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Publication numberUS3849169 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1974
Filing dateApr 20, 1973
Priority dateNov 4, 1971
Also published asDE2253375A1, US3827994, US3852829
Publication numberUS 3849169 A, US 3849169A, US-A-3849169, US3849169 A, US3849169A
InventorsR Cicione, J Finn, E Najjar, J Ohlson, P Scanlon
Original AssigneeGrace W R & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for producing wrinkle free permanently pressed cellulosic textile materials
US 3849169 A
Abstract  available in
Images(32)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States atent 1191 Cicione et al.

[ Nov. 19, 1974 METHOD FOR PRODUCING WRINKLE FREE PERMANENTLY PRESSED CELLULOSIC TEXTILE MATERIALS [75] Inventors: Robert J. Cicione, Cranston, R.I.;

Edward G. Najjar, Lincoln, Mass; Patricia M. Scanion, Arlington, Mass; John L. Ohlson, Bedford, Mass; Joseph F. Finn, Hyde Park,

Mass.

[73] Assignee: W. R. Grace & Co., New York,

[22] Filed: Apr. 20, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 353,160

Related US. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 195,844, Nov. 4, 1971, Pat. No.

521 u.s.c1. ..ll7/143A, 8/184, 8/185, 117/139.4,117/155 L, 117/161 LN 51 1111.131 .0211] USS [58] Field of Search 117/155 L, 161 L, l6] LN, 117/143 A, 139.4; 260/294 R; 8/184, 185

Primary ExaminerMichael R. Lusignan Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Elton Fisher; Kenneth E. Prince [57] ABSTRACT A process useful for imparting abrasion resistance, resistance to frosting, wrinkle resistance, crease retention, wash-and-wear characteristics, durable press characteristics, and permanent press characteristics to cellulosie textile materials and to improve the wet strength, water absorption, and other properties of cellulosic paper. The process comprises; (a) impregnating the textile material or the paper with an aqueous aminoplast system comprising at least one aminoplast and atleast one member of a latter recited first group; and (b) curing the aminoplast on the cellulosic material by; (i) irradiation; or (ii) by heating in the presence of an acidic catalyst. The composition comprises an aqueous aminoplast system admixed with an effective amount of a member of a first group consisting of;

where; (a) x is 0 or 1; (b) R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms; (c) R is hydro gen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms; (d) R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms, or -SO{, R4 is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH; or C l-l (f) R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH; C l-l or -CH OH; and (g) A is a member selected from a second group consisting of; (i) NC H (ii) NC.,l-l O; and (iii) -NC H 12 Claims, N0 Drawings METHOD FOR PRODUCING WRINKLE FREE PERMANENTLY PRESSED CELLULOSIC TEXTILE MATERIALS This is a division of application Ser. No. 195,844 filed Nov. 4, 1971, now US. Pat. No. 3,827,994, patented Aug. 6, 1974.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention is in the field of cellulosic textile materials and cellulosic paper. More particularly, this invention is in the field of; (a) crease resistant, durable press, or permanent press cellulosic textiles; and (b) cellulosic paper with superior physical properties.

As directed to cellulosic textile materials, this invention is concerned with processes, compositions, and agents for treating cellulosic textile materials to render said materials crease resistant, to make them excellently adapted to receiving and retaining a permanent press, and excellently adapted for use as; (a) wash-andwear and permanent press clothing; and (b) crease resistant and permanent press sheets, pillow cases, curtains, and the like. Cellulosic textile materials which have been treated according to this invention have an excellent hand; they also have an abrasion resistance and a tear resistance superior to that of the same cellulosic textile material treated with an aminoplast creaseproofing agent that does not contain a member of the first group recited in the following Summary.

The aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent (ACA) of our invention comprises an aqueous solution or an aqueous suspension containing an aminoplast, an acidic catalyst (acidic curing catalyst) for curing the aminoplast, and an effective amount of the first group member recited in said Summary. Said ACA can also contain one or more other additives such as brighteners, softeners, wetting agents, chelating agents, and the like. Said ACA can be cured by heating or by irradiation.

Incorporating said first group member into an ACA causes clothing, sheets, curtains, and the like made from a cellulosic textile material which has been inpregnated with said ACA, dried, and cured to have a far better hand, a greater abrasion resistance, a greater crease recovery, a greater tensile strength, an excellent shrink resistance, and less frosting than clothing, sheets, curtains, and the like made from the same lot of cellulosic textile material treated with the ACA which has not had an effective amount of said first group member incorporated therein.

The aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) of our invention comprises an aqueous solution or aqueous suspension containing an aminoplast and an effective amount of the first group member recited in said Summary. Said AAC can also contain one or more other additives such as brighteners, softeners, wetting agents, chelating agents, and the like, but said AAC is substantially free of acidic curing catalyst (acidic catalyst). Said AAC can be cured by irradiation or by heating in the presence of an acidic catalyst (e.g., S HCl, HBr, or the like).

Incorporating said first group member into an AAC causes clothing, sheets, curtains, and the like made from a cellulosic textile material which has been impregnated with said AAC, dried, and cured to have a far better hand, a greater abrasion resistance, a better crease recovery, a greater tensile strength, an excellent shrink resistance, and less frosting than clothing, sheets, curtains, and the like made from the same lot of cellulosic textile material which has been treated with the AAC which has not had an effective amount of said first group member incorporated therein.

The reason for these unexpected beneficial results is not understood especially since Frick et al., Pat. No. 3,144,299 (8/1 16.3) teach that a finishing agent for cellulosic textile material must have 2 or more methylol groups per molecule and we have found that no member of said first group has more than one methylol group per molecule and many members of said first group do not contain a methylol group.

Prior art methods and prior art systems for treating cellulosic textile materials to make said materials crease resistant and to give them durable press and permanent press characteristics are well known to those skilled in the art. Among the many references which teach methods and systems useful for this purpose are the following US. Patents:

3,526,474 (Reeves et al., 8/1 16.3)

3,434,794 (Tover, 3/116.3)

2,974,432 (Warnock et al., 38/144) 3,533,728 (Shippee et al., 8/1 16.2)

3,181,927 (Roth et al., 8/116.3)

3,518,044 (Reinhardt et al., 8/129) 3,531,806 (Shore, 2/243) The use of aqueous aminoplast systems to improve the physical properties of paper is also well known to those skilled in the art. Where used to treat cellulosic paper, an ACA is often called an aqueous aminoplast paper treating agent a terminology which we have adopted and which we use in our claims. Where used to treat cellulosic paper an AAC is often called an aqueous aminoplast paper treating composition a terminology which we have adopted and which we use in our claims.

The ACA, AAC, aqueous aminoplast paper treating agent, and aqeuous aminoplast paper treating composition of this invention can contain up to about 50 percent or more of at least one water soluble non-aqueous solvent such as dioxane, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, propyl alcohol, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and the like.

The process, ACA, and AAC of our invention are useful for preparing permanent press, creaseproof, and wash-and-wear clothing and for preparing permanent press and creaseproof fabric for use in making articles such as pillow cases, bed sheets, tablecloths, drapes, window curtains, and the like.

This invention is also in the field of cellulosic paper and the treatment of said paper with aqueous aminoplast systems (which can contain up to about 50 percent or more of at least one non-aqueous solvent such as dioxane, methyl alcohol, dimethylformamide, dimethylsulfoxide, propyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, and the like) to improve the paper's properties especiallyits wet strength and water absorbence.

The treated paper is especially useful as paper toweling, wet strength wrapping paper, and the like.

Where using an aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) to treat paper, the composition is often called an aqueous aminoplast paper treating composition a teminology which we use in our claims.

Where using an aqueous aminoplast creaseproof agent (ACA) to treat paper, the agent is often called an SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In summary, this invention is directed to a composition of matter (an improved aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent (ACA) of our invention) prepared by admixing an aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent and an effective quantity of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

b. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

d. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms, or --SO e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH; or

f. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or -CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

the ACA containing an effective amount (for quantity) of aminoplast.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In preferred embodiments of the composition set forth in the above Summary:

1. x is 0; R is -CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is -SO;,";

R is H; and R is H or -CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is -CH R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

This invention is also directed to:

l. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 percent of the composition of the above Summary.

2. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 100 percent of the composition of the above Summary and then dried.

3. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 100 percent of the composition of the above Summary, dried, and then cured by; (a) heating; or (b) irradiating (e.g., with infrared, ultraviolet, gamma rays, X- rays, an electron beam, a neutron beam, or a proton beam).

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment A) this invention is directed to an improved aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) prepared by admixing an aqueous aminoplast solution which is substantially free of acidic catalyst and which can contain a wetting agent, a brightener, a softener, and a chelating agent; the brightener and/or softener can be substantially insoluble in water causing the solution" to actually be a dispersion with the aminoplast and first group member dissolved in the aqueous phase of the dispersion and an effective quantity of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

d. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms; or SO;,

e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, Cl-I CH OH; or

f. R,, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or -CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

(i) diff-dt ifl' N CH1; CHzCHg (ii) CH1CH2 O; and

CHz-CH1 (iii) Uni- HI CHr-CH:

the AAC containing an effective amount (or quantity) of aminoplast.

ln especially preferred embodiments of the composition set forth in Embodiment A, supra;

1.x is R, is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R, is -CH R is hydrogen; R is -SO;,';

R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is ---CH;,; R R and R are hydrogen and R is CH OH.

This invention is also directed to:

l. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about l0 100 percent of the composition of Embodiment A, supra.

2. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about l0 100 percent of the composition of Embodiment A, supra, and then dried.

3. A composition consisting of essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about l0 100 percent of the composition of Embodiment A, supra, dried, and then cured by; (a) irradiating (e.g., with infrared, ultraviolet, or high energy radiation such X-rays, gamma rays, an electron beam, a proton beam, or a neutron beam); or (b) by heating in the presence of an acid catalyst (e.g., HCl, HBr, S0 formic acid vapor, and the like).

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment B") this invention is directed to a composition prepared by impregnating a cellulosic textile material with an effective amount (e.g., preferably about 25 100 percent) of an aqueous solution of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

a. x is 0 or 1; b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l5 carbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l5 5 carbon atoms;

d. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms, or SO e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH; or

f. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

on CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

i) oat-cm N/ crn; cni-o t (ii) cm-on, -N O;

5 CH1CH1 (iii) CH -CH: 40 N CHz-CH1 of the aminoplast.

ln especially preferred embodiments of the composition set forth in Embodiment B, supra:

l. x is 0; R, is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is SO{;

R is H; and R is H or --CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is ---CH;,, R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

4. The composition is dried.

5. The dried composition (the composition of item 4, supra) is cured with formaldehyde (e.g., by heating in the presence of HCHO and an effective quantity ofa gaseous acidic catalyst (e.g., HCl, HBr Hl, S0 formic acid vapor, or the like) or by irradiating (e.g., with infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, gamma rays, an electron beam, a neutron beam, or a proton beam) in the presence of HCHO). The formaldehyde can be conveniently supplied by vaporizing formaldehyde from an aqeuous formaldehyde solution, by heating paraformaldehyde or by heating trioxane preferably in the presence of a catalyst such as BP or other cationic catalyst (Lewis acid).

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment C") this invention is directed to an improvementin a process for manufacturing a garment from a fabric prepared from a cellulosic textile material comprising impregnating the fabric with a heat curable aqueous aminoplast creaseproofmg agent (ACA), said heat curable aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent consisting essentially of: (a) water; (b) an aminoplast; and (c) an acidic catalyst. Said aminoplast creaseproofing agent (actually the aminoplast component of said agent) is also radiation curable (e.g., it can be cured by irradiation with gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, infra radiation, a neutron beam, a proton beam, or an electron beam). Curing said agent with radiation is fully equivalent to curing it with heat and is encompassed herein. Where curing by radiation, the presence of the acidic catalyst (acidic curing catalyst) does no harm but neither does it (the acidic curing catalyst) serve any useful purpose. Hence, said catalyst need not be present where curing by radiation. However, said catalyst is required where curing by heating. Curing by radiation in the presence or absence of said catalyst is fully equivalent to curing with heat in the presence of said catalyst.

The impregnated fabric is dried at a temperature below the curing temperature of the aminoplast component of the heat curable ACA and then cut to the size, shape and style of the desired garment. The cut fabric is sewed to provide garment seams, and finished to make a completed garmentpCreases are imparted into the completed garment consistent with the desired design and style thereof, and thereafter the impregnated, dried, completed, and creased garment is cured by radiation, or it is heated (e.g., to about 120 -205C. preferably about 150 200C.), to cure the aminoplast and insolubilizes it in situ so that the completed garment is pressfree and the imparted creases therein are unaffected after repeated washing of the garment, the improvement comprising incorporating into (i.e., admixing with) the heat curable aminoplast creaseproofing agent an effective amount (or quantity) of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

where;

a. .r is or 1;

b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 15 carbon atoms;

d. R is hydrogen. an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms, or -SO{;

e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms. -CH CH OH; or

f. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH;

or -CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

(i) CHr-CH:

-N CH:;

CH1C6I (ii) CHn-CH: -N O GHQ-CH2 and (iii) CH7- CH2 CHr-CHr the ACA containing an effective amount (quantity) of the aminoplast.

In the process of Embodiment C, supra:

1. x is O; R, is Cl-l and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is O; R, is -CH R is hydrogen; R is SO;,

R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R, is -CH;,, R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment D") this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for treating a cellulosic textile material with an aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) an aqueous aminoplast system which is substantially free of acidic curing catalyst and which can contain a softener, a brightener; a wetting agent, a chelating agent, and the like. The process comprises impregnating the cellulosic textile material with the AAC, drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material and curing the aminoplast thereon by maintaining the dried impregnated cellulosic material in the presence of a gaseous acidic catalyst such as a hydrogen halide, S0 or formic acid vapor at a temperature above about 25C. (preferably at about 50-65C. for about k to 60 minutes) or by irradiating the dried impregnated cellulosic textile material with infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, gamma rays, a proton beam, a neutron beam, or an electron beam; the improvement comprises incorporating into (i.e., admixing with) the AAC an effective amount (for an effective quantity) of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

a. x is 0 or 1; b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms,

(1. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms, or -SO,,';

e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, Cl-l CH OH; or

f. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group conthe AAC, after admixing with the first group member, containing an effective amount of the aminoplast.

(See US. Pat. No. 3,518,044, Reinhardt et al., 23/129 and US. Pat. No. 3,450,485, Reinhardt et a1., 8/1 16.3

1n the process of Embodiment D, supra:

1. x is R, is CH,,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R, is CH,,; R is hydrogen; R is SO R, is H; and R, is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R, is -CH R R and R, are hydrogen;

and R5 18 CH20H.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment E") this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for rendering a cellulosic textile material creaseproof by contacting said textile material with a gaseous aldehyde (e.g., formaldehyde, glyoxal, acrolein, and their homologs, see US. Pat. No. 3,528,762, Lauchener, 8/116) and a gaseous acidic catalyst, the improvement comprising impregnating said textile material with a sufficient quantity of an aqueous solution of a member selected from a later recited first group to provide an effective amount of the first group member before contacting the cellulosic textile material with the aldehyde and the gaseous acidic catalyst, the first group consisting of;

5 \ii lf/ \E R --(:)\CHg/x N\ and Br (I) \CIhI' A 0 R5 Ra H 10 where;

a. x is O or 1; b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms; c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

(1. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms, or SO{; e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH Ol-l; or

f. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

the aqueous solution of the first group member contains about 1 percent (preferably about 5 20 percent) of the first group member. The aqueous solution of the first group member can contain a wetting agent, a chelating agent, a brightener (i.e., a textile brightener or brightening agent) and a softener (i.e., a textile softener or softening agent). Since the brightener and/or softener can be only slightly soluble (or substantially insoluble) in water it is readily apparent that the aqueous solution of the first group member can actually be an aqueous dispersion of undissolved brightener or softener with the first group member dissolved in the aqueous phase. This process has also been used to improve the physical properties (especially wet strength and rate of water absorption) of cellulosic paper.

In other embodiments of the process set forth in Embodiment E, supra:

1. Said textile material is dried after being impregnated with said aqueous solution of said first group member and before being contacted with said gaseous aldehyde and said gaseous acidic catalyst (e.g., HCl. HBr, H1, S formic acid vapor, or the like).

