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Publication numberUS3847718 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1974
Filing dateNov 1, 1971
Priority dateNov 1, 1971
Also published asCA968001A1, DE2237583A1, DE2237583B2, DE2237583C3
Publication numberUS 3847718 A, US 3847718A, US-A-3847718, US3847718 A, US3847718A
InventorsWatson D
Original AssigneeXerox Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adhesive binding means for edge binding assembled pages together in book fashion
US 3847718 A
Abstract
A strip-like part or cover for edge binding assembled pages to form a book-like assembly, the part consisting of a substrate such as paper bearing three stripe-like formations of heat activated adhesive on one side thereof. The central adhesive stripe is substantially thicker than the other two stripes, and extends along the substrate axis with a width approximately equal to the overall thickness of the book to be bound. The remaining adhesive stripes, which flank the central stripe are preferably comprised of adhesive having a relatively high tack when heated while the adhesive comprising the center stripe has a relatively low tack when heated to facilitate application of the binding stripe. As an alternate, the flanking stripes may be comprised of a pressure sensitive adhesive.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

nited States Patent [19] Watson Nov. 12, 1974 [75] Inventor: Donald W. Watson, Arlington Heights, 111.

[73] Assignee: Xerox Corporation, Stamford,

Conn.

[22] Filed: Nov. 1, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 194,446

Semon 281/21 R Steidinger 281/21 R Primary Examiner-Philip Dier [57] ABSTRACT A strip-like part or cover for edge binding assembled pages to form a book-like assembly, the part consisting of a substrate such as paper bearing three stripelike formations of heat activated adhesive on one side thereof. The central adhesive stripe is substantially thicker than the other two stripes, and extends along the substrate axis with a width approximately equal to the overall thickness of the book to be bound. The re maining adhesive stripes, which flank the central stripe are preferably comprised of adhesive having a relatively high tack when heated while the adhesive comprising the center stripe has a relatively low tack when heated to facilitate application of the binding stripe. As an alternate, the flanking stripes may be comprised of a pressure sensitive adhesive.

14 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures Martin et al. 281/21 R Y PATENH 313V I 21974 SHED 2 (IF 2 ADHESIVE BINDING MEANS FOR EDGE BINDING ASSEMBLED PAGES TOGETHER IN BOOK FASHION This invention relates to means for adhesively binding pages together in book or pamphlet form, and more particularly, to an adhesive binding means utilizing variable tackiness adhesives.

It is often desirable to bind the pages of a report, or book, or the like together into a permanent assembly. While numerous arrangements for binding or assembling pages together are available, each with certain inherent advantages of its own, many of these known arrangements of the same time suffer certain disadvantages such as high cost, or the need for relatively complex applicator machinery, as to render their efficacy doubtful.

One well known arrangement for assembling pages together is stapling. However, the total number of pages that can be stapled together is limited; moreover, the resulting product may not have the desired permanency since the staple or staples may become unhinged, or with sustained use of the book or pamphlet, the pages may tear out or otherwise work loose.

Where the number of pages are too great for stapling, stitching may be resorted to. However, stitching requires relatively complex and expensive machinery which is normally found only in a book binding facility, not the typical office. In this latter case, metal clip or clamp assemblies may be resorted to. These, however, require some type of punching or drilling mechanism to provide holes in the paper for the clip prongs.

Another known binding arrangement employs ringlike pieces, which are normally plastic, having multiple prong ends which, in use, are inserted through aligned openings in the page edges and locked in place. This may be accomplished by forming the plastic with an inherent self-curl or through the use of a second locking member. Again, as with the metal clip or clamp system previously discussed, this arrangement requires that a series of holes be first formed through the assembled pages in order to receive the prongs, usually by means of a gang punch or drill. In addition, piece cost and storage problems may mitigate against the use of this system, the latter due to the need to provide a supply of different size binding piecesto cover various book thicknesses.

