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Publication numberUS3848529 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1974
Filing dateOct 24, 1972
Priority dateOct 24, 1972
Also published asDE2324462A1, DE2324462C2
Publication numberUS 3848529 A, US 3848529A, US-A-3848529, US3848529 A, US3848529A
InventorsGegenheimer H, Hancock G, Siebein W
Original AssigneeBaldwin Gegenheimer Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ink level control system
US 3848529 A
Abstract
The combination of an ink agitator and sensor means to provide an apparatus and system for distributing ink in an ink fountain and for continuously monitoring the level of ink within an ink fountain and for automatically supplying additional ink to the ink fountain when the level falls below a predetermined level and for preventing the supply of ink to the fountain when the level of ink is at a predetermined level.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 91 Gegenheimer et a1.

[ Nov. 19, 1974 1 1 INK LEVEL CONTROL SYSTEM [75] Inventors: Harold W. Gegenheimer, Darien;

Walter A. Siebein, Redding; George ,1. Hancock, Milford, all of Conn.

[73] Assignee: Baldwin-Gegenheimer Corporation, Stamford, Conn.

22 Filed: Oct. 24, 1972 [21] Appl. No.2 299,894

[52] U.S. Cl. 101/363 [51] Int. Cl B41127/08, B41f 31/06 [58] Field of Search 101/350, 351, 363, 364,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,399,688 5/1946 Metzner et al 101/364 2,941,467 6/1960 .lauch et al 101/366 3,025,793 3/1962 Vischulis 101/350 3,134,326 5/1964 Davis 101/366 3,172,779 3/1965 Warshaw et a1. 118/9 3,199,451 8/1965 Nitchie 101/366 3,292,534 12/1966 Maschinot 101/364 3,308,754 3/1967 Munn 101/366 X 3,373,052 3/1968 Rode 101/350 X 3,541,959 11/1970 Taffel 101/363 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,073,133 6/1967 Great Britain 101/364 Primary Examiner-J. Reed Fisher Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Morgan, Finnegan, Durham & Pine [5 7] ABSTRACT The combination of an ink agitator and sensor means to provide an apparatus and system for distributing ink in an ink fountain and for continuously monitoring the level of ink within an ink fountain and for automatically supplying additional ink to the ink fountain when the level falls below a predetermined level and for preventing the supply of ink to the fountain when the level of ink is at a predetermined level.

The invention includes paddle means adjacent the ink agitator which are contacted by the wave of ink caused by the ink agitator movement thereby monitoring the level of inkwithin the ink fountain.

The apparatus and system has two embodiments. In one embodiment, the supply of ink is immediately adjacent the ink fountain and, if desired, moves back and forth with the ink agitator to insure even distribution of the ink being supplied to the fountain. 1n the second embodiment, the ink supply is located at a remote location and feeds ink to the ink fountain via a pipe system.

' 5 Claims, 23 Drawing Figures PATENTEI', HUV I 91974 SHEET 01 OF H CONTROL PANEL I INK FROM SENSOR INK PUMP 5i if -H- INK AGITATOR 4 4 INK PADDLES TRIP swITcH '2 INK DISPENSER TROLLEY\RAIL I I 7 l INK SENSOR 14 CONTROL 2 T PANEL INK g I I3 INK AGITATOR PADDLES TRIP SW|TCH\ I2 o PATENTEL HOV I QIBN SHEEI 02 0F 11 PATENI um 1 91974 sum 05 or 11 .F'IGH.

PATENTEL RSV I 91574 sum 05 [1F 11 PATENTEL, ran-v 1 9mm SHEET 07 HF 11 Hen.

RE GAUGE PRESSU PRESSURE REGULATOR Pmsmww 3,848,529

sum 11 or 11 INK LEVEL CONTROL SYSTEM THE INVENTION This invention relates to a method and apparatus system for distributing ink in an ink fountain, for continuously monitoring the level of ink within the ink fountain of a printing press and for supplying ink to the ink fountain in frequent discrete quantities in the event that the level of ink falls below a predetermined level. The invention further includes means for preventing the supply of an excessive amount of ink to the ink fountain when the level of ink in the fountain is at a predetermined level.