2.x is 0; R is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

3. x is 0; R is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is SO R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

4. x is 0; R is CH R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is -CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment F") this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for treating a cellulosic textile material with an aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent (ACA) an aqueous aminoplast system which contains an effective amount of an acidic curing catalyst and which can contain a softener, a brightener, a wetting agent, a chelating agent, and the like. The process comprises impregnating the cellulosic textile material with the ACA, drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material and curing the aminoplast thereon by maintaining the dried impregnated cellulosic material at about 120 205C. (preferably about 150 200C.) for about 1 30 minutes (preferably about 2 minutes). 1f desired, vacuum can be used to accelerate the curing step, Alternatively, curing can be produced by irradiating the dried impregnated cellulosic textile material with infrared, ultraviolet. X-rays, gamma rays, a proton beam, or an electron beam. The improvement comprises incorporating into (i.e., admixing with) the ACA an effective amount (i.e., an effective quantity) of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

b. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

0. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

d. R;, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms, or SO c. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms. -CH CH OH; or

carbon atoms. CH CH OH;

or -CH OH; and

g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

the ACA, after admixing with the first group member, containing about 2 50 percent (preferably about 10 30 percent) aminoplast based on the total weight of the ACA (i.e., original ACA plus first group member plus any solvent (water or non-aqueous solvent which is soluble in water) added with the first group memher).

In the process of Embodiment F, supra:

1. x is 0; R is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is CH,; R is hydrogen; R is SO{;

R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is CH,,, R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment G") this invention is directed to an aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) which is prepared by a process comprising; (a) forming a first mixture by admixing an aminoplast precursor in an amount to provide an effective amount of aminoplast in the final composition, aqueous formaldehyde (the formaldehyde is generally added as an aqueous solution analyzing about 20 50 percent HCHO; additional water can be added if desired); and an effective amount (quantity) of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

vi. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or CH OH; and vii. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

CHPCH:

and

CHzC 2 CHrCHz the equivalent ratio of aminoplast precursor to formaldehyde being about l:l.l 2 (preferably about l:l.25 1.75) if desired the volume can be adjusted so that the AAC produced contains about 20 80 percent (preferably about 30 50 percent) aminoplast; (b) forming a second mixture by adjusting the pH of the first mixture to about 85-105 (the pH can be adjusted by addition of; (I) an alkali metal hydroxide; (2) barium hydroxide; (3) sodium carbonate and/or potassium carbonate; (4) sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate and/or potassium carbonate; or (5) potassium hydroxide and potassium carbonate and/or sodium carbonate, because of solubilities, neither barium hydroxide nor lithium hydroxide should be used where sodium carbonate and/or potassium carbonate are used); (c) forming a third mixture by maintaining the second mixture at about 40 90C. (preferably about 60 70C.) for about 30 240 minutes (preferably about 60 120 minutes); and (d) forming the AAC by adjusting the pH of the third mixture to about 6.5-7 (e.g., by adding an acid such as sulfuric acid, acetic acid, formic acid, hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, or the like). Typical of the aminoplast precursors which have been used with excellent results to prepare this composition include melamine, urea, ethylene urea, dihydroxyethyleneurea, propyleneurea, and mixtures of two or more such aminoplast precursors.

in preferred embodiments of the AAC set forth in Embodiment G, supra:'

1.x is R is CH and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is --SO';

R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. .r is 0; R, is -CH R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is -CH OH.

This invention is also directed to:

l. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 60 percent of the composition of Embodiment G, supra.

2. A composition consisting essentially ofa cellulosic textile material wetted with about l0 60 percent of the composition of Embodiment G, supra, and dried.

3. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 60 percent of the composition of Embodiment G, supra, dried, and cured, e.g., by radiation or by heating in the presence of a gaseous acidic curing catalyst such as S0 HCl, formic acid vapor, HBr, and the like.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment H) this invention is directed to an aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent (ACA) prepared by admixing the composition of Embodiment G, supra, and an effective quantity of an acidic quantity of an acidic curing catalyst.

In preferred embodiments of the ACA of Embodiment H, supra:

l. x is 0; R is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is SO R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is CH;,; R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is -CH OH.

This invention is also directed to:

l. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 60 percent of the ACA of Embodiment H, supra.

2. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 60 percent of the ACA of Embodiment H, supra, and dried.

3. A composition consisting essentially of a cellulosic textile material wetted with about 10 60 percent of the ACA of Embodiment H, supra, dried, and cured, e.g., by heating or by irradiating.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment I) the process of Embodiment D, supra, and the embodiments thereunder has been conducted with excellent results using the AAC of Embodiment G, supra, and the embodiments thereunder.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment J) the process of Embodiment C, supra, and the embodiments thereunder has been conducted with excellent results using the ACA of Embodiment H, supra, and the embodiments thereunder.

ln another preferred embodiment (Embodiment Ja") the process of Embodiment F, supra, and the embodiments thereunder has been conducted with excellent results using the ACA of Embodiment H, supra, and the embodiments thereunder.

We have found (Embodiment K) that the quality of paper (especially its wet strength, wet abrasion resistance, wet tensile strength, wet tear strength, and water absorption characteristics) can be greatly improved by impregnating the paper with an improved AAC of our invention, drying the impregnated paper, and curing the dried impregnated paper by irradiation or by heating. Where using an AAC for this purpose it is often called an aqueous aminoplast paper treating composition a terminology which we sometimes use.

We have also found (Embodiment L") that the quality of paper (especially its wet strength, abrasion resistance, wet tensile strength, and wet tear strength) can be greatly improved by impregnating the paper with an improved ACA of out invention, drying the impregnated paper and curing the dried impregnated paper by heating the improved ACA containing about 0.1 5% of an acidic catalyst. Where using an ACA for this purpose it is often called an aqueous aminoplast paper treating agent" a terminology which we often use.

We have also found (Embodiment M) that the general methods (or procedures) of Embodiment E,

supra, and the embodiments thereunder can be used to improve the physical property of paper (especially its wet strength, wet abrasion resistance, wet tensile strength, and wet tear strength). Paper treated with the improved AACs and ACAs of our invention is useful as paper toweling, high wet strength absorbtive paper, filter paper, and the like.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment N) this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for treating a cellulosic textile material with an aqueous aminoplast composition comprising impregnating the cellulosic textile material with the aqueous aminoplast composition and drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material, the improvement comprising incorporating into the aqueous aminoplast composition an effective amount of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

where:

a. x is or I;

b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl having about lcarbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl having about l-5 carbon atoms;

d. R is hydrogen, alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms, or --SO e. R, is hydrogen, alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, CH CH 0H; or

f. R; is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH;

or CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

(l) CHI-CHI -N CHfi n /CHr-Cl CHI-C and (ill) CH: CH:

CH: H:

in preferred embodiments of the process set forth in Embodiment N, supra:

l. x is 0; R is --CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen. 2. x is 0; R is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is SO R is H; and R is H or CH OH. 3. x is 0; R, is -CH R R and R, are hydrogen;

and R5 is --CHZOH. in another preferred embodiment (Embodiment 0) this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for treating a cellulose textile material with an aqueous aminoplast creaseproofmg agent, the process comprising impregnating the cellulosic textile material with the aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent and drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material, the improvement comprising admixing the aqueous aminoplast creasproofing agent with an effective amount of a member selected from a first group consisting of;

Ru 0 a, R," o R -J- CH, -N and Ri( J CH1 -ii!A 6 J) x R: H

where;

a. x is 0 or 1; b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l-S carbon atoms; 0. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms; (1. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l5 carbon atoms, -SO e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH; or

f. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or CH OH; and

g. A is a member selected from a second group con- In preferred embodiments of the process of Embodi-" ment 0, supra:

l. x is R, is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R, is CH R is hydrogen; R is SO;,";

R, is H; and R is CH OH.

3. x is 0; R, is CH,; R R and R, are hydrogen;

and R is --CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment P) this invention is directed to a process for treating a cellulosic textile material with a member ofa later recited first group to improve the physical properties of said cellulosic textile material comprising impregnating the cellulosic textile material with a sufficient quantity of an aqueous solution of a member selected from said first group to provide an effective amount of the first group member, said first group consisting of;

where;

a. x is O or 1;

b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms;

c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms;

d. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms, or SO';

e. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH; or

f. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group havingabout l-8 carbon atoms. CH CH OH;

or CH-,OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group conand drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material.