It is a principal object of this invention to provide a new and improved adhesive binding means.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a simplified low cost binding means for edge binding pages.

line thereof for bonding page edges together and to the strip, with relatively thin coverings of adhesive along each side of the thick adhesive for bonding the strip sides to the outermost pages of the material being bound.

It is an object of this invention to provide means for edge binding documents to form a pamphlet or book having one or more relatively thick heat activated adhesive stripes, the adhesive consisting of either high or low tack type adhesive, and adjoining therewith, a relatively thin covering of adhesive consisting of a high tack adhesive.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved binding strip incorporating divergent adhesrves.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved binding piece for use in binding pages together in book-like form having a length of relatively thick heat activated adhesive adapted to bond page edges, with flanking lengths of pressure sensitive adhesive to engage the sides of the book.

This invention relates to means to edge binding pages together in book-like fashion, comprising, a substrate of formable material, the substrate having a minimum width greater than the thickness of the book to be bound to permit the substrate to overlay not only the book end but also at least that portion of the outer pages of the book immediately adjoining the book end; a first relatively thick heat activated adhesive on one face of the substrate and substantially along the centerline thereof, the first adhesive being smaller than the substrate and arranged in a generally longitudinal stripe-like formation such that uncovered portions of the substrate project therebeyond at least along the sides of thefirst adhesive stripe; the first adhesive stripe being of a width sufficient to, accommodate the thickness of the pages to be bound; and a second relatively thin adhesive on the substrate material uncovered portions at least along each side of the first adhesive stripe whereby to form a pair of second stripe-like formations flanking the first adhesive stripe, the second adhesive consisting of a relatively high tack adhesive.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the ensuing description and drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view showing the binding means of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the binding means shown in FIG.[ taken alonglines 2- 2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of the binding means shown in FIG. 1 applied to a book;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view showing the binding means of the present invention in the form of a cover or case for books;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view showing the cover of FIG. 4 applied to a book;

FIG. 6 is an isometric view showing an alternate embodiment wherein adhesive segments are employed in place of a continuous adhesive stripe; and

FIG. 7 is an isometric view showing another embodiment. wherein both heat activated and pressure sensitive adhesives are used. 7

Referring to the drawings, numeral 10 designates generally the adhesive binding means of the present invention. In the exemplary arrangement shown, binding means 10 comprises a length or strip of formable backing or substrate material 12, normally comprised of relatively heavy paper stock bearing adhesive coatings. The overall length of the substrate 12 and hence binding means 10 is substantially-the same as that of the pages, i.e., book 15 to be bound. However, it is understood that binding means 10 may be indefinite in length in which case the binding means, which could be conveniently supplied in the form of a roll, would be cut to size at the time of use. Minimally, the width of the binding means substrate 12 is greater than the thickness of the book to allow the edge portions or flanks thereof to be secured onto the outer pages or covers of an assembled book 15 as seen in FIG. 3.

Where desired, the width of substrate 12 may be made sufficient to enable the substrate 12 to serve as a protective or decorative cover for the book 15. In this case, as may be seen from FIGS. 4 and 5, the overall width of substrate 12 forming the book cover 30 approximates or slightly exceeds the width of book 15. And, while paper has been suggested for the substrate material, other substrate materials, i.e., fabrics, mesh, metal, etc. may be used.

As will appear, the binding means substrate 12 carries stripe-like formations consisting of two heat activated adhesive types (FIGS. 1-6) or a combination of heat activated and pressure sensitive adhesives as shown in the FIG. 7 embodiment. The heat activated adhesives comprise materials adapted when heated to an activation temperature to become adhesive or tacky. On cooling after heating, they revert to a nontacky state, and if in contact with another surface prior to and during the cooling cycle, an adhesive bond will be achieved when cooling is completed.

Pressure sensitive adhesives comprise materials which are normally in an adhesive or tacky state at room or ambient temperatures and hence require no heating for activation. Normally, to prevent unwarranted or premature adhesion between pressure sensitive adhesives and other surfaces with which the adhesive might contact, a removable covering material is provided thereover.