Printing presses have ink fountains which contain ink which is removed from the fountain by the ink fountain roller of the press. The ink within these fountains can have varying colors and tends to be viscous and sticky. It is necessary from time to time to replenish or change the ink within the ink fountain. When done by hand, this is a time consuming, messy job. When done manually, the operator must make frequent checks on the level of the ink and if the ink level is found to be low, replenish the supply by hand. The ink containers may be of 5, 10, 25 pound sizes or as much as 55 gallon drums or larger tanks.

Removing ink from containers of this size is difficult and can lead to spilling of ink on component parts or even on the floor. It is generally done manually by the use of a large spatula. Furthermore, where the ink is hand fed to the ink fountain, it is frequently necessary to remove a skin which forms on the top of the ink container when the ink is not in constant use. The removal of this skin, which is essential, necessarily results in loss and wastage of the ink.

Moreover, when the ink level is determined by observation, precise control of the ink level is not maintainedI-Ience, an excessive amount of ink may be in the ink fountain at a time when it is necessary to change the ink by reason of the fact that a different color or type of ink is then needed for that particular press. The ink in the fountain must then be removed resulting in loss and spillage of the ink then being used.

In accordance with the present invention, the level of ink is continuously monitored so that a predetermined level of ink is maintained within the ink fountain. More particularly, in accordance with this invention, a minimum level of ink is maintained within the ink fountain at all times. In other words, fresh ink will not be supplied to the ink fountain unless the level of ink goes below a predetermined level. Thus, there is no danger that there will be an excess of ink within the container resulting in an accidental overflow of ink. Moreover, since a minimum level of ink is maintained within the ink fountain, the amount of ink to be removed when a change of ink is dictated is kept at a minimum thus reducing loss and waste of ink when a change of ink is required. Further by maintaining a constant level of ink in the fountain insures consistent feeding of ink to the ink rollers.

In accordance with this invention, means are provided whereby the fresh ink is fed to the ink fountain on a frequent basis in small measured quantities generally a few ounces at a time. By frequently feeding the ink from the ink container, the ink which is fed is maintained substantially uncontaminated in that lint does not contaminate the ink supply. Moreover, precise control is maintained over the level of ink within the ink fountain by reason of the fact that only a few ounces of ink are fed to the ink fountain at a time.

When the device is in operation, the ink supply means is actuated by the ink agitator so that ink can be fed to the ink fountain only when the ink agitator is in operation thus preventing accidential supply of ink to the ink fountain.

The present invention has several embodiments, one where the supply of ink is at a remote location and a second embodiment where the ink supply is located directly above the ink fountain. In this latter embodiment means are provided so that the ink supply can, if desired, move with the ink agitator back and forth along the length of the ink fountain. As the ink agitator moves back and forth through the ink fountain, it distributes the ink and creates a wave of ink which, as will be seen, is utilized to monitor the level of ink within the container.

In both embodiments of the invention, sensor means are provided which are activated by the wave of ink and which determines when the level of ink is below a predetermined level in which event ink is automatically fed to the ink fountains for a predetermined period of time.

The invention also includes sensor means activated by the ink wave which determines when the ink level in the ink fountain is above a predetermined level at which time the sensor will activate means to prevent additional inkfrom. being fed to the ink fountain and will activate a warning light, thus informing the operator that there is an excess of ink in the fountain.

As embodied herein, the sensor means in combination with the ink agitator maintains the ink level in the ink fountain at a minimum level and determines when the ink level in the ink fountain is above a predetermined level. More particularly, as embodied, the ink sensors comprise pivotally mounted levers or paddles extending into the ink fountain which are adapted to contact the wave of ink caused by the movement of the ink agitator. An ink agitator of the type used herein to continuously mix the ink is described in U.S. Pat. No. 2,849,952 issued to H. W. Gegenheimer on Sept. 2, 1958 and in U.S. Pat. No. 3,084,025 issued to H. W. Gegenheimer et al on Apr. 9, 1963.

As explained more fully hereinafter the ink agitator assembly as it reaches the end of its path of travel, arms an electrical circuit which will automatically cause ink to be fed to the ink fountain unless the ink level sensor means determines that there is sufficient ink in the fountain in which event the ink sensor means will disarm the electrical circuit thereby preventing ink from being fed to the ink fountain.

In one form of the invention which is applicable to large presses or for long runs of the same type of ink, the ink supply is located at a location remote from the ink fountain. In this embodiment, the electrical system and sensor cooperate to cause the feeding of ink to the ink fountain from the remote location.