In preferred embodiments of the process of Embodiment P, supra:

l. x is O; R, is CH,,; and R R R.,, and R are hydrogen.

2. x is O; R, is CH;,; R is hydrogen; R is SO;,';

R is H; and R is H or -CH OH.

3. x is 0; R, is CH;,; R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment Q) this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for treating a cellulosic textile material with an aqueous aminoplast composition comprising impregnating the cellulosic textile material with an aqueous aminoplast composition and drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material, the improvement comprising; preparing the aqueous aminoplast composition by; (a) forming a first mixture by admixing an aminoplast precursor, aqueous formaldehyde, and an effective amount of a member selected from a group consisting of;

ii. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l5 carbon atoms;

iii. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

iv. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l5 carbon atoms, or SO v. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, --CH CH OH; or

vi. R is hydrogen, and alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or CH OH; and

vii. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

0112611, oif'r o'fi" N CH2; N /O;

CHrCH CHz-CHa and CH.' CH I CHf-CH:

the equivalent ratio of aminoplast precursor to formaldehyde being about 1:1.1 2; (b) forming a second mixture by adjusting the pH of the first mixture to about 85-105; (c) forming a third mixture by maintaining the second mixture at about 40 90C. for about 30 240 minutes; and (d) forming the aqueous aminoplast composition by adjusting the pH of the third mixture to about 6.5-7.

In preferred embodiments of the process of Embodiment Q, supra:

l. x is R is --CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is CH R is hydrogen; R is --SO R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is CH;,; R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment R) this invention is directed to an improvement in a process for treating a cellulosic textile material with an aminoplast creasproofing agent comprising impregnating the cellulosic textile material with an aqueous aminoplast creasproofing agent and drying the impregnated cellulosic textile material, the improvement comprising; preparing the aqueous aminoplast creasproofing agent by; (a) forming a first mixture by admixing an aminoplast precursor, aqueous formaldehyde, and an effective amount of a member selected from a group consisting of;

ii. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms;

iii. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about [-5 carbon atoms;

iv. R is hydrogen. an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms, or -SO{;

v. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about l-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH; or

vi. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, -CH CH OH;

or -CH- OH; and vii. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

CHs-CII:

O CHa-CH:

and

our-on:

the equivalent ratio of aminoplast precursor to formaldehyde being about 1:1.1 2; (b) forming a second mixture by adjusting the pH of the first mixture to about -105; (c) forming a third mixture by maintaining the second mixture at about 40-90C. for about 30 240 minutes; (d) forming the aqueous aminoplast composition by adjusting the pH of the third mixture to about 6.5-7, and (e) admixing the aqueous aminoplast composition with an effective amount of an acidic curing catalyst.

In preferred embodiments of the process of Embodiment R, supra:

1. x is 0; R is CH and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R is --CH;;; R is hydrogen; R is -SO R is H; and R is H or CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is --CH;,; R R and R are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment S") this invention is directed to a process for treating cellulosic paper with a member of a later recited first group to improve the physical properties of the cellulosic paper comprising; impregnating the cellulosic paper with a sufficient quantity of an aqueous solution of a member selected from a later recited first group to provide an effective amount of the first group member, said first group consisting of;

la (E /R4 152 f E R1 ATCHQ/x N\R and R; J) \CHII A where;

a. x is 0 or 1; b. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms; c. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms; d. R, is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-5 carbon atoms, or SO{; e. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH; or

f. R is hydrogen, an alkyl group having about 1-8 carbon atoms, CH CH OH;

or -CH OH; and g. A is a member selected from a second group consisting of;

am de; I -N\ CHa-CH:

(iii) and drying the impregnated cellulosic paper.

In preferred embodiments of the process of Embodiment S, supra:

l. x is R is CH;,; and R R R and R are hydrogen.

2. x is 0; R, is -Cl-I R is hydrogen; R is -SO{;

R, is H; and R is H or --CH OH.

3. x is 0; R is Cl-I R R and R, are hydrogen;

and R is CH OH.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment T") this invention is directed to an aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) prepared by a process comprising; (a) forming a first mixture by admixing an aminoplast precursor, water, ammonia, and an effective amount of a compound having the formula where;

i. .r is 0 or l; ii. R, is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l5 carbon atoms; iii. R is hydrogen or an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms; iv. R is an alkyl group having about l-5 carbon atoms, the mole ratio of said compound to ammonia being about 1:1 (preferably about 1:2 5); (b) forming a second mixture by maintaining the first mixture at about 100C. preferably about 4 6 hours); (c) forming a third mixture by removing (e.g.) stripping or evaporating) unreacted ammonia from the second mixture (e.g., by boiling; or by the application of heat and reduced pressure to induce vigorous boiling; or by the application of heat while purging with an inert gas (e.g., nitrogen. argon, helium, or the like) introduced into the second mixture via a sparger); (d) forming a fourth mixture by admixing aqueous formaldehyde with the third mixture, the equivalent ratio of aminoplast precursor to formaldehyde in the fourth mixture being about l:l.l 2 (preferably) about l:l.25 l.75); (e) forming a fifth mixture by adjusting the pH of the fourth mixture to about 8.5l0.5; (f) forming a sixth mixture by maintaining the fifth mixture at about -l90C., preferably about 90180C., (e.g., in a closed (pressurized) reaction zone) for about 0.25-4 hours (preferably about 1.5-3 hours); and (g) forming the aqueous aminoplast composition by adjusting th pH of the sixth mixture to about 6.5-7.

In another preferred embodiment this invention is directed to the AAC of Embodiment T, supra, in which x is O; R, and R are -CH and R is hydrogen.

In another preferred embodiment (Embodiment U") this invention is directed to an aqueous aminoplast creaseproofmg agent (ACA) prepared by admixing the composition (AAC) of Embodiment T, supra, and an effective amount (or quantity) of an acidic curing catalyst.

In another preferred embodiment this invention is directed to the ACA of Embodiment U, supra, in which x is 0; R, and R are -CH and R is hydrogen.

The AAC of Embodiment T (and the preferred embodiment thereunder) has been used with excellent results in the process of Embodiments I, Q, and K.

The ACA of Embodiment U (and the preferred embodiment thereunder) has been used with excellent results in the process of Embodiments J, Ja, R, and K.

Where an AAC is used to treat cellulosic paper it (the AAC) has been called an Aqueous Aminoplast Paper Treating Composition, and where an ACA is used to treat cellulosic paper it (the ACA) has been called an Aqueous Aminoplast Paper Treating Agent.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION There is an ever increasing demand for easy care, permanent press, creaseproof, and durable press garments and fabrics, that is, for garments and fabrics which have creases and pleats durably pressed into them and which remain substantially wrinkle-free in normal wear or use and which can be used after washing without requiring much, if any, repressing. These include the so-called wash-and-wear garments. As is well known, such durable press and permanent press garments and fabrics can be obtained by applying to and curing on the textile material one or more of a wide variety of heat curable aminoplasts (also known as curable durable press textile resins (US. Pat. No. 3,527,558, Tomasino et al., 8/l 16.2)). These are aminoplasts which can be cured on the fabric by impregnating the fabric with an aqueous solution of the aminoplast, said solution also containing an acidic catalyst such as zinc nitrate, magnesium chloride, or the like, drying, and heating, or irradiating (e.g., exposure to radiation such as infrared, ultraviolet, X-rays, gamma rays, an electron beam, a proton beam, or a neutron beam), or by the application of vacuum plus heat. Where using vacuum and heat the temperature is just sufficient to cure the aminoplast after volatile materials (e.g., H 0 and HCHO) are removed.

In one embodiment which is called precuring the drying and curing step is conducted as a continuous operation having the temperature in the drying stage below the curing temperature of the aminoplast. The drying stage is followed by a curing stage in which the dry impregnated fabric is heated to a temperature at which the aminoplast is cured, or the drying stage can be followed by irradiation Aminoplasts (curable durable press and permanent press textile resins) excellently adapted for use in aminoplast creasproofing agents and the preparation and use of these creasproofmg agents is well known to those skilled in the art. An aminoplast is generally applied to cellulosic textile materials as an aqueous aminoplast creasproofing agent (ACA) comprising an aqueous solution or suspension. The aminoplast per se and the acidic catalyst component of the aminoplast creaseproofing agent are generally soluble in water but the ACA can also contain wetting agents, softeners, brighteners, chelating agents, and the like, some of which can be only slightly soluble (or substantially insoluble) in water resulting in the presence of an insoluble phase being present in the ACA. In other words, the ACA is a dispersion when an insoluble phase is present.