Heat activated adhesives may be either low or high tack types. A low tack adhesive comprises an adhesive material which when heated becomes fairly molten or fluid thereby providing a high degree of surface wet-out with minimum application pressure or heat. A high tack adhesive comprises an adhesive material which when heated remains highly viscous and somewhat immobile so that a definite amount of application pressure and/or heat is necessary to wet-out the surface being adhered. Examples of low tack and and high tack adhesives are respectively disclosed in the US. Pat. No. to H. Post et al., 3,531,358, issued Sept. 29, 1970 and R. J. OBrien et al., 3,188,114, issued June 8, 1965.

High tack adhesive, in the pressure sensitive case, has the advantage that, on the application of pressure, the bond immediately possesses a high degree of strength. High tack adhesive, in the heat activated case, has the advantage that, on application of heat and pressure, the bond quickly possesses a high degree of strength.

According to the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. l-3, a relatively thick elongated stripe 14 comprised of low tack heat activated adhesive 13 is disposed on substrate 12 along the strip centerline. Normally, the width of adhesive stripe 14 is approximately equal to or slightly greater than the overall thickness of the book 15 with the result that substrate portions 18 extend along each side of stripe 14. It is understood, however, as will appear hereinafter, that the width of adhesive stripe 14 may be less than the thickness of the book 15 to be bound. The overall length of adhesive stripe 14 may be slightly less than that of substrate 12 to provide projecting substrate end portions 19.

Adhesive stripe 14 is suitably attached to substrate 12, for example, by localized heating of the adhesive at selected points 17 therealong. It is understood, however, that adhesive stripe 14 may be secured to the substrate 12 by other suitable means. In cases where the width of adhesive stripe 14 is less than the width of the book to be bound, the adjoining portions of substrate 12 accommodate spreading of the adhesive during the bonding process. In a similar manner, end portions 19 of substrate 12 accommodate any longitudinal spreading or flowing of the adhesive stripe 14 during the bonding process.

The strip-like portions 18 of substrate 12 remaining on either side of adhesive stripe 14 are covered with a relatively thin coating of high tack heat activated adhesive 21 forming in cooperation with center stripe 14 three parallel stripes of adhesive. Preferably and as will appear more fully herein, the end portions 19 of substrate 12 are covered with adhesive 21.

As noted, adhesive stripe 14 is relatively thick, a thickness of from 0.015 to 0.020 inches for example, having been found to be suitable. The second adhesive 21 on substrate areas 18, 19 is relatively thin, a thickness of 0.001 to 0.005 inches for example, having been found suitable.

With one adhesive formulation, the adhesive 15, which comprises stripe 14, has an activation temperature in the range of 350450F while the adhesive 21, which comprises side stripes 18, has an activation temperature in the range of 250350F. It is understood that other suitable adhesive formulations may have different reactive temperature ranges.

It will be appreciated that various length and width substrates having various width glue stripes 14 may be provided to enable different length pages and/or different thickness books 15 to be accommodated.

In use, a binding means 10 having an adhesive stripe 14 of suitable width and a length slightly less than that of book 15 is provided. Referring now particularly to FIG. 3, the loose pages comprising the book 15 are placed, edge first, on adhesive stripe 14. The substrate sides 18, which carry the adhesive 21 and project outwardly beyond the assembled pages, are turned upwardly to bring the adhesive 21 into contact with the outside pages or covers of the book 15. Heat and pressure may then be applied, either simultaneously or in stages, to the bottom and sides of the substate 12 to activate, i.e., melt the adhesives and bond the pages to one another and to the substrate 12.

Since the adhesive 21 consists of a high tack adhesive, a bond is normally relatively quickly obtained between the strip sides 18 and the adjoining outer pages of the book 15. This permits the source of heat and pressure for sides 18 to be removed at a relatively early stage and normally before completion of the binding cycle if desired. The establishment of a tight bond occasioned by the use of a high tack adhesive between the substrate sides 18 and the outer pages of book 15 assures that sides 18 will not unfold away from the outermost pages when the source of side heat and pressure is removed.

