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Publication numberUS3847502 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateDec 2, 1972
Priority dateOct 1, 1971
Publication numberUS 3847502 A, US 3847502A, US-A-3847502, US3847502 A, US3847502A
InventorsIsbell J
Original AssigneeIsbell J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conveying and force producing means
US 3847502 A
Abstract
A means for conveying an object or producing a force. The conveying and force producing means includes a movable metal slug slidably mounted in a tube. There is provided a fluid system to cause movement of the slug in the tube. A magnet on the outside of the tube is coupled by electromagnetic force to the slug and follows the movements of the slug to produce a force and perform work, such as moving an object. An alternate embodiment is provided in which the magnet is on the inside of the tube and the metal slug is on the exterior of the tube. A third embodiment is provided in which the tube is endless, i.e., having the shape of a ring, and a plurality of spaced apart slugs are forced to travel within the endless tube, i.e., by the fluid system. A plurality of outer members is included, i.e., one for each slug which are interconnected to a concentric common shaft. The outer members or the slugs are magnetized to cause the outer member to follow the spinning slugs, thus rotational force is imparted to the shaft.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[76] lnventor:

I United States Patent [1 1 [shell CONVEYING AND FORCE PRODUCING MEANS Joe A. Isbell, 5299 Mesquite Rd., Memphis, Tenn. 38117 [22 Fileds Dec.2, 1972 21 Appl.,No.: 317,078

Related 0.8. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 185,533, Oct. 1,

1971, abandoned.

[52] U.S. Cl 415/92, 415/202, 417/410,

310/104 [51] Int. Cl. F0ld 1/00 [58 Field of Search 104/156; 418/158; 415/92,

References Cited 1 Nov. 12, 1974 Primary ExaminerC. J. Husar Attorney, Agent, or Firm-John R. Walker. 111

[57] ABSTRACT A means for conveying an object or producing a force. The conveying and force producing means includes a movable metal slug slidably mounted in a tube. There is provided a fluid system to cause movement of the slug in the tube. A magnet on the outside of the tube is coupled by electromagnetic force to the slug and follows the movements of the slug to produce a force and perform work, such as moving an object. An alternate embodiment is provided in which the magnet is on the inside of the tube and the metal slug is on the exterior of the tube. A third embodiment is provided in which the tube is endless, i.e., having the shape of a ring, and a plurality of spaced apart slugs are forced to travel within the endless tube, i.e., by the fluid system. A plurality of outer members is included, i.e., one for each slug which are interconnected to a concentric common shaft. The outer members or the slugs are magnetized to cause the outer member to follow the spinning slugs, thus rotational force is imparted to the shaft.

17 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures PATENTEDHUY 12 I974 318471502 SHEEI 30$ 4 FIG. 8

PATENTEUHUY 1 2 I974 sum nor 4 CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application entitled CONVEYING AND FORCE PRODUCING MEANS, Ser. No. 185,533. filed Oct. 1, 1971, and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to conveying and force producing means.

2. Description of the Prior Art Heretofore, in fields such as the elevator field, there have been hydraulic elevators in which either air or hydraulic fluid drives a piston which is directly connected to the elevator cab to cause raising and lowering thereof. Also, another type of commonly known elevator has been the electric motor driven elevator in which the electric motor, through pulleys and cables, which support the cab and are attached thereto, moves the elevator upwardly and downwardly.