In another embodiment of the invention particularly adapted for smaller presses or for a short run of a large press where the ink supply may comprise 5 to 10 pound cans of ink, the ink supply is located directly above the ink fountain. In this embodiment of the ink, the ink supply means is mounted so that it can, if desired, move along the length of the ink fountain while it is feeding ink into the ink fountain.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved device or system for maintaining the level of ink within an ink fountain at a minimum level.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved device for controlling the level of ink in an ink fountain wherein sensors are used for continuously monitoring the level of ink whereby when the level of ink falls below a predetermined level, ink will be automatically fed to the ink fountain for a predetermined period of time.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device which prevents the ink fountain from obtaining an excessive amount of ink.

A further object of this invention is to provide a device wherein ink may be periodically fed to an ink fountain from a remote location.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device wherein ink is supplied to an ink fountain from a supply of ink located directly above the ink fountain and wherein an ink agitator distributes such ink throughout the ink fountain.

Another object of this invention is to provide an ink level control system which is activated by and cooperates with an ink agitator within an ink fountain.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a device wherein ink is supplied to an ink fountain from a supply of ink located directly above the ink fountain and wherein, if desired, the ink supply moves along the length of the ink fountain with the ink agitated to distribute the ink evenly throughout the ink fountain.

Objects and advantages of the invention will be set forth in part hereinafter and in part will be obvious herefrom, or may be learned by practice with the invention, the same being realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations pointed out in the appended claims.

The invention consists in the novel parts, constructions, arrangements, combinations and improvements herein shown and described.

The accompanying drawings, referred to herein and constituting a part hereof, illustrate embodiments of the invention, and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

In the drawings reference characters are used throughout to designate the same elements:

FIG. I is a schematic showing of an embodiment of the invention where the supply of ink is remote from the ink fountain;

FIG. 2 is a schematic showing of another embodiment of the invention where the ink dispenser is located at the ink fountain;

FIG. 3 is a perspective showing of the FIG. 1 embodiment;

FIG. 4 is a perspective showing of the FIG. 2 embodiment;

FIG. 5 is a sectional elevation taken along line 5-5 of FIGS. 3 and 4;

FIG. 6 is a plan view with coverremoved taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary vertical elevational view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a vertical elevational view taken generally along line 8-8 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 9 is a plan view taken along the 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 9 in elevation taken along line 10-10 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 11 is a front view of the elements shown in F IG.

FIG. 12 is a view similar to FIG. 11 showing a modification thereof;

FIG. 13 is a vertical section taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 11;

FIG. 14 is a vertical section taken along line 14-14 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 15 is a front view of the control panel;

FIG. 16 is a side view of the control panel shown in FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a front view of the ink dispensor used with the FIG. 2 embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 18 is a side view of the ink dispensor shown in FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a block diagram of the control panel shown in FIGS. 15 and 16;

FIG. 20 is a circuit diagram of the FIG. 1 embodiment;

FIG. 21 is a partial circuit diagram used with the FIG. 2 embodiment;

FIG. 22 is a perspective view showing a preferred embodiment of one form of the invention;

FIG. 23 is a pespective view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22 in a different position.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown an ink fountain 2 having located therein the cone 4 of an ink agitator. The ink agitator assembly 6 driven by the continuous chain 8 moves back and forth along the length of the ink fountain 2 (see e.g., FIG. 4). As the ink agitator traverses the ink fountain, the cone 4 rotates about its longitudinal axis thus resulting in continuous mixing of the ink within the ink fountain. The construction and manner of operation of the ink agitator assembly can be the same, except as modified as described herein, as the ink agitator devices described in the aforesaid U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,849,952 and 3,084,025 either of which can be used in conjunction with the present invention. Reference is made to those patents for a complete description of the construction and manner of operation of the ink agitator device. The ink is removed from the ink fountain by the ink fountain roller 10 (FIG. 3) in the conventional manner also described in the aforesaid patents. As the cone rotates and moves longitudinally in the ink fountain it causes the formation of a wave W (see FIG. 8). The wave is utilized for monitoring the level of ink within the ink fountain as explained subsequently.

In accordance with this invention, means is provided for continuously monitoring the level of ink within the ink fountain and for permitting the feeding of additional ink to the ink fountain in the event that the level of ink in the ink fountain falls below a predetermined level.

