27. The connection is completed by urging the union nut 22 along the cable 11 encasing the dust shield 27, the connector assembly 19 and threadedly engaging the connector 20. As will become apparent hereinafter, the connector 19, fixedlysecured to the coaxial cable 11, is rotatable within the connector assembly 20 and is held in mechanical and electrical connection by the union nut 22.

The connector assembly 19 is herein illustrated in detail in connection with FIGS. 3 and 4. First provided is a cylindrical outer conductor 32 having a reduced diameter forward section 33 and a female screw flight 34 within the rear portion. Longitudinal slits 37 divide the reduced diameter forward section 33 into a plurality of forwardly extending contact members. A collet 38 having a probe 39 extending forwardly therefrom is coaxially maintained within the outer conductor 32 by the insulator bushing 40 having an aperture 41 therein through which the probe 39 passes. An insulative outer covering 42, as shown in the phantom outline, encases the collet 38. The insulative outer covering 42 is provided with a flange 43 at the forward end which abuts the insulator bushing 40 and a conical rearward end 44 which cooperates with the collet closer 47 to fixedly retain the inner conductor wire 17 within the collet 38.

sized to receive the outer conductor 14 of the coaxial cable 11. The sleeve 50 has identically beveled edges 52 which mate with the beveled rearward end 53 of the axial bore 49 and the beveled face 54 of the ferrule 55. As will be understood by those skilled in the art, after the coaxial cable 11 has been inserted through the aperture 51 such that the inner conductor 17 extends into the collet 38 and the outer conductor 14 extends through the sleeve 50 threadedly engaging the male screw flight 56 of the union nut 48 and the female screw flight 34 of the outer conductor 32, subsequent rotation between the outer conductor and the cable nut compresses the sleeve 50 and the collet 38 to fixedly secure the outer conductor 14 and the inner conductor 17, respectively, for both mechanical and electrical connection.

Attention is now directed to FIG. 5 which shows the interaction of the operative elements of the connector assembly 19 securely affixed to the coaxial cable 11 and engaged within the connector assembly 20. The connector assembly 20 has an outer body or connector nut 60 which supports a coaxial center conductor 61 positionally maintained and insulated therefrom by the insulator bushing 62. A spring receptacle 63 integral with the rearward end of the center conductor 61 rotationally engages the probe 39 with frictional contact to insure an electrical connection between the center conductor 61 and the probe 39. First and second axial bores 64 and 67 rotationally and frictionally receive the outer conductor 32 and the reduced diameter portion 33, respectively, of the connector 19. As shown herein, the union nut 22 encases the connector 19 and is threadedly engaged with the connector 20 such as to permit the coaxial cable 11 and its associated connector assembly 19 to rotate freely relative the connector assembly 20 and the union nut 22. The dust shield 27 and associated O-rings 23 and 68 protect the electrical connections within the connector apparatus from dust, moisture and other corrosion producing influences.

The preferred embodiment as herein described utilizes the outer conductor 32 and the connector nut 60 as a first set of electrical contacts between the outer conductor 14 of the coaxial cable and the device 10. The probe 39, engaged within the receptacle 63, functions as a second pair of electrical contacts to provide an electrical connection between the center conductor 17 and the center conductor 61. Although not herein illustrated, the center conductor 61 is received within the device by a conventional phone jack type receptacle. The union nut 22 securely engages the connector assembly 20 to maintain the connector assembly 19 therewithin and insure electrical connection between the first and second pairs of contacts despite repeated cycles of relative rotation between the connector assembly l9 and the connector assembly 20 and the coaxial cable 11 and the device 10, respectively.

It will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that the connector apparatus hereinafter described in connection with the preferred embodiment may be variously; and alternately constructed. For example, the union nut 22 would function adequately by encasing the connector 20 and being fixedly secured to the connector assembly 19. Similarly, the connector assemblies l9 and 20 may assume reverse configurations wherein the connector assembly associated with the device is received within the connector assembly associated with the coaxial cable.