A preliminary patentability search revealed the following U.S. Pat. Nos.: 573,820, issued Dec. 22, 1896; 613,627, issued Nov. 1, 1898; 827,282, issued July 31, 1906; 1,231,075 issued June 26, 1917; 2,222,685, issued Nov. 26, 1940; and 2,927,661, issued Mar. 8, 1960. None of the above patents show or suggest applicants device.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is directed towards providing a means for producing a force and perform work such as conveying an object. It is an object of the present invention to provide such a conveying or force producing means in which a driving member or slug is not coupled directly to the driven structure, but instead is coupled electro-magnetically. Thus, one of the concepts of the present invention is to provide a tube, a metallic slug slidably mounted in the tube, a fluid system for supplying fluid to the tube to move the slug, a movable object, and a magnet slidably mounted on the exterior of the tube adjacent the slug for magnetically coupling the object to the slug for moving the object to follow the movements of the slug. Also, it is a concept of the present invention that the magnet and the slug may be reversed, that is, the magnet may be disposed on the interior of the tube and the slug on the outside. To clarify, the magnet and the slug coact together to create a magnetic means for magnetically coupling the magnet to the slug to cause the magnet to move along with the slug. It should be apparent that the slug includes a magnetic substance capable of being magnetized or attracted by a magnet. Further, the tube may be endless, i.e., being in the form of a ring, with a plurality of spaced apart slugs which are forced to travel or spin within the tubular ring by the fluid system. This latter concept also includes a plurality of outer members, i.e., one for each slug, which are interconnected to a shaft that is concentrically disposed within the tubular ring. Either the outer members or the slugs are magnets to magnetically couple them together. This causes the outer members to follow the spinning slugs, thus rotational force is imparted to the shaft. Other objects of the present invention will be more apparent from the following description and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a vertical cross sectional view of the means of the present invention shown as arranged for horizontal conveying or for producing a horizontal force, and' with certain parts being shown schematically.

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of the means of the present invention shown as applied to an elevator and with certain parts being shown schematically.

FIG. 3 is a view similar to a portion of the view of FIG. 1 showing an alternative form of the present invention. i.e.,

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a third embodiment of the present invention for producing a rotational force.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken as on the line VV of FIG. 4, showing the inner member as a metallic slug and the outer member as a permanent magnet.

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of the third embodiment showing several units as depicted in FIG. 4 ganged to one common shaft.

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of the ganged units as depicted in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 5, showing the inner member as a metallic elongated slug and the outer member as an electromagnet.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken as on the line IXIX of FIG. 8 but showing the inner member as a permanent magnet and the outer member as a metallic ring.

FIG. 11 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 10 but showing the inner member as a non-magnetic cannister filled with granules of a metallic substance and the outer member as a permanent magnet.

FIG. 12 is a sectional view also similar to FIG. 10 but showing the inner member as a metal sphere and the outer member as a permanent magnet.

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. 9 except showing the embodiment of FIG. 12.

FIG. 14 is a side elevational view of a fourth embodiment which is similar to the principal embodiment but showing a steam generator for initially causing the slug to move along the tube and additional steam generators downstream from the initial one to provide a booster means for causing the slug to continue to move along as the pressure from the initial one diminishes.

FIG. 15 is an enlarged sectional view taken as on the line XVXV of FIG. 14 showing structure for cooling and drying the steam to cause a turbulent tornado action within the tube.

FIG. 16 is a sectional view taken as on the line XVI- XVI of FIG. 15.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring first to FIG. 1 wherein the conveying means 11 of the present invention is shown to move an object or cause a force to act horizontally, the conveying means 11 includes a tube 13, which is shown as a cylindrical tube, although it may be other shapes, such as being square in cross section, without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. An inner member or slug 15 is slidably mounted in tube 13 with 0 rings 17 or the like being mounted in grooves, not shown, in slug 15 to form a seal between slug 15 and the interior of tube 13 to prevent fluid from passing between slug 15 and the tube 13. Slug 15 is preferably formed from a metal which is not permanently magnetized, e.g., a non-magnetized piece of steel or ferromagnetic substance, but may be permanently magnetized, if desired, e.g., having an opposite polarity with respect to the magnet 33 for increasing the coupling force therebetween. Slug 15 is preferably, though not necessarily, tapered as at 19 and 21 adjacent the opposite ends thereof. In the example shown in FIG. 1, the slug 15 is circular in cross section, although it will be understood that the cross sectional shape of the slug should preferably correspond to the cross sectional shape of the tube 13.