In general, the ACA is applied to a cellulosic textile material and dried (by the application of heat (maintaining the temperature below the curing temperature) and/or vacuum) to about the normal moisture content of the textile material under ordinary room conditions (e.g., ca. l30C., and ca. -90 percent relative humidity). The thus dried textile material is then processed; (a) if the cellulosic textile material is fiber, it is spun and woven or formed into cloth or fabric, or formed into a non-woven cellulose containing fabric like material, pressed, and cured before or after being woven into thread or before or after being formed into cloth, fabric, or non-woven cellulosic-containing fabric like material. Alternatively, the dried fiber can be formed into a non-woven fabric and cured before or after being processed into a garment, sheet, tablecloth, or the like; (b) if thread, it is woven or formed into cloth or fabric, pressed and cured before or after being processed into a garment; and (c) if cloth or fabric, it can be (i) pressed free of wrinkles and cured; or (ii) processed into an article of clothing, pressed, and cured. Subsequent to curing the cloth or garment can be washed to remove any uncured aminoplast remaining thereon and other components of the aminoplast creasproofing agent (e.g., catalyst) which are removable by washing. Alternatively, a garment can be impregnated with an aminoplast creaseproofing agent, dried, pressed, and cured.

We generally prefer to bleach and scour a cellulosic textile material before treating it with the ACA or ACC to which we have added a member of the first group of the above Summary.

Typical aminoplasts which are used in aminoplast creaseproofing agents and/or typical acidic catalysts which are used in aminoplast creaseproofing agents to catalyze the curing of the aminoplast component of such agents, and typical methods of using aminoplast creaseproofing agents are taught by the following U.S. Patents which are incorporated herein by reference:

2,974,432 (Warnock et al.. 38/l44) 3,138,802 (Getchell, 2/243) 2,357,273 (Thurston, 260/29) 3,181,927 (Roth et al., 8/l l6.3)

2,887,409 (van Loo, ll7/l39.4)

3,450,485 (Reinhardt et al., 8/1 16.3)

3,|44,299 (Frick et al., 8/l l6.3)

3,39l,l8l (Scheurel, 260/482) 3,527,558 (Tomassino et 21]., 8/l l6.2)

3,531,806 (Shore, 2/243).

Preferred aminoplasts include diand poly-N- methyol, N-methoxymethyl, and N-lower alkoxymethyl derivatives of urea, cyclic ethylene urea, alkyltriazones, cyclic propylene urea, 4,5-dihydroxy cyclic ethylene urea, dimethylol alkyl carbamates, triazines, uron, and thiourea. Preferred aminoplast also include dimethylol propylene urea; dimethylol ethylene urea; polymethylol melamine; formaldehyde-imidazolidinone adducts; mixtures of dimethylol imidazolidinone-Z and its water-soluble ethers; methylol derivatives of 4,5- dihydroxyimidazolidone, l,3-dimethyl-4,5-dihydroxy- Z-imidazolidinone, and alkyl substituted 4,5-dihydroxy- Z-imidazolidinones; reaction product of dimethylol dihydroxyethylene urea and p-dioxane; 1,3-dimethylol- 4,5-bis(alkoxy)-2-imidazolidinones; 1,3- bis(hydroxymethyl)-2-imidazolidone; imidazolidinoneaminoplast blends; reaction products of urea, glyoxal and formaldehyde; polyalkylated monoureins; alkylated upon resin admixed with melamine formaldehyde compositions; N,N'-dimethyloluron dialkyl ether and urea-formaldehyde compositions; alkylated uron resin and triazone compositions; amine-modified uron resins; N,N'-bis(acyloxymethyl) urons; N,N'-bis(methoxymethyl) uron-formaldehyde addition products; N,N'-bis(methoxymethyl) uron-formaldehyde addition and reaction products; urea-formaldehyde condensation products; dicyandiamide-urea-formaldehyde agents; combination of monomeric and polymeric urea-formaldehyde condensates; 2-hydroxyethylamineurea-formaldehyde condensation products; amine modified cyclic urea resins; polymethylol ureas having a high formaldehydezurea ratio, aminoethanol-ureaformaldehyde reaction product; highly alkylolated nitrogen compounds; and diketone dialdehyde-cyclic amide condensation products.

Aminoplast precursors are well known to those skilled in the art. Said precursors are amine type compounds (including amides) which can be reacted with formaldehyde in basic or slightly acidic systems to form a material which forms an aqueous aminoplast composition when the pH is adjusted to about neutral (e.g., to about 6.5-7). Among the many aminoplast precursors which have been used with excellent results are urea, biuret, melamine, and other triazines, ethylene urea, propylene urea, alkyl carbonates, thiourea, 4,5- dihydroxyimidazolidone, l,3-dimethyl-4,5-dihydroxy- Z-imidazolidone; alkyl substituted 4,5-dihydroxy-2- imidazolidinones; alkyl carbanates; triazine resins; and the like.

Preferred acidic curing catalysts include zirconium acetate, aluminum acetate, lead acetate, manganese acetate, cupric acetate, zinc acetate, zinc nitrate, magnesium chloride, mixtures of zine and aluminum nitrates, zinc fluoborate, zinc perchlorate, zinc chloride, magnesium chloride, mixtures of magnesium chloride and formic acid, mixtures of magnesium chloride and citric acid, sulfonic acid salts of ammonia, phosphoric acid salts of ammonia, volatile (e.g., gaseous) acids such as HCl, HBr, S0 and the like.

In another embodiment which is fully equivalent, an aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC), which can contain a brightener, a softener, a wetting agent, a chelating agent, and the like), is prepared, but the acidic catalyst is omitted where preparing the AAC. Where using the AAC, a cellulosic textile material is impregnated with the AAC, dried, and cured by heating to the aminoplasts curing temperature in the presence of an acidic gas such as HCl, HBr, S0 or the like. Alternatively, the dried impregnated cellulosic textile material can be irradiated (e.g., with infrared, ultraviolet, X- rays, gamma rays, an electron beam, and the like) to cure the aminoplast. Excellent results have been obtained where an effective quantity of one of more of the aforesaid first group members was incorporated into the aqueous aminoplast composition before impregnating the cellulosic textile material with the aqueous aminoplast composition.

While the concentration of aminoplast and acidic catalyst in an ACA and the concentration of aminoplast in an AAC used in this invention are not critical, we generally prefer the aminoplast creaseproofing agent (solution or dispersion) as applied to cellulosic textile material (i.e., the aminoplast plus water (and any water soluble solvent) plus first group member, plus (in the instant of an ACA) acidic curing catalyst, plus brighteners, softeners, chelating agents, and the like) to contain about 2.5-50 percent or higher (or about -30 percent) of said aminoplast and (in the instance of an ACA) about 0.25-l0 percent (or about 0.5-6 percent) of said acidic catalyst (acidic curing catalyst). As noted supra, the acidic catalyst can be omitted, thereby to form an aqueous aminoplast composition (AAC) rather than the ACA. The aminoplast of the aqueous aminoplast composition is cured by; (a) irradiating; or (b) heating in the presence of an acidic gas. An effective amount of aminoplast must be present in any ACA or AAC and an effective amount of acidic catalyst must be present in any ACA.

Typical of the wetting agents which can be used with excellent results are sodium lauryl sulfate, dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate, sodium lauroyl sarcosinate, alkyl phenolpolyoxyethylene glycols, sodium or potassium salts of high molecular weight alkyl sulfates, sodium or potassium salts of high molecular weight alkyl sulfonates, and the like.

Typical chelating agents which can be used with excellent results are sodium or potassium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, sodium or potassium nitrilotriacetate, sodium B-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetate, and the like.

Typical of the brighteners which can be used with excellent results are bistriazinyl derivatives of 4,4 diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, naphthotriazolylstilbene sulfonic acid derivatives, and the like.