As embodied herein the sensor means includes a sensor assembly 14. The ink sensor assembly 14 is mounted by means of bracket 16 to the beam 18 which extends longitudinally along the ink fountain 2 and is attached to the frame of the ink fountain or offset press in any convenient manner press (see FIG. 3). The ink sensor assembly includes two sensors which are in the form of paddles or levers l2 and 13. Paddle l2 constitutes means for sensing when the level of ink in the ink fountain has fallen below a predetermined level thus permitting the feeding of additional ink to the ink fountain. Adjacent to paddle 12 is another paddle 13. This paddle which is positioned a distance further from the bed of ink fountain 2 than is paddle 12 senses when the ink level is too high and triggers means whereby additional ink cannot be fed to the ink fountain. This paddle also causes a warning light to go on. These two paddles are mounted with respect to the ink sensor mechanism in an identical manner. Hence, a description of one will constitute a description of both.

In accordance with this invention means is provided whereby the ink sensing paddles can be adjustd with respect to the bed of the ink fountain so that different levels of ink may be maintained in the ink fountain as desired.

As embodied herein and shown in FIGS. 3, 4 and there is an adjusting knob attached to the threaded shaft 22. Located within the ink sensor mechanism is a threaded nut 24 which is in threaded engagement with the shaft 22. At the end opposite from the adjusting knob 20 is a bearing 26 which engages the end of shaft 22. When knob 20 is turned the entire ink sensor assembly will move with respect to the bracket 16 thus adjusting the position of paddle 12 with respect to the ink fountain.

In accordance with this invention means is provided whereby the sensing paddles move with respect to the ink sensing assembly when the wave of ink caused by the movement of the ink agitator reaches a predetermined height.

As embodied, the paddles 12 and 13 are pivotally mounted with respect to the ink sensor assembly. Turning to FIG. 11 there is shown the arrangement whereby the paddle 13 is pivotally mounted with respect to the ink sensor assembly 14. It will be understood that the paddle 12 is mounted in an identical fashion. As there shown sensor paddle 13 is attached to the bifurcated frame member 30 by means of the screw member 32. It will be understood that by loosening screw member 32 the paddle 13 can be removed for cleaning or disassembly of the ink sensor. The bifurcated frame member 30 has a bearing 33 at the end opposite from the paddle which serves as a pivot for the sensors 12, 13 (See FIG. 13). The sensor paddles are provided with contact members 36 in the form of the threaded shafts on the frame 30 which are adapted to engage the lever 38 of the high level sensor switch 40. Thus, if paddle 12 is moved sufficiently by the wave W of ink the sensor switch 40 will be activated to produce the result described hereafter.

Similarly, sufficient movement of the sensor paddle 12 will operate sensor switch 42 to produce a result described subsequently.

FIGS. l2 and 14 show a modification of FIGS. 11 and 13 wherein the sensor switches are located on the left hand rather than the right hand side of the ink level assembly. The arrangements are otherwise identical.

In accordance with this invention means is provided whereby the ink agitator must be in operation before any ink can be fed to the ink fountain.

Turning now to FIGS. 5 and 6, it will be noted that there is a lug 49 on the endless chain 8. The lug 49 serves the same purpose as it does in US. Pat. No. 2,849,952. In addition, however, lug 49 serves to activate the trip switch 52 which is mounted at one end of the ink fountain in any convenient manner, each time the lug 49 comes into contact with the trip switch 52. In effect each time the ink agitator reaches the end of the ink fountain where the trip switch 52 is located that switch will be activated which activates the circuit as described subsequently.

OPERATION A description of the overall operation of the device will now be set forth.

Reference is now made to the electrical circuit shown in FIG. 20. As embodied, the system is run at 1 15 volts 60 cycles.

The electrical system is activated when the normally open automatic off switch 50 is manually closed thus energizing the control panel circuit and lights L1 and L2. These lights inform the operator that the system is in operation. In series with the automatic off switch 50 is an impression switch 3 which is normally open. This switch can be an air pressure switch or a limit switch depending upon the particular press involved. The purpose of the impression switch is to de-energize the ink level control panel circuit when the printing press is not printing so that ink will not be fed when the press is not running. It is opened by means not shown in the event the press is not operating.

If an air pressure switch is used, air pressure of 15 pounds per square inch or more will open the switch and de-energize the circuit. The air pressure, by means not shown, also removes the printing cylinder from the printing position.