' A fluid system 23 is provided for supplying fluid to tube 13 to move slug 15. Thus, in the example shown in FIG. 1, fluid system 23 includes a reservoir 25 containing hydraulic fluid 27 and a pump 29 interposed in a suitable conduit 31 leading from the reservoir 25 to one end of tube 13 for supplying hydraulic fluid under pressure to one end (the end to the left in FIG. 1) of slug 15 so that the slug 15 moves to the right, as viewed in FIG. 1, along the tube 13. It will be understood, of course, that if desired, a more elaborate fluid system 23 may be provided without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, for example, to reverse or stop the slug 15 additionalconduits, valves, etc., not shown, well known to those skilled in the art, may be provided;

An outer member, preferably in the form of a magnet 33 is slidably mounted on the exterior of tube 13 adjacent slug 15 to provide a magnetic field F in which slug 15 is disposed so that as slug 15 moves along tube 13, magnet 33 will move along with the slug 15 and provide a horizontal force 34. This force 34 can be utilized to move an object 35 either directly or through a plate 37 attached to and supported by magnet 33, and which plate 37 is also itself an object. It will be understood that with the plate 37 disposed as shown in FIG. 1, object 35 should be fixed thereto by suitable means, not shown. Also, any other desired work may be done by force 34, as by the force acting to pull or push any desired object.

Magnet 33 is preferably an electro-magnet having the usual coils 41 energized through conductors such as conductors 43 by a source of electricity connected thereto, as battery 45. It will be understood that to disconnect magnet 33 from slug 15, it is only necessary to open switch 47 which is interposed in conductors 43. Also, it will be understood that, if desired, magnet 33 may be a permanent magnet, without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. In addition, it should be pointed out that tube 13 is formed of a non-magnetic substance, e.g., aluminum,'for allowing free passage of lines of force therethrough to couple the slug 15 with the magnet 33.

Referring now to FIG. 2, there is shown the conveying means 11 of the present invention in another application, that is, being used as an elevator, in which case the tube 13 is disposed in a vertical position to raise and lower the object 35. The fluid system 49 is more elaboratelyshown for causing upward and downward movement of the slug 15. Thus, fluid System49 includes a pump 51 for pumping the fluid, as hydraulic fluid, compressed air or the like, and suitable conduits shown, with valves 53, 55, 57, 59 and 61 interposed therein,

for directing the fluid to the upper or lower end of the slug 15 to move the slug upwardly or downwardly. Thus, it will be understood that with pump 51 pumping in the direction shown, and with the valves 55 and 57 being closed and with valves 53, 59 and 61 being open, the slug 15 will move upwardly to carry magnet 33, plate 37 and object 35 upwardly. Then, it will be understood that if it is desired to stop the movement of slug 15, plate 37 and object 35, the valves 53,55 and 61 are closed and valves 57 and 59 are disposed in an open position to bypass the fluid back to the pump 51. Also, when it is desired to lower slug 15, plate 37 and object 35, valves 53 and 59 are closed and valves 55, 57 and 61 are opened. In addition, it will be understood that magnet 33 may be released from following the movements of slug 15 by opening switch 47.

Referring now to FIG. 3, which shows a modification of the present invention in which the inner member is in the form of a magnet 63 in the interior of tube 13 and the outer member is in the form of metallic slug 65 on the exterior of the tube 13, magnet 63 is in the form of a permanent magnet although it may be in the form of an electro-magnet without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Slug 65 is preferably formed from a metal which is not permanently magnetized, e.g., a non-magnetized piece of steel or ferromagnetic substance, but may be permanently magnetized, if desired, i.e., having an opposite polarity with respect to the magnet 63 for increasing the coupling force therebetween. Slug 65 is preferably annular in shape and slidably mounted on the exterior of tube 13.