Typical of the additives and softening agents which can be used with excellent results are polyethylene emulsions, acrylic emulsions, silicones, wax emulsions, fluorocarbons, and chromium salts of higher fatty acids, sulfonated oils, sulfated fatty alcohols, quaternary ammonium salts, and the like.

The quantities of wetting agent, brightener, softener, and chelating agent are not critical to the instant invention; however, for economic reasons where one or more of these is used each is generally present in an effective amount.

We can prepare the improved ACA described in our above Summary by admixing an effective quantity of a member of the aforesaid first group (the first group of the above Summary) and an ACA solution or dispersion. Where the first group member is a methylol compound having the formula d A CHzOH ((ompouml A) with aqueous formaldehyde in the presence of a base (e.g., Ba(OH) and adding the resulting methylol compound to the ACA. Alternatively, methylol compound can be formed in situ by adding the Compound A to an ACA or to an AAC which contains excess HCHO. If the Compound A is added to an AAC the pH of the AAC should preferably be above 7 and preferably about 8.5-9.5; where forming the methylol compound in the AAC. (However, an acidic pH (e.g., generally about 5.0-6.9 or 5.5-6.5) is used where the aminoplast is dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneurea). Subsequent to forming the methylol compound in situ in an AAC containing excess formaldehyde, we can adjust the pH to about 6.5-7 (if pH adjustment is required) and add an acidic catalyst to convert the AAC to an ACA. Said ACA will, when formed, contain a methylol compound derived from Compound A.

We prepare the improved AAC of our Embodiment A, supra by admixing an effective quantity of a member selected from the first group recited in said Embodiment A and an AAC solution or dispersion. Where the first group member is a methylol compound having the formula (where x, R R R and R are as recited in said Embodiment A) we can prepare said methylol compound by reacting the above described Compound A with aqueous formaldehyde in the presence of a base and add the resulting methylol compound to the AAC. Alternatively, the methylol compound can be formed in situ by adding Compound A to an AAC which contains an excess of formaldehyde, thereby forming the composition recited in Embodiment A wherein the first group member is a methylol compound recited in said first group.

We have found that the concentration of first group member present in the ACAs of our invention or the AACs of our invention can be varied over wide limits and still produce excellent and effective results. However, we generally prefer that the concentration of said first group member be about 0.5-35 percent (or about 2-10 percent) based on the weight of the resulting composition (the ACA or AAC as applied to a cellulosic textile material, i.e., the ACA or AAC plus, said first group member (the first group of the Summary or Embodiment H in the instance of an ACA and the first group of Embodiments A or G in the instance of an AAC) plus any water (and other solvent) added with said first group member).

Excellent results have been obtained where said compositions contain concentration of said first group member much higher than about 35 percent, but no technical advantage is obtained by using first group member concentrations greater than about 25 percent. and the use of first group member concentrations higher than about 25 percent is economically unattractive. Said compositions in which the concentration of the first group member is significantly lower than the aforesaid about 0.5 percent produce beneficial results, but the hand, abrasion resistance, tensile strength, tear resistance, and shrinkage obtained at these low first group members concentrations are, in some instance, somewhat less desirable than where the first group members concentration is about 0.5 percent or higher. Because of our disclosure one skilled in the art can readily determine the concentration of said first group member which will give optimum results in a given ACA or AAC where said ACA or AAC is used for a particular purpose with a specific cellulosic textile material (e.g., to prepare wash-ancl-wear or permanent press shirts from cotton cloth or from a blend of cotton and polyester).

N-methylollactamide,

is a well known compound having been prepared by Einhorn et al (Ann. l908, 361, 113; Bcilstein, l92l, II], 283; C.A. 1908, 2, 2682) by reacting lactamide and formaldehyde solution in the presence of baryta (Ba- (OH) The other N-methylol compounds recited in the first group of our above Summary and our above Preferred Embodiments can be prepared by the general method of Einhorn et al wherein lactamide is replaced by the appropriate amide having a hydrogen on the amide nitrogen. We prefer to prepare lactamide for use in our invention by the general procedure set forth infra.

We have found that incorporating one or more of our first group members into an ACA or AAC does not require any substantial change in the apparatus, or method, or conditions (temperature, time, and the like) used to apply the ACA or AAC to a cellulosic textile material and to dry and cure the aminoplast component of the ACA or AAC where said ACA or AAC is applied to said textile material (or to cellulosic paper). In other words, the same general apparatus, method, and conditions used to apply a given ACA or AAC to a given cellulosic textile material (or to cellulosic paper) and to cure the aminoplast component of said ACA or AAC on said textile material (or paper) can be used to apply, dry. and cure said ACA or AAC after an effective amount of one ore more of our first group members has been admixed with said ACA or AAC (to make the ACA or AAC an improved ACA or AAC of our invention).

As is well known to those skilled in the art some aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agents (ACAs) require the addition of an acid such as acetic acid, sulfuric acid, formic acid, phosphoric acid, or the like to reduce the pH of the ACA before the ACA can be cured by the application of heat or heat and vacuum. Where using such an ACA in our invention, we add thereto a quantity of acid effective to render the ACA heat curable. This technique is well known in the prior art, and

incorporating additives such as those of the above Summary or the above Embodiment l-l into an ACA does not significantly change the technique.

Claims directed to compositions and processes of the instant invention recite an effective amount (or an effective quantity) of a member of a first group (e.g., the first group of the above Summary or the first group of Embodiment A, B, C, D, E, F, G, or H); however, because of our disclosure, it is readily apparent to those skilled in the art that an effective amount of first group members can be obtained by admixing two or more of the members of said first group even though the amount of any one individual group member in the resulting mixture is not sufficient if taken alone to constitute an effective amount.

More than an effective amount of said group member (or a combination of more than one member of said group to total more than an effective amount) can be present in the compositions or processes of this invention, but, in general, little or no advantage is gained by using more than an effective amount, and cost of said group member (or members) tends to render the use of more than at least about an effective amount economically unattractive.

Claims directed to the compositions and processes of the instant invention recite an aqueous aminoplast composition," an aqueous aminoplast creaseproofing agent," an aqueous aminoplast paper treating composition, or an aqueous aminoplast paper treating agent; however, it will, because of our disclosure, be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that each of the aqueous aminoplast compositions or aqueous aminoplast agents can; (a) contain at least one aminoplast (i.e., each aqueous aminoplast composition or agent can contain 1, or 2, or more aminoplast); and (b) each aqueous aminoplast composition can contain up to about 10-20 percent or more of a non-aqueous solvent (or a mixture of two or more non-aqueous solvents) said non-aqueous solvent (or solvents) being soluble in water. Typical examples of non-aqueous solvents excellently adapted for inclusion in our aqueous composi-- tions and agents are methyl alcohol, dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, and the like.

Likewise, because of our disclosure, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that an aqueous solution of a member of a first group" such as the aqueous solution of Embodiment E, supra, can contain up to about 20 percent or more of a non-aqueous solvent (or a mixture of two or more non-aqueous solvents) said non-aqueous solvent (solvents) being soluble in water. Typical examples of non-aqueous solvents excellently adapted for inclusion in an aqueous solution such as that of Embodiment E, supra, include ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide, and the like.

If desired, a cellulosic textile material can be impregnated with an ACA or AAC of our invention, dried, and placed in storage or shipped to a processing plant before being cured. Shelf life is generally at least about 3 months. Fabric which has been impregnated with an ACA or AAC and dried but not cured can be rolled and shipped or stored as a fabric roll.

If desired, a cellulosic textile material can be impregnated with an aqueous system comprising a member of the first group of the above Summary, dried, and placed in storage or shipped before being cured with an aldehyde. Shelf life is about 6 months. Fabric which has been impregnated with said group member and dried but not cured with aldehyde can be formed into a bolt or roll before being shipped or stored.

It is well known to those skilled in the art that where one treats a cellulosic textile material with an ACA or an AAC he applies a quantity of the ACA or AAC sufficient to provide an effective amount (an effective quantity) of the aminoplast component of the ACA or AAC to the cellulosic textile material. Where using an ACA or an AAC of our invention we apply an amount sufficient to provide an effective amount of the aminoplast component of said ACA or AAC.