The application of heat and pressure to the base of substrate 12, following a relatively longer period, activates the adhesive 13 comprising strip 14, the relatively large quantity of adhesive flowing or wicking between the edges of the book pages and being absorbed intimately therewith to bond the pages together to one another and to substrate 12. Any excess quantity of adhesive 13 remains trapped between the substrate and the juncture of the substrate sides 18 with the outer pages of book 15. The end portions 19 of substrate 12 accommodate spreading of adhesive 13 in a longitudinal direction. In cases where the width of adhesive stripe 14 is less than that of book 15, the adhesive 13 spreads outwardly upon activation to the book edges to bond the book pages to one another and to substrate 12.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, where like numerals refer to like parts, the overall width of substrate 12 may be sufficient to enable the binding means to additionally serve as a cover for the book. In this arrangement, substrate 12 comprises a relatively large rectangular member 30 having a midportion 31 bearing the relatively thick stripe 14 of low tack adhesive 13 flanked by cover sections 32. Cover sections 32 are normally equal in size to or slightly larger than the width of the book pages while the width of stripe 14 is sufficient to accommodate the book width as described heretofore. The portions of cover sections 32 immediately adjoining stripe 14 are covered with a relatively thin coating of the high tack adhesive 21 to form flanking adhesive stripes 34, the width of stripes 34 normally being only sufficient to provide a suitable bond between the cover sections 32 and the outside pages of book 15. However, it is understood that the entire inside surface of cover sections 32 between the cover edges and center stripe 14 may be covered with the adhesive 21. As will be understood, the use or application of cover member 30 is the same as that described heretofore for the strip-like binding means 10.

Referring to FIG. 6, where like numerals refer to like parts, an alternate binding means 22 is there shown wherein the central adhesive stripe 14' comprises a series of spaced blocklike adhesive segments 26 of low tack adhesive 13. The areas 27 of substrate 12 therebetween carry a relatively thin coating of the high tack adhesive 21. Application of binding means 22 is as described in connection with binding means 10. In this case, on activation, the adhesive comprising segments 26 flows generally longitudinally along substrate 12 onto the substrate areas 27 to provide a continuous bond of the pages to one another and to substrate 12.

While a series of block-like adhesive segments 26 are illustrated, other configurations and designs for adhesive stripe 14 may be contemplated.

It is understood that the binding side of substrate 12 may be completely coated or covered with high tack adhesive 13 following which the low tack adhesive 13 either in the form of a continuous stripe 14 or segments 26 may be applied. Altemately, application of high tack adhesive 21 to end areas 19 of substrate 12 and/or the areas 27 between adhesive segments 26 (in the FIG. 6 embodiment) may be omitted. And while the adhesive forming stripe 14 or segments 26 have been described as consisting of a low tack adhesive, a high tack adhesive such as the adhesive 21 may be used instead.

Referring now to the arrangement shown in FIG. 7, where like numerals refer to like parts, the central stripe 14, which may comprise either low or high tack adhesive 13 is flanked by a suitable pressure sensitive adhesive 40. In order to prevent premature binding or sticking of the adhesive 40, removable cover strips 41 are provided therefor.

In use, cover strips 41 are removed to expose the adhesive 40 which, on application of pressure following insertion of the book therebetween as described earlier, bonds the sides of substrate 12 to the outer pages of the book 15. The application of heat and pressure to the center portion or base of substrate 12 activates the low tack adhesive comprising stripe 14 to complete the bond in the manner described heretofore.