If it is desired to reduce friction, slug 65 may be provided with non-magnetic rollers, not'shown, engaging the outer surface of tube 13. The remaining portions of the system, not shown, in FIG. 3 may be as previously disclosed for the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 2, and may be utilized for conveying, elevating, or force pro ducing purposes in the same manner as that described for the embodiments of-FIGS. 1 and 2. 1 FIGS. 6 and 7 of the drawings depict a third embodi ment of .the present invention character referenced therein by the numeral 211 and herein described as a conveying and rotary force producing assembly. The assembly 211 includes at least one unit 212, as depicted in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, comprising an endless tube 213 similar to the tube 13 but having the shape of a ring, as clearly shown in the drawings. Additionally, a plurality of spaced apart inner members or a first set of members 215 are provided and are received within the endless tube 213. The inner members 215 are fixedly attached one to the other by a plurality of arcuate shafts 216 to establish a predetermined spaced interval therebetween for reasons yet to be disclosed.

The endless tube 213 preferably is provided with a plurality of inlet conduits 217, 217, 217" and a'plurality of outlet conduits 219, 219', 219". An intake manifold 218 is included and communicates the inlet conduits 217, 217', 217' one with the other. An exhaust manifold 220 is included which communicates the outlet conduits 219, 219', 219 one with the other. A fluid system 223 is provided for supplying fluid to the intake manifold 218, thence to the endless tube 213 to move the first set of members or inner members'215, The fluid system 223 may be somewhat similar to the previously described fluid system 23 or it may be in the form of a steam generator or the like. In other words, the endless tube 213 may be suitably adapted for receiving steamto drive the. inner members 215 or it may be substance which will readily allow uninterrupted passage of magnetic lines of force. Additionally, the inlet conduits 217', 217" or the outlet conduits 219, 219 may optionally be deleted from the unit 212 without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. In this event, it would be obvious to delete the appropriate manifold 218 or 220 also.

The unit 212 also includes a suitably journaled shaft 225 which is received within the ring formed by the endless tube 213 and with the endless tube 213 being concentric to the shaft 225. A plurality of spaced apart outer members or a second set of members 227 are provided and are fixedly attached to the shaft 225. More specifically, a plurality of spokes 229 are included which radiate outwardly from the shaft 225 with the inner ends thereof being fixedly attached to the shaft 225, as by welding or the like. The respective outer member 227 are fixedly attached to the outer ends of the spokes 229, as by welding or the like. The second set of members 227 are disposed adjacent the exterior of the endless tube 213 at locations along the circumference thereof which respectively are in proximity to the first set of members 215. In other words, the predetermined spaced interval of the inner members 215 alluded to above corresponds to the spaced apart distance of the second set of members 227. Either the first set of members 215 or the second set of members 227 constitute magnets for respectively magnetically coupling the other set of members therewith to cause the second set of members 227 to move along with the first set of members 215, thus a rotary force is imparted to the shaft 225.

From FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, it may be seen that the first set of inner members 215 have an elongated cylindrical shape thereto. members 215 are preferably formed from a metal which is not permanently magnetized, e.g., a non-magnetized piece of steel or ferro-magnetic substance, but may be permanently magnetized, if desired, i.e., having an opposite with respect to the outer member 227. Additionally, the second set or outer members 227 preferably are individually formed from a plurality of permanently magnetized ferromagnetic substances 227a 227g which may be,

suitably arranged to have the magnetic forces thereof additive and establishing an opening 231. The opening accommodates the inlet and outlet conduits 217, 219 as well as suitable support structure, e.g., brace members 232 preferably formed from a non-magnetic substance. In other words, the brace members 232 may pass through the openings 231 to support the endless tube 213 in a fixed disposition with respect to suitable frame structure (not shown).

From FIGS. 6 and 7 of the drawings, it may be seen that the assembly 211 includes at least a plurality of endless tubes 213, 213', and 213". The plurality of endless tubes 213, 213, 213 are arranged one behind another and have the respective spokes 229, 229' 229" fixedly attached to the common shaft 225 which increases the force being produced therewith. It should be pointed out that the endless tubes 213, 213', 213" respectively have intake manifolds 218, 218, 218" and exhaust manifolds 220, 220', 220 communicated therewith, i.e., substantially as above disclosed for the manifolds 218, 220. From FIG. 6 of the drawings, it may be seen that the intake manifolds 218, 218', 218" communicate with a common intake manifold 218" and the exhaust manifolds 220, 220', 220" communicate with a common exhaust manifold 220". Further, the preferred arrangement of the outer members 227, 227, 227" is depicted in FIG. 7. The tubes 213, 213" each have inner members (not shown) substantially identical to the structure above described for the inner members 215.

