Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3849223 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1974
Filing dateFeb 26, 1973
Priority dateFeb 26, 1973
Publication numberUS 3849223 A, US 3849223A, US-A-3849223, US3849223 A, US3849223A
InventorsKent R
Original AssigneeArmstrong Cork Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making a non-woven needled fabric having a random linear streaked design
US 3849223 A
Abstract
A random linear streaked design is achieved in a non-woven needled fabric structure particularly adapted for carpets by: laying up a web comprised of dyed staple fiber bundles, individual bundles being of one of a plurality of colors, by opening the bundles and blending the bundles forming the web to a controlled degree such that individual bundles in the web retain their distinct coloration; garnetting the web to orient the fibers at a speed whereby further blending is minimized; cross-lapping said web onto a preformed backing web positioned on a stationary apron to form a plurality of layers in which the garnetted fibers are substantially parallel to cross-machine direction; and transporting said backing web and overlying layers to a needling operation and needling the web and overlying layers to form an integral, unitary, needled fabric in which the slightly opened commingled fibers form colorful streaks having a random linear design comprised of the plurality of colors forming the original staple fiber bundles.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Nov. 19, 1974 METHOD OF MAKING A NON-WOVEN NEEDLED FABRIC HAVING A RANDOM LINEAR STREAKED DESIGN [75] Inventor: Raymond C. Kent, Lancaster, Pa.

[73] Assignee: Armstrong Cork Company,

Lancaster, Pa.

[22] Filed: Feb. 26, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 335,923

156/180, 156/181, 28/722 R [51] Int. Cl B321) 23/02 [58] Field of Search 156/72, 148, 62.2, 62.4,

156/63,166,176,l78,l80,181, 91, 93; 28/4, 72.2 R, 72 NW; 112/401, 410, 415, 429; 161/50, 55, 60, 61, 62, 67, 80, 81

Lochner.- 156/148 Primary Examiner-Charles E. Van Horn Assistant ExaminerF. Frisenda, Jr.

[5 7] ABSTRACT A random linear streaked design is achieved in a nonwoven needled fabric structure particularly adapted for carpets by: laying up a web comprised of dyed staple fiber bundles, individual bundles being of one of a plurality of colors, by opening the bundles and blending the bundles forming the web to a controlled degree such that individual bundles in the web retain their distinct coloration; garnetting the web to orient the fibers at a speed whereby further blending is minimized; cross-lapping said web onto a preformed backing web positioned on a stationary apron to form a plurality of layers in which the garnetted fibers are substantially parallel to cross-machine direction; and transporting said backing web and overlying layers to a needling operation andneedling the web and overlying layers to form an integral, unitary, needled fabric in which the slightly opened commingled fibers form colorful streaks having a random linear design comprised of the plurality of colors forming the original staple fiber bundles.

6 Claims, 1 Drawing-Figure METHOD OF MAKING A NON-WOVEN NEEDLED FABRIC HAVING A RANDOM LINEAR STREAKED DESIGN BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION unidirectional, oriented, filamentary material and states that by using differently colored filamentary materials or specially prepared or textured filamentary materials a very great variety of patterned and textured non-woven fabrics can be produced.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a method of manufacturing a non-woven, needled fabric having a random linear pattern and, more particularly, a non-woven, needled carpet structure adapted for acoustical applications to wall surfaces. In the method of this'invention, staple fiber bundles of a plurality of colors are opened and blended to a controlled degree such that each of the bundles retains its distinct coloration while blending to form a web of a plurality of such colors. This web is then garnetted to orient the fibers but at a speed whereby further color blending is minimized. The garnetted web is then cross-lapped onto a backing web positioned on a stationary apron thus forming a plurality of layers in which the fibers are oriented parallel to cross-machine direction. The plurality of layers and backing web are then transported to a needling operation and the layers needled to the backing web to form an integral, unitary, needled fabric or carpet structure in which the slightly opened, commingled fibers at the surface form colorful streaks creating a random linear pattern of the plurality of colors of the original staple fiber bundles. At the needling operation a scrim may be interposed between the decorative surface layers and backing web prior to needling or the decorative surface layers and backing web may be integrated with a backing scrim which is placed beneath the backing web just prior to the needling operation to provide a dimensionally stable carpet structure.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The FIGURE of the drawing is a diagrammatic perspective view of the apparatus and process steps used in carrying out the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Stock dyed fibers (about 2 inches to 4 inches staple) having deniers of from approximately 3 to about 8 are I initially formed into opened bundles of a single color,

the size of the bundle determining the width and length of the particular colored streak in the final carpet structure. As shown in the drawing, opened bundles of ciently built up to completely hide the backing web.

This usually requires about six to 10 layers of lapped web. Since the apron is stationary, the cross-lapper feeds the web in a single direction parallel to the crossmachine direction of the fabric. Direction of crosslapped web travel is indicated by arrows.

When sufficient layers of the web have been crosslapped onto the backing web, the structure is transported the width of the cross-lapper and additional garnetted layers are cross-lapped onto the newly exposed backing web 5. The intermittent operations are continued with the backing web 5 and the overlying decorative layers 7 being fed as indicated by arrow 8 to a conventional needling operation 9 (needle loom) where the several layers and backing webare needled to form a unitary, non-woven, needled structure having a variable linear pattern in which the colors of the individual fiber bundles randomly repeat, giving a natural overall linear streaked effect to the surface or facing layer of the finished product.

Colored staple organic fibers such as fibers formed of poly (vinyl chloride), rayon, nylon, acrylics and wool may be readily utilized in the practice of this invention. It is generally preferred to utilize fire-resistant fibers in forming the streaked wear layer, particularly such fibers as the modacrylics, such as Eastman Kodaks Verel and Union Carbides Dynel, so as to form a final carpet structure having a fire-resistant facing layer.

In order to form a more dimensionally stable carpet structure, it is preferable to either interpose a scrim 10 between the backing web 5 and the several layers 7 which form the surfacing web prior to the first needling operation or to position a scrim beneath the originally needled structure and, at a second needling station, to needle the fabric to the dimensionally stable scrim. Conventional methods may be utilized to apply the conventional latex backings to the needled, nonwoven, carpet structure after theneedling operations.

' EXAMPLE From stock dyed staple modacrylic fibers (Eastman Verel) supplied in a variety of colors, clumps of orange, yellow and red were opened up and formed into bundles having diameters ranging from about 2 to 6 inches. The individual staple fibers forming the bundles were approximately 3 inches in length and of 8 denier. Individual bundles of each of the three colors were blended" lapper and cross-lapped onto an apron carrying a preformed three ounce backing web formed of the same staple fibers which have previously been thoroughly blended together. The apron is moved intermittently during the fabric forming operation, remaining stationary while sufficient layers of web from the garnett are cross-lapped so as to