It is also well known to those skilled in the art that where one treats a cellulosic paper with an aqueous aminoplast paper treating agent or an aqueous aminoplast paper treating composition he applies a quantity of said agent or said composition sufficient to provide an effective amount (an effective quantity) of the aminoplast component (or components) of said agent or said composition to the cellulosic paper. Where using a paper treating agent or a paper treating composition of our invention we apply an amount sufficient to provide an effective amount of the aminoplast component of said agent or composition.

As is well known in the art, where one cures a cellulosic textile material which has been impregnated with an AAC and dried by heating the dried impregnated cellulosic material in the presence of an acid (e.g., gaseous HCI, HBr, S formic acid vapor and the like) he has an effective amount of the acid present.

As is also well known in the art, where one cures a cellulosic paper which has been impregnated with an aqueous aminoplast paper treating composition and dried by heating the dried impregnated paper in the presence of an acid (e.g., gaseous HCl, HBr, S0 formic acid vapor, and the like) he has an effective amount of the acid present.

The instant invention will be better understood by referring to the following specific but nonlimiting examples. It is understood that said invention is not limited by these examples which are offered merely as illustrations; it is also understood that, modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

EXAMPLE I Lactamide was prepared from methyl lactate by the following procedure:

To 1 mole of freshly distilled methyl lactate was added about 2 moles of ammonia. The ammonia was added as an aqueous solution analyzing about 28% NH;,. The resulting mixture was agitated for about 3 hours at about 2030C. Then full vacuum from a water pump (aspiration type filter pump) was applied to the mixture which was heated to about 70C. to remove water and unreacted ammonia. Purity of product was about 9] percent and conversion (one pass yield) was about 97 percent of theory. The same general procedure was used to prepare amides of glycolic acid, B-hydroxypropionic acid, B-methoxypropionic acid, a-methoxypropionic acid, a-normal-butoxypropionic acid, methoxyacetic acid, ethoxyacetic acid, a-iso-propoxypropionic acid, and other organic acids of the type required to form the amides set forth in the above Summary. In each instance a high quality product was obtained in excellent yield.

Methyl a-methoxypropionate (part of which was used to prepare the amide of a-methoxypropionic acid) was prepared by reacting methyl lactate with metallic sodium to form the sodium alkoxide which was converted to methyl a-methoxypropionate by reaction with methyl iodide. Methyl a-normal-butoxypropionate (part of which was used to prepare the amide of a-normal-butoxypropionic acid) was prepared in a similar manner by replacing the methyl iodide with n-butyl iodide. Methyl B-methoxypropionate (part of which was used to prepare the amide of B-methoxypropionic acid) was prepared in a similar manner from B-hydroxypropionate. Methyl ethoxyacetate (part of which was used to prepare the amide of ethoxyacetic acid) was prepared in a similar manner using methyl glycolate and ethyl iodide as starting materials. Methyl a-iso-propoxypropionate (part of which was used to prepare the amide of a-iso-propoxypropionic acid) was prepared in a similar manner from methyl lactate and iso-propyl iodide. Other methyl esters of alkoxy acids were prepared by the same general procedure.

EXAMPLE 2 The general procedure of Example 1 was used to prepare i f (I) 20H;

orrFcH-d-N O H H of excellent quality with excellent conversion by reacting methyl lactate with methylamine.

was prepared by replacing the methylamine with dimethylamine, and

l5 cnaon- N was obtained when the methylamine was replaced with methylethylamine.

OH CH2 CH20H was obtained when the methylamine was replaced with monoethanolamine, and

H CH2CH2OH was obtained when the methylaminc was replaced with diethanolamine. (urn-001111100111.

Table I shows some of the substituted amides which were prepared by the above general method. H

' HTAVBLEVI m. 'A Ester Amine Substituted amide o (oHmNH CH3 amon -mom CHaCH--( 3-N CH3 HIl /HS 0 011301120112 0 CH2CH2CH: cmomr J-oom NH CH2CHz -N Cfia CH: CHa H:

. 0211mm H omomoHiL-oom CHaCHzCH C-N C2Hs 41H: CHa

0 cmwmn 0 )011950113 CHaCHPJ-OCHA \NH CHaCH N CzHs 02m (ilHzCHzCHzCH; CHzCHzCHzCH:

EXAMPLE 3 and AA 1 A Compounds having the general formula 0 i a We-.. *a a..a.. omomcmi'x-o CH3,

0 R1-o- CHr i /A H 5 respectively.

H EXAMPLE 4 where R R .r, and A are as defined in the above Summary. were prepared by the general method of Exam- 40 0 ple 2 except that the methylamine of Example 2 was re- CmCHlLN placed with; piperidine, where A was i 635 6? N/ CHL'i CHr-CHZ was prepared by heating aniline with a large excess of morpholine, where A was and pyrrolidine, where A was lactic acid for about an hour at about 105C. in a flask provided with a fractionating column for removing byproduct water, cooling the resulting reacted mixture and diluting it with a large volume of ice water to precipitate the anilide which was separated by filtration, washed with water, and air dried. An excellent product was obtained with a conversion in excess of about percent of theory where using a mole ratio of lactic acid to aniline of about 1011 and where the anilide was precipitated by pouring the cooled reacted mixture into a large volume ofice water (ca. 15 volumes of ice water per volume of reacted mixture).

The above general procedure was used to prepare anilides of a large number of hydroxy and alkoxy acids including anilides of; a-methoxypropionic acid, a-ethoxypropinic acid, glycolic acid, methoxyglycolic acid, B-methoxypropionic acid, B-iso-propoxypropionic acid, and a-hydroxybutyric acid. In each instance an anilide of excellent quality was obtained in excellent yield.

EXAMPLE The general method of Example 4 was used to prepare O CH: CH PJ-N by replacing the aniline of Example 3 with diphenylamine An excellent product was obtained with a conversion in excess of about 70 percent of theory.

The above general procedure was used to prepare a large number of compounds having the formula Among the compounds prepared were those in which the lactic acid of the above procedure was replaced with the following acids; a-methoxypropionic acid; B-methoxypropionic acid; a-n-butoxypropionic acid;

0 O a ti (CH1); C- (I311- -O H; and (CH CHCH O H.

H CH:

EXAMPLE 6 N-methylollactamide of excellent quality was prepared by the procedure of Einhom (Ann. 1908, 361, l 13) which was referred to supra.

N-methylollactamide of excellent quality was also prepared by the following procedure:

20 Moles of lactamide (1886 g. of lactamide having a purity of about 94.4% was added to 34l0 g. of aqueous formaldehyde solution 37% HCHO) in a stirred reactor at room temperature. The pH of the mixture was adjusted to 7 by adding an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution (20% NaOH); then 25 g. of solid potassium carbonate was added bringing the pH of the resulting mixture to 10. Said resulting mixture was then heated to 60-70C. for 2 hours (with stirring), cooled to about 25C., and its pH was adjusted to 7 with sulfuric acid. The thus prepared mixture was filtered. The resulting filtrate (which was designated Solution No. 6) weighed 5151 grams and had a free HCHQ content of 14.6 percent. A second 20 mole portion of the above-described lactamide was added to Solution No. 6 and the above-described procedure was repeated. in this instance the filtrate (which was designated Solution 6A) weighed 6710 g. and contained 2% free HCHO and about 37 moles of N-methylollactamide.

A large number of other N-mcthylolamides of excellent quality were prepared in good to excellent yields by the general procedure of Einhorn but modified by replacing the lactamide of Einhorn with another amide. Table ll lists some of the N-methylolamides prepared:

TABLE 2 In preparing this compound the Ba(OH)z 0t Einhorn was replaced with NaOH. 0n acidification the Na is replaced with H.

EXAMfiLE 7 The sulfate ester,

preaafatedaaawa seisaraed by filtration and recovered. The filtrate was poured into about ml of dioxane. The bottom oil-like layer contained substantially all of the remaining which was separated by evaporating the dioxane under reduced pressure and at about 7580C.