An optional arrangement of the above-disclosed structure is depicted in FIG. 8 of the drawings. In other words, the outer members may comprise electromagnets 233 similar to the electro-magnet 33 previously described in the principal embodiment. In other words, the electro-magnet 233 has the usual coils 241 energized through conductors such as conductors 243 by a source of electricity connected thereto, as battery 245. It will be understood that to disconnect magnet 233 from the inner member 215, it is only necessary to open switch 247 which is interposed in conductors 243.

In this regard, it should be understood that the inner members 215 may optionally be spherical shaped without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Another optional arrangement of the abovedisclosed structure is depicted in FIGS. 9 and 10 of the drawings wherein the inner members 263 are formed from a metalwhich is permanently magnetized, e.g., a permanently magnetized piece of steel or ferromagnetic substance, and outer members 265 are formed from a non-magnetized piece of steel or ferromagnetic substance. Alternatively, outer members 265 may be formed from a permanently magnetized metal, i.e., having an opposite polarity with respect to inner members 263 for increasing the coupling force therebetween. Therefore, the outer members 265 are magnetically coupled to the inner members 263 and move along therewith in the same manner as the previously described inner and outer members 63, 65.

In this regard, it should be pointed out that the inner members 215 and/or 263 constitute elongated slugs having leading and trailing ends as depicted in FIG. 9 of the drawings by the respective numerals 267, 269, i.e., the direction of rotation of the unit 212 being counterclockwise, as when viewed in FIG. 4 of the drawings. More specifically, the inner members 215 and/or 263 have inner and outer sides 271, 273 thereto. The inner side 271 is directed toward the journaled shaft 225 and the outer side is remote therefrom. Additionally, the leading ends 267 are convex-shaped, having a non-regular radius curvature thereto, i.e., the radius gradually increases from a point adjacent the longitudinal centerline of the slugs 215, 263 toward the outer side 273 thereof and the radius curvature gradually decreases from the longitudinal centerline toward the inner side 271. In other words, the convex leading ends 267 have a somewhat teardrop cross sectional shape thereto substantially as depicted in FIG. 9 of the drawings. Additionally, the trailing ends 269 have a concave shape or a regular radius curvature thereto substantially as depicted in FIG. 9 of the drawings.

7 Another optional arrangement of the above disclosed structure is depicted in FIG. 11 of the drawings wherein the first set of members or inner members may constitute non-magnetic cannisters 275, e.g., the cannisters 275 may be formed from aluminum or the like. The

stood that the inner members may be formed from a,

magnetic substance, e.g., soft iron or the like, having a cladding of extremely wear resistant material thereabout, e.g., steel or the like.

In this regard, it should be pointed out that centrifugal force causes the inner members to tend to be thrown outwardly from the shaft 225, i.e., creating additional wear on the outer sides 273 thereof. Therefore, it may be desirable, in order to compensate for a given centrifugal force, to concentrate the magnetic force of the outer members 227 adjacent the spokes 229. More specifically, I anticipate that certain of the magnets depicted in FIG. of the drawings may be omitted without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, e.g., the magnets 227d, 227e, 227f, 227g. It should be understood that the magnetic force of the remaining magnets, e.g., 227a, 227b, 227c would be calculated to counteract the centrifugal force of the inner member 215 at a specified rpm of the shaft 225 in a manner obvious to those skilled in the art. In other words, the outer members 227 are magnetized so that the poles are spaced radially, e.g., the south pole adjacent the inner side of the magnet and the north pole adjacent the outer side. Also, the same principle is preferably applied to theelectro-magnet 233. In other words, the magnet 233 may be wound in a manner known to those skilled in the art so that the magnetic force will counteract the centrifugal force.