If a limit switch is used, it is mechanically switched by means not shown when the press stops printing to accomplish the same purpose described above. The details of the alternative operations of the impression switch have been omitted or not being essential to the understanding of the invention.

As described earlier, the trip switch 50 is actuated by the lug 49 each time the lug 49 comes into contact with the trip switch 52 which is located at one end of ink fountain 2. When the device starts operation, the circuit is in the condition shown in FIG. 20. When lug 49 contacts trip switch 52, the first time the trip switch moves to the right (FIG. 20) and relay R2 is activated and switches R2-1 and R-2-2 are closed from their normally open position. When the lug 49 disengages the trip switch 52, the switch 52 assumes the position of FIG. 20 thus activating relay R1 because switch R-2-2 is closed. Activation of relay R-1 causes switches R-l-l and R-1-2 to close in their other position. When the lug 49 contacts trip switch 52 again and moves it to the right (FIG. 20) and since R-l-2 is closed, the circuit to the feed timer is closed and switch 54 closes.

The details of feed timer construction are not shown because it is a commercial embodiment not forming a part of the present invention. The purpose of the timer is to control the length of time that ink can be fed to the press. The timer can be adjusted to permit ink feeding for a predetermined period of time, usually a matter of seconds. For larger presses the ink feed will probably be for a longer period of time than for a smaller press. As shown in FIGS. 15 and 16, the device can also be provided with a counter to record the number of times ink is fed to the ink fountain.

After the timer has run for the predetermined period of time, the feed timer switch 56 will be opened thus de-energizing relays R1 and R2.

The foregoing description assumes that the wave of ink caused by the movement of the agitator through the ink fountain is not sufficiently high to cause movement of the paddle 12 which would open sensor switch 42.

, be de-energized. In this event, the feed cycle is interrupted. In fact, any time sensor switch 42 is opened the relays R1 and R2 will be de-energized thus preventing flow of ink to the ink fountain.

On the other hand, if the ink level is below the predetermined level the sensor paddle 12 will not move and sensor swtich 42 will remain closed and the cycle repeats itself.

The high level paddle 13 can also cause de-energizing of relays R1 and R2, thus, preventing further ink feeding. The high level switch 40 is shown in its normal position in FIG. 20.

If, however, the level of ink in the ink fountain is high enough so that paddle 13 is moved, then the high level switch 40 will close to the lower contact in FIG. 20 thus energizing relay R3. When relay R3 is energized, switch R3-1 closes thus keeping relay R3 energized and normally closed switch R3-2 opens thus de-energizing relays R1 and R2 and preventing additional ink feed.

When relay R3 is activated, light L3 goes on thus warning the operator that there is an excess of ink in the ink fountain.

The foregoing description applies to both embodiments of the present invention.

As noted hereinafter, in one embodiment of the invention the ink supply is at a position remote from the ink fountain. This embodiment is shown in FIGS. 1, 3, 8 and 20.

In this embodiment, shown in FIG. 20, when the feed timer circuit is activated then the feed counter and ink feed valve are also activated. When the ink feed valve is closed, then a pump located at a remote location is actuated and ink is pumped through pipe 70 (FIG. 1). The counter which is conventional in construction simply keeps track of the number of times the ink feed valve has been activated. This gives the operator an idea of the amount of ink that has been removed from the ink supply container located in the remote location since the operator can calculate the number of times the ink feed valve has been operated and know the length of time that ink has been fed by reading the time set on the feed timer.

It should also be noted that in order to fill the ink fountain at the beginning of a run, for example, there is provided a manual feed switch which by-passes the remainder ofthe circuit except for the automatic on/off switch 50. By closing this circuit the ink feed valve will activate and cause ink to be fed to the ink fountain.

FIG. 2] illustrates the electrical circuit modifications for the embodiment where the ink supply means is located directly above the ink fountain. This embodiment is also shown in FIGS. 2, 4, 7, 17, 18 and 21.

In this embodiment, when the feed timer is activated an air valve 66 (FIG. 21) is activated for the period of time set on the timer and air is forced into cylinder 67 (FIG. 18) for that period of time. The activation of the air valve will cause the plunger 68 (FIGS. 17 and 18) to descend thus forcing ink from the ink container 70 into the ink fountain 2 for the period of time set on the timer. If desired, an empty can switch 78 (FIGS. 17 and 18) can be placed within the air cylinder to activate light 4 when the plunger has descended a predetermined amount thus indicating that the ink supply can, has been or is about to be emptied.