The above general procedure was used to prepare a number of sulfate substituted amides having the formula where R,, R and x are as defined in the above Summary by replacing the lactonitrile with another nitrile having the formula where R R and x are as above. Among the compounds formed were The compound where R R R R and x are as defined supra (R being -S0 is a sulfate ester of an amide of a hydroxy acid. The above ionic formula of said ester makes it readily apparent to those skilled in the art that: (a) where said sulfate ester is present in an acidic medium, the negative valence shown on the SO;;' moiety is satisfied by a hydrogen; and (b) where the sulfate ester is present in an alkaline or neutral medium, said negative valence is satisfied by a positive ion (or radical) other than hydrogen, e.g., Na*, K, NHf', 1/2

Ca, or the like, (i.e., said sulfate ester is present as a salt).

lt is also readily apparent that such salt can hydrolyze to give acidic or neutral reactions depending on the relative ionization constants of the acid form of said ester,

and the free base (e.g., KOH or NHqOH) which can be derived from the aforesaid positive ion (or radical).

EXAMPLE 8 Four aqueous solutions were prepared; These were:

Solution A: An aqueous dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneurea (DMDHEU) solution having a 45% dissolved solid content. Said solution was prepared by reacting urea with glyoxal and methylolating the resulting product by reacting it with formaldehyde. Solution A had a free formaldehyde content of 7.1 percent.

Solution B: An aqueous N-methylollactamide (NML) solution having a dissolved solid content of 72 percent. It was prepared from lactamide and formaldehyde.

Solution C: An aqueous zinc nitrate solution having a dissolved solid content of 50 percent.

Solution D: An aqueous lactamide solution having a dissolved solid content of percent.

A batch of ordinary ACA (not an improved ACA of our invention) was prepared by admixing an amount of Solution A to provide 30 parts of solid and an amount of Solution C to provide 6 parts of Zn(NO The resulting ACA was designated "Solution 8A."

A batch of improved ACA (an ACA of our invention) was prepared by admixing an amount of solution B to provide 5 parts of solid and one-fourth of the above-described Solution 8A (i.e., to that quantity of Solution 8A which was prepared from an amount of Solution A containing 7.5 parts of solid). The resulting p e AQA, wa sissisn tsii latipaQ1 Another batch of improved ACA (an ACA of our invention fully equivalent to the ACA designated Solution 8B, supra) was prepared by admixing a quantity of Solution A to provide 7.5 parts of solid and an amount of Solution B to provide 5 parts of solid. To the resulting mixture was added an amount of Solution C to provide 1.5 parts of Zn(NO The resulting improved ACA was designated Solution 8C."

A batch of improved AAC (an AAC of our invention) was prepared by admixing an amount of Solution A to provide 30 parts of solid and an amount of Solution B to provide 20 parts of solid. The resulting improved AAC was designated Solution 8D."

Another batch of improved ACA (an ACA of our invention fully equivalent to the ACAs designated Solution 88 and Solution 8C, supra) was prepared by admixing an amount of Solution C to provide 1.5 parts of Zn(NO and one-fourth of the above described Solution 8D (i.e., to that quantity of Solution 8D which was prepared from an amount of Solution A containing 7.5 parts of solid). The resulting improved ACA was designated Solution 8E.

Another batch of improved ACA (an ACA of our invention fully equivalent to the ACAs designated 8B, 8C, and 8D, supra) was prepared by adding a quantity of Solution D to provide 6 parts of lactamide to onefourth of the above described Solution 8A. The resulting improved ACA was designated Solution 8F.

37 38 The general procedure used to prepare Solution 8F, Each of the cured samples of cellulosic broadcloth described supra, was repeated but in this instance said was numbered with a number corresponding to the Run procedure was modified by replacing the Solution D Number in which it was prepared. Thus, the sample with 4.6 parts of water and 10.7 parts of from Run No. 98 became Sample 98", that from Run No. 9C becameSample 9C, etc.

cmoH -NH:.

SlOaH Samples 9A and 98 were submitted to the tests listed in the following tables, and the results of these tests The resulting solution was designated Solution 8C. 10 were as stated in said tables.

.H a. W. WWW. .s. s a

Tear Strength Chlorine Damage S washings (Elmcndorf) Flex Durable Press (Tensile) Sample Abrasion. Ratings. after Chlorinated Loss of No. Warp Fill Warp 5 washings Chlorinated and Scorched Tensile,

9A 272 160 55 3.8 29 29 0 9B 368 208 I27 3 44 7 90 TABIIE 5 Wrinkle Recovery Tensile Wrinkle Recovery After Washing 1 Inch Ravel Elongation Toughness Before Washing 5 Times Warp Retention Fill Warp Fill Warp Fill Sample No. Dry Wet Dry Wet of tensile strength of the untreated fabric retained after treatment EXAMPLE 9 Results substantiallyindistinguishable from those as Run No 9A: A Sample (ca 76 Cm by 38 cm) of tamed with Sample 9B wereobtamed for Samples 9C, 410W broadcloth combed lawn (a cellulosic broad- 40 when Sam Samples were Submmed cloth) was padded (ca. 81 percent wet pickup) with Soto the tests hsted m Tables 4 and lution 8A, described supra, after adjusting the dissolved EXAMPLE 1 1 solid content of said Solution 8 A to 9 percent (by dilution with water). The padded sample was placed in a frame to maintain its size and shape, dried for 5 minutes at 93C., and then cured for 5 minutes at 163C.

Run No. 11A: Several yards of cellulosic corduroy cloth was padded with Solution 11A an aqueous dimethyloldihydroxyethylene urea solution adjusted to The cured sample was labeled Sample contain about 1 8% dimethyloldihydroxyethylene urea Five additional runs were made using the general as dissolved solids, about 1% zmc nitrate, about 3.0%

procedure described above but modified in each inof a -1 1 p yethylene emulsion, and about O 1% stance by replacing Solution 8A with the respective soof a non'lomc wetting 3861113150 on a Sohds lution indicated in the following table, the dissolved lution 11A is a Convemlonal ACA not p solid content of each solution being adjusted to the ACA of our inventiolh) concentration indicated by dilution with water before The Corduroy which had taken P about P padding the cloth sample with the solution, cent of its weight of the padding solution was dried at 93C. for 5 minutes. The thus dried corduroy was cut, pressed and cured (to simulate the fabrication of a gar- TABLE 3 ment from this material wherein it would be cut, sewed,

pressed and cured). Pressing was carried out on a hot Run No 50mm, iflifl fifig head press with a head temperature of 175C. lt was steamed for 30 seconds, vacuumed for 30 seconds 3g :2 5:; without the head and with the blower turned off, and 9D 8D 13.9 baked at about 175C. for 15 seconds under pressure. WEN '7 gFmmmwA-T "alto-m W V It was then cured at 160C. for 5 minutes in an air cir- 3f BIS culating electric oven. A representative sample of the cellulosic corduroy cloth which had been treated ac- In this instance the general procedure of Run 9A was further modified hy cording to the procedure of Run N designated conducting the curing step (5 minutes at 163C.) in an atmosphere of sulfur dioxide. Sample 1 1A.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5459301 *Jan 19, 1994Oct 17, 1995Miller; Alan E.Cyclic microwave treatment of pressed garments
US5520869 *Oct 14, 1994May 28, 1996Courtaulds PlcTreatment of fibre
US5562739 *May 19, 1995Oct 8, 1996Courtaulds Fibres (Holdings) LimitedLyocell fiber treatment method
US5580356 *Mar 9, 1994Dec 3, 1996Courtaulds Fibres (Holdings) LimitedFibre treatment method
US5759210 *May 1, 1995Jun 2, 1998Courtaulds Fibres (Holdings) LimitedLyocell fabric treatment to reduce fibrillation tendency
US5779737 *Apr 12, 1995Jul 14, 1998Courtaulds Fibres Holdings LimitedFibre treatment
US5882356 *Jul 7, 1997Mar 16, 1999Courtaulds Fibres (Holdings) LimitedFibre treatment
US20090044347 *Sep 21, 2006Feb 19, 2009Clariant International LtdProcess for Finishing Textiles
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Classifications
U.S. Classification427/375, 427/393.2, 8/185, 8/184
International ClassificationD06M15/423, D21H17/51, C08K5/20, C08K5/16, C08L61/00, C08L61/20
Cooperative ClassificationD21H17/51, C08K5/16, D06M15/423, C08K5/20
European ClassificationC08K5/20, C08K5/16, D06M15/423, D21H17/51
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 5, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: W.R. GRACE & CO.-CONN.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:W.R. GRACE & CO., A CORP. OF CONN. (MERGED INTO);GRACE MERGER CORP., A CORP. OF CONN. (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004937/0001
Effective date: 19880525