I anticipate that under certain conditions it may be desirable that the inner members be spherical in shape, i. e., like the member 278 depicted in FIGS. 12 and 13 of the drawings. Like inner members 215, which are attached one to theother by a plurality of arcuate shafts 216, the spherical members 278 are intercoupled by a plurality of arcuate shafts 216 to maintain the spacing between spherical members 278. However, the coupling between shafts 216' and spheres 278 is such that the spheres are adapted to rotate so that they can roll on the interior of, tube 213. Thus, at the ends of shafts 216 are respectively provided rings 279 fixedly attached to shafts 216 by supports 280, and which rings 279 have sockets 279' shaped to conform to the curvature of spheres 278 so that the spheres can easily rotate therein. It will be noted that rings 279 are smaller in diameter than spheres 278 and fit on the opposite sides of the spheres with the rings being spaced from the interior surface of tube 213. It will be understood that, if desired, shafts 216, supports 280, and rings 279 may be omitted without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Additionally, it should be pointedout that the outer members 227 depicted in FIGS. 11, 12 and 13 of the drawings are preferably formed from a permanently magnetized metal, e.g.,

steel or a ferro-magnetic substance having lines of force coupling the appropriate inner member thereto, i.e., granules of soft iron 227 or spherical shaped member 279. However, it should be pointed out that either the inner member or the outer member or both may be picted in FIGS. 14 16 of the drawings and is character referenced therein by the numeral 311. The fourth embodiment 311 is somewhat similar to the principal embodiment 11 in that the tubular member 313 is substantially straight and has an indefinite length thereto. In fact, it is anticipated that the tubular member 313 may extend from one distant point to another, as for example, from one city to another for reasons yet to be disclosed. An inner member 315 is slidably received in the tubular member 313. Inner member 315 preferably is formed from a metal which is not permanently magnetized, e.g., a non-magnetized piece of steel or ferromagnetic substance, but may be permanently magnetized, if desired, as heretofore explained relative to the other embodiments. The inner member 315 has a shape thereto substantially like that previously disclosed for the inner member 263 except the inner member 315 would have a cylindrical shape, i.e., straight sides rather than curved. Therefore, it would be redundant to describe in detail the shape of the inner member 315. Also, it will be understood that inner member 315 may be other shapes, e.g., like sphere 278, without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Also, it will be understood that more than one inner member 315 (or sphere 278) may be provided with or without shafts 216 (or 216'), without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Inorder to have a complete understanding of the forces acting upon the inner member 315 (or 278), a complete understanding of tornadoes would be beneficial. A complete dissertation on tornadoes will not be attempted herein; however, a few important aspects thereof will be cited. First, tornadoes are formed under specific unstable atmospheric conditions involving lay ers of air with contrasting temperatures, moisture contents, densities, and wind flows. Secondly, complicated energy exchanges within these unstable air systems pro duce the vortex, which is the whirling funnel of rotating winds. Third, researchers seem to agree that tornadoes are caused by the combined effects of two kinds of forces, e.g., thermal or those involving the transfer of heat and mechanical or those involving rotating winds.

through of the warm air at a particular location in the cold air mass. After this breakthrough, the warm lower air forces its way upward and the heavier cool air drops down, thus a rotary'flow of air is created that'may form into a tornado vortex. Wind currents spinning inward and upward create the vacuum at the eye or center. The violent whirling action of the winds inward and upvivard movement is the main characteristic of a torna 0.