In accordance with this invention, means is provided whereby the ink supply means in this form of the invention can, if desired, move with the ink agitator to insure even distribution of the ink.

As embodied (FIGS. 4 and 17) there is a bracket which is attached to the ink agitator assembly 6 in any convenient manner. On the top of the bracket 80 is lug 82. The lug 82 is engaged by lugs 84 which pivot about pivot points 86 and are biased by springs 88 into engagement with the lug 82. In this way, the ink dispenser assembly is attached to the ink agitator. In order that the ink dispenser can move means is provided whereby the ink dispenser can move along the beam above in the ink fountain.

In this embodiment, the ink dispenser 71 is mounted on the track 18. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 7, there are a series of pairs of rollers 90, 92, 94 on the ink dispenser assembly which engaged the front, top and rear walls of the track respectively. By virtue of this arrangement the ink assembly moves along beam 18 as a result of the movement of ink agitator resulting in even distribution of the ink being fed to the ink fountain.

The entire ink dispenser assembly is pivotally mounted about rod so that the entire assembly can be pivoted out of the way of ink fountain in the event clean up is desired.

If the spring biased lugs 84 are not moved into engagement with the stationary lug 82, as shown in the drawing, the ink supply means will not move with the ink agitator as it traverses back and forth.

In this form of the invention, the ink agitator cone may, if desired, be removed so that while no ink agitation occurs, the ink is evenly distributed along the ink fountain.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is shown in FIGS. 22 and 23.

This embodiment is preferred in that it eliminates certain parts and provides a simpler construction which is likely to be trouble free and provide for ease of operation. In this preferred embodiment, the lug 49 on the chain is eliminated and is not necessary to the operation of the device. In place of lug 49 there is provided a bracket 69 which is attached in any convenient fashion to the ink agitator assembly 6. A convention trip switch 72 is attached at the one end of the path of travel of the ink agitator assembly. As shown in FIGS. 22 and 23, the bracket 69 will contact the trip switch producing the same results as described above.

The invention, in its broader aspects, is not limited to the specific mechanisms and devices shown and described but departures can be made therefrom within the scope of the accompanying claims without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

1. A mechanism for maintaining the level of ink in an ink fountain at a predetermined minimum level comprising:

a. an ink fountain containing a quantity of ink,

b. a fountain roller extending into said ink fountain and adapted to remove ink from said ink fountain in small amounts,

c. wave making means mounted adjacent to said ink and extending below the level of ink in said ink fountain,

d. means for moving said wave making means longitudinally along the length of said ink fountain to form a wave of ink which extends above the level of ink in said ink fountain, said wave making means including switch activating e. an ink supply means containing a supply of ink for feeding to said ink supply,

f. a control means operatively associated with said ink supply means, said control including means to permit ink feeding and means to prevent ink feedmg,

g. switch means operatively associated with said control means, saidswitch means being positioned to be activated by said switch activating means as said wave making means moves longitudinally of said ink' fountain and being adapted to cause ink feed,

h. ink sensor means mounted adjacent to said ink fountaimsaid ink sensor means including a first member which extends into said ink fountain to a position above the level of ink in said ink fountain,

i. said first member of said ink sensor means being operatively associated with said control means and said means for preventing ink feeding,

j. said control means being adapted to feed ink in small measured quantities to said ink fountain unless the wave of ink caused by said ink agitator is suffieiently high to activate said first ink sensor member to thereby prevent further ink feed.

2. A mechanism as described in claim 1 wherein said ink sensor means includes a second member which extends into said ink fountain to a position above the level of ink in said ink fountain and being operatively associated with said control means to prevent ink feed if the wave of ink in said ink fountain is above a predetermined height.

3. A mechanism as described in claim 1 wherein the supply of ink is located in a position remote from said ink fountain, there being conduit means between said supply of ink and said ink fountain.

4. A mechanism as described inclaim 1 wherein the said supply is connected to said wave making means and adapted to move therewith and is positioned above said ink fountain.

5. A mechanism as described in claim 1 wherein said wave making means comprises an ink agitator which turns about its own axis while it moves longitudinally of said ink fountain.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification101/363
International ClassificationB41F31/02, B41F31/04, B41F31/03
Cooperative ClassificationB41F31/04
European ClassificationB41F31/04