While the invention has been described with reference to the structure disclosed, it is not confined to the details set forth; but is intended to cover such modifications or changes as may come within the scope of the following claims. i

What is claimed is:

1. Means for edge binding pages together in book fashion comprising:

' a substrate of formable material, said substrate having a minimum width greater than the thickness of the book to be bound to permit said substrate to overlay not only the book end but also at least that portion of the outer pages of said book immediately adjoining said book end;

a first relatively thick heat activated low tack adhesive on one face of said substrate and substantially along the centerline thereof, said first adhesive 7 being smaller in size than said substrate and arranged in a generally longitudinal stripe formation such that uncovered portions of said substrate project therebeyond at least along the sides of said first adhesive stripe;

said first adhesive stripe being of a width sufficient to accommodate the thickness of the pages to be bound; and

a second relatively thin adhesive onsaid substrate uncovered portions at least along each side of said first adhesive stripe whereby to form a pair of second adhesive stripe formations flanking said first adhesive stripe, said second adhesive consisting of a relatively high tack adhesive.

2. The binding means according to claim 1 in which said substrate material has a length substantially equal to the length of the pages to be. bound, the length of said first adhesive stripe being less than said substrate length whereby to provide open areas adjacent the ends of said first adhesive stripe into which said first adhesive may flow during binding.

3. The binding means according to claim 1 in which said first adhesive stripe is attached to said substrate material by said first adhesive.

4. The binding means according to claim 1 in which one face of said substrate material is entirely covered with said second adhesive, said first adhesive stripe being disposed thereover.

5. The binding means according to claim 1 in which said second adhesive comprises a heat activated adhesive.

6. The binding means according to claim 1 in which said second adhesive comprises a pressure sensitiveadhesive.

7. The binding means according to claim 1 in which the width of said first adhesive stripe is less than the thickness of the pages to be bound, said first adhesive stripe expanding out when activated to accommodate all of the pages being bound.

8. The binding means according to claim 6 in which the activating temperature for said high tack adhesive is less than the activating temperature for said low tack adhesive.

9. The binding means according to claim I in which said first adhesive stripe is comprised of a series of spaced adhesive segments.

10. The binding means according to claim 9 in which said second adhesive covers the areas of said substrate between said first adhesive segments.

11. The binding means according to claim 9 in which said adhesive segments are attached to said substrate material by said first adhesive.

12. The binding means according to claim 9 in which said substrate one face is entirely covered by said second adhesive, said adhesive segments being disposed thereover.

13. An adhesive binding piece for use in edge binding pages together to form a book-like assembly comprismg:

a strip of formable substrate material;

a relatively thick stripe of heat activated adhesive on said strip extending longitudinallythereof substantially along the strip centerline, said adhesive stripe being comprised of a relatively low tack adhesive; and

a relatively thin stripe of heat activated adhesive on said strip on each side of said relatively thick low tack adhesive stripe and in boundary relationship therewith, said relatively thin adhesive stripes being comprised of a relatively high tack adhesive adapted on use of said binding piece to provide a bond with the portions of said pages opposite thereto whereby to prevent unfolding of those portions of the strip sides which are turned up about the comer edges of the book.

14. The adhesive binding piece according to claim 13 in which the length of said relatively thick low tack adhesive stripe is less than the length of said strip whereby to provide open areas of said strip at each end thereof into which said relatively thick low tack adhesive may

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US2434502 *May 4, 1945Jan 13, 1948Colonial Press IncBook and the production thereof
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Referenced by
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US3995886 *Aug 14, 1975Dec 7, 1976General Binding CorporationHeat reactivatible adhesive book binding
US4129471 *May 13, 1976Dec 12, 1978Rome Industries, Inc.Bookbinding technique
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US4289330 *Oct 10, 1979Sep 15, 1981General Binding CorporationBookbinding system
US4371194 *Jun 24, 1980Feb 1, 1983General Binding CorporationUniversal binding for making variable sized books and reports
US4371195 *Jun 24, 1980Feb 1, 1983General Binding CorporationCover with adhesive bridges in scored areas
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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/55, 428/78, 281/21.1, 428/41.9
International ClassificationB42C9/02, B42C9/00, B42D1/00, B42D1/10, C09J7/02, B42D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42D3/002
European ClassificationB42D3/00B