Referring again to FIGS. 14 and 16 of the drawings, it may be seen that the fourth embodiment 311 includes a means 317 for introducing a non-stable turbulent mass of fluid into the tubular member 313 at least at one location along the length thereof to slidably move the inner member 315 (or 278) along the tubular preferably has some of the member 313. The means 317 includes a steam generator 319 which delivers steam under pressure through a conduit 321 to the interior of the inner member 315. From FIG. 14 of the drawings, it may be seen that the conduit 321 joins the tubular member 313 at an angle which causes the steam to be concentrated at a downstream point 323 within the tubular member 313. A conduit 325 also communicates the steam generator 31.9.with the tubular member 313. However, the steam from the steam generator 319 passes through a cooling section 327 which is clearly illustrated in FIGS. 15 and 16 of the drawings. Accordingly, the steam emanating from the steam generator 319 is drastically cooled and moisture removed therefrom in a manner yet to be described. It should be noted that the cooling section 327 is connected to the tubular member 313 at a location substantially directly above the point 323, therefore setting up the two kinds of forces above-described. In other words, the hot steam adjacent the point 323 having a normal tendency to rise is prevented from doing so by the lid formed by the cooler drier fluid emanating from the cooling section 327. Therefore, a condition of imbalance is established or a non-stable turbulent mass of fluid is introduced into the tubular member 313 which creates a force for driving the inner member 315 (or 278) along.

From FIG. 14 of the drawings, it may be seen that at a predetermined distance downstream along the length of the tubular member 313 a second means 317 for introducing a non-stable turbulent mass of fluid is included, in other words, confining a tornado type situation within tube 313. Additional means 317 (not shown) may be included, depending upon the length of the tubular member 313. An object 329 may be placed adjacent the tubular member 313 and magnetically coupled to the inner member 315 and caused to move along adjacent the tubular member 313 in a manner similar to the previous embodiments. Thus, either the inner member of the outer member may be in the form of a magnet or both may be. It is anticipated that the object 329 might be a passenger conveying device, e.g., monorail structure or a vehicle similar to an automobile. Therefore, the object 329 may be moved from one city to another without conventional prime movers or the like.

The cooling section 327 includes a reduced diameter portion or venturi 331 which has a plurality of stublike tubular members. 333 communicated therewith as clearly shown in the drawings. Accordingly, the reduction in pressure through the cooling section 327 will cause the steam to lose moisture and the tubular members 333 will admit cooler dry air which is carried on into the tubular member 313. If desired, cooling sections 327 may be omitted without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

It shouldbe understood that the inner member 315 (or 278) may optionally be an electro-magnet without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. In other words, electrical structure well known to those skilled in the art could be installed within the tubular member 313 for keeping the inner members315 (or 278) energized as it travels along the length of the tubular member 313. It should be understood that the inner member 315 travels from right to left, as viewed in FIG. 14 of the drawings.

Although the invention has been described and illustrated with respect to preferred embodiments thereof, it is to be understood that it is not to be so limited since changes and modifications may be made therein which are within the full intended scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A conveying and force-producing means comprising tube means, at least one inner member movably mounted in said tube means, fluid means for causing fluid to be supplied to said tube means on one end of said inner member to move said inner member, at least one outer member disposed adjacent the exterior of said tube means at a location along the length thereof which is in the proximity of said inner member, magnetic means for magnetically coupling said outer member to said inner member to cause said outer member to move along with said inner member.

2. A conveying and force-producing means compris' ing tube means, an inner member slidably mounted in said tube means, fluid means for causing fluid to be supplied to said tube means on one end of said inner member to move said inner member, an outer member slidably mounted on the exterior of said tube means adjacent said inner member, magnetic means magnetically coupling said outer member to said inner member for moving said outer member.

3. The conveying and force-producing means of claim 1 in which said outer member includes magnet means, in which said inner member includes a magnetic substance, and in which said magnet means and said magnetic substance comprise said magnetic means.

4. The conveying and force-producing means of claim 1 in which said inner member includes magnet means, in which said outer member includes a magnetic substance, and in which said magnet means and said magnetic substance comprise said magnetic means.

5. The conveying and force-producing means of claim 2 in which said magnetic means includes an energized electro-magnetic means and in which is included means for de-energizing said electro-magnetic means.

6. The conveying and force-producing means of claim 1 in which said tube consists of a nonmagnetic substance.

7. The conveying and force-producing means of claim 1 in which is included means for introducing a non-stable turbulent mass of fluid into said tube means at least at one location along the length thereof to move said inner member.