Having fully described and disclosed the present invention and the preferred embodiment thereof in such clear and concise terms as to enable those skilled in the art to understand and practice the same, the invention claimed is:

1. An assembly for connecting a coaxial cable to a fixed device, said coaxial cable including an elongate tubular outer conductor, and

an inner conductor wire coaxially located within said tubular outer conductor and spaced therefrom by a dielectric,

said connector apparatus comprising a pair of connector assemblies, including:

a. a connector assembly to be fixedly secured to said coaxial cable including I i. a cylindrical ou'ter conductor body having a plurality of contact members extending forwardly therefrom and a screw flight proximate the rear portion thereof,

ii. a collet within said outer conductor body and insulated therefrom to receive said inner conductor wire and having a probe extending forwardly therefrom,

iii. a collet closer associated with said collet,

iv. a compressible sleeve sized to receive said outer conductor, and

v. a nut having a bore to receive said cable therethrough and threadedly engageable with said outer conductor body,

said nut interacting with said sleeve and said collet closer as said nut is advanced along said screw flight to close said collet about said inner conductor wire and to clamp said sleeve about said outer conductor; b. a connector assembly to be fixedly secured to said device including i. an outer conductor body having a first axial bore therein sized to rotationally an frictionally receive said cylindrical outer conductor,

ii. a second axial bore within said outer conductor body sized to rotationally and frictionally receive said contact fingers, and

iii. a receptacle to rotationally and frictionally receive said probe,

said receptacle being electrically insulated from said outer conductor body; and

c. a union nut sized to rotatably encase one of said connector assemblies and engageable with the other of said connector assemblies to maintain said connector assemblies in mechanical and electrical connection.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422961 *Mar 24, 1943Jun 24, 1947Gen ElectricRotating joint for concentric cables
US2452168 *Mar 1, 1945Oct 26, 1948Chiksan Tool CompanySwivel type coaxial connector
US2641744 *May 11, 1945Jun 9, 1953De Packh David CCoupling device for relatively rotatable coaxial cables
US3408610 *Apr 10, 1967Oct 29, 1968Anthony T. ClarksonRotatable coaxial coupling
US3622939 *Feb 27, 1970Nov 23, 1971Amp IncCoaxial cable connection system
US3671922 *Aug 7, 1970Jun 20, 1972Bunker RamoPush-on connector
US3757279 *May 15, 1972Sep 4, 1973Jerrold Electronics CorpTor diameters electrical connector operable for diverse coaxial cable center conduc
US3761870 *Jul 26, 1972Sep 25, 1973Tidal Sales CorpCo-axial connector including positive clamping features for providing reliable electrical connections to the center and outer conductors of a co-axial cable
GB1184187A * Title not available
GB1242731A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3983457 *Feb 18, 1976Sep 28, 1976Hughes Aircraft CompanyCoax cable seizure device
US4226495 *Apr 27, 1979Oct 7, 1980Texscan CorporationCable system subscriber tap with rotating center conductor seizure apparatus and spiral contact and method for using same
US4447107 *Mar 25, 1982May 8, 1984Major Jr Frederick ACollet for cable connector
US4590337 *Nov 28, 1984May 20, 1986Engelmore Anthony RRotatable electrical connector for coiled telephone cords
US4676577 *Mar 27, 1985Jun 30, 1987John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Connector for coaxial cable
US4773866 *Sep 26, 1986Sep 27, 1988Basques Eric ORotatable electrical connector
US4854893 *Nov 30, 1987Aug 8, 1989Pyramid Industries, Inc.Coaxial cable connector and method of terminating a cable using same
US4923412 *Jul 20, 1989May 8, 1990Pyramid Industries, Inc.Terminal end for coaxial cable
US4952174 *Feb 22, 1990Aug 28, 1990Raychem CorporationCoaxial cable connector
US5011432 *Aug 28, 1990Apr 30, 1991Raychem CorporationCoaxial cable connector
US5167521 *Aug 30, 1991Dec 1, 1992Robert Bosch GmbhPlug connector with watertight yet gas-porous seal
US5277590 *Apr 1, 1992Jan 11, 1994Kings Electronics Co., Inc.Swiveling angled cable connector
US5338225 *May 27, 1993Aug 16, 1994Cabel-Con, Inc.Hexagonal crimp connector
US5352134 *Jun 21, 1993Oct 4, 1994Cabel-Con, Inc.RF shielded coaxial cable connector
US5439386 *Jun 8, 1994Aug 8, 1995Augat Inc.Quick disconnect environmentally sealed RF connector for hardline coaxial cable
US5499934 *Jul 7, 1994Mar 19, 1996Cabel-Con, Inc.Hexagonal crimp connector
US5548088 *Jan 22, 1993Aug 20, 1996Itt Industries, LimitedElectrical conductor terminating arrangements
US5651698 *Dec 8, 1995Jul 29, 1997Augat Inc.Coaxial cable connector
US5695363 *Dec 23, 1994Dec 9, 1997Raychem CorporationLocking coaxial cable connector and adaptor
US5944545 *Aug 29, 1997Aug 31, 1999Talley Defense Systems, Inc.Single pin coaxial initiator, retainer and connector and method of operation
US6089912 *Oct 21, 1997Jul 18, 2000Thomas & Betts International, Inc.Post-less coaxial cable connector
US6159046 *Jul 12, 1999Dec 12, 2000Wong; Shen-ChiaEnd connector and guide tube for a coaxial cable
US6203370 *Feb 3, 1999Mar 20, 2001Noel LeeElectrical connector with an o-ring
US6331123Jul 11, 2001Dec 18, 2001Thomas & Betts International, Inc.Connector for hard-line coaxial cable
US6491546Mar 7, 2000Dec 10, 2002John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Locking F terminator for coaxial cable systems
US6612849May 21, 2002Sep 2, 2003Charles Howard ScottRotatable coupler for RF/UHF cables
US6773303 *Apr 30, 2003Aug 10, 2004Gih Sheng Co., Ltd.Coaxial cable having easily attached coupler
US6848939Jun 24, 2003Feb 1, 2005Stirling Connectors, Inc.Coaxial cable connector with integral grip bushing for cables of varying thickness
US6884115May 22, 2003Apr 26, 2005Thomas & Betts International, Inc.Connector for hard-line coaxial cable
US7018235Dec 14, 2004Mar 28, 2006Corning Gilbert Inc.Coaxial cable connector
US7182639Sep 23, 2005Feb 27, 2007Corning Gilbert Inc.Coaxial cable connector
US7214095Oct 19, 2005May 8, 2007John Mezzalingua Associates, Inc.Sealing security shield
US7422477 *Dec 4, 2007Sep 9, 2008John Mezzalingva Assoc., Inc.Insulator for coaxial cable connectors
US7632143Nov 24, 2008Dec 15, 2009Andrew LlcConnector with positive stop and compressible ring for coaxial cable and associated methods
US7635283Nov 24, 2008Dec 22, 2009Andrew LlcConnector with retaining ring for coaxial cable and associated methods
US7731529Nov 24, 2008Jun 8, 2010Andrew LlcConnector including compressible ring for clamping a conductor of a coaxial cable and associated methods
US7785144Nov 24, 2008Aug 31, 2010Andrew LlcConnector with positive stop for coaxial cable and associated methods
US7798848Jan 29, 2009Sep 21, 2010Andrew LlcInner contact supporting and biasing insulator
US7931499Jan 28, 2009Apr 26, 2011Andrew LlcConnector including flexible fingers and associated methods
US7976339Jan 7, 2008Jul 12, 2011Ideal Industries, Inc.Cable connector with bushing that permits visual verification
US8136234Nov 24, 2008Mar 20, 2012Andrew LlcFlaring coaxial cable end preparation tool and associated methods
US20100171307 *Jan 5, 2010Jul 8, 2010Marlin Manufacturing CorporationFitting assembly with ferrule
EP0124300A2 *Apr 4, 1984Nov 7, 1984THOMAS & BETTS CORPORATION (a New Jersey Corporation)Connector for coaxial cable
WO1986003360A1 *May 30, 1985Jun 5, 1986Anthony R EngelmoreRotatable electrical connector for coiled telephone cords
WO1993016506A1 *Jan 22, 1993Aug 19, 1993Itt Ind LtdElectrical connectors
WO1993016507A1 *Jan 22, 1993Aug 19, 1993Itt Ind LtdImprovements relating to electrical conductor terminating arrangements
WO1999010954A1 *Aug 27, 1998Mar 4, 1999Talley Defense Systems IncSingle pin coaxial initiator, retainer and connector and method of operation
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/28, 439/578
International ClassificationH01R24/02, H01R9/05, C07C17/20
Cooperative ClassificationC07C17/208, H01R9/05
European ClassificationC07C17/20D6, H01R9/05
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 16, 1986AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: GILBERT ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF AZ
Effective date: 19860630
Owner name: GILBERT ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC., NEW YORK, NEW Y
Jul 16, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: GILBERT ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC., NEW YORK, NEW Y
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GILBERT ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF AZ;REEL/FRAME:004610/0120
Effective date: 19860630
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GILBERT ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF AZ;REEL/FRAME:004610/0120