8. A rotary force-producing assembly comprising at least one endless tube, at least one inner member movably mounted in said tube means, fluid means for causing fluid to be supplied to said tube means to move said inner member around said endless tube, at least one outer member disposed adjacent the exterior of said tube in proximity to said inner member, magnetic means for magnetically coupling said outer member to said inner member to cause said outer member to move along with said inner member.

9. A rotary force-producing assembly including at least one unit comprising an endless tube, a plurality of spaced apart inner members constituting a first set of members and being received within said endless tube, at least one inlet conduit and at least one outlet conduit respectively communicated with said tube, means for forcing a fluid into said inlet conduit, said fluid traveling through a portion of said endless tube and being exited through said outlet conduit to cause said first set of members to move along said endless tube, a journaled shaft, said endless tube being disposed circumjacent said shaft with the longitudinal axis of said endless tube being concentric to said shaft, a plurality of spaced apart outer members constituting a second set of members, said second set of members being fixedly attached to said shaft and being disposed adjacent the exterior of said tube at locations along the circumference thereof which respectively are in proximity to said first set of members, magnetic'means for magnetically coupling said first and second sets of members together to cause said second set of members to move along with said first set of members which impart a rotary force to said shaft.

10. The assembly of claim 9 in which is included means for interconnecting said first set of members one to the other to establish a fixed interval therebetween, said interval corresponding to the spaced apart distance of said second set of members.

11. The assembly of claim 9 in which said inner members are each spherically shaped, and in which inter-- connecting means is included for interconnecting said first set of members one to the other to establish a fixed interval therebetween, said interconnecting means including ring means respectively movably coupled to said inner members to permit rolling movement of said inner members.

12'. The assembly of claim'9 which includes means for coupling at least aplurality of said units one to the other, said plurality of units being arranged one behind another andbeing ganged to said, journaled shaft to increase the force produced therewith.

13. The assembly of claim 9 in which said first set of members includes magnet means, in which said second set of members includes a magnetic substance, and in which said magnet means and said magneticsubstance comprise said magnetic means respectively.

14. The assembly of claim 9 in which said second set of members includes magnet means, in whichsaid first set of members includes a magnetic substance, and in which said magnet means and said magnetic substance comprise said magnetic means respectively.

15. The assembly of claim 14 in which said first set of members respectively comprises non-magnetic cannisters for receiving granules of a magnetic substance.

16. The conveying and rotary force producing assembly of claim 9 in which said magnetic means includes of an energized electro-magnetic means and in which is included means for de-energizing said electromagnetic means.

17. The conveying and rotary force-producing assembly of claim 9 in which said inner members constitute elongated slugs having leading and trailing ends thereto, saidleading ends being convex-shaped and said trailing ends being concave shaped, said elongated slugs having inner and outer sides thereto with said inner side being directed towards said journaled shaft and said outer side being remote therefrom, said convex end of said slugs having a non-regular radius curvature thereto with the radius gradually increasing from a point adjacent the longitudinal centerline thereof towards said outer side and the radius curvature gradually decreasing from said point adjacent the longitudinal center-line towards said inner side;

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4222790 *Mar 23, 1979Sep 16, 1980Cities Service CompanyInorganic pigments, oxides of iron, zinc and/or magnesium
US4354125 *May 28, 1980Oct 12, 1982Kurt StollMagnetically coupled arrangement for a driving and a driven member
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DE102008048642A1 *Sep 24, 2008Apr 1, 2010WÜRZ, RaimundRotary piston engine, has two magnets, where one of magnets stays in operative connection with other magnet such that one of magnets works with other magnet during rotation of piston for driving motor shaft
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Classifications
U.S. Classification415/92, 415/202, 310/104, 417/410.1
International ClassificationF15B15/08, F01C1/00, H02K49/00, F15B15/00, H02K49/06, H02K49/10, F01B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationH02K49/10, F01B11/00, F01C1/00, H02K49/06, F15B15/086
European ClassificationF15B15/08C2, F01B11/00, H02K49/06, F01C1/00, H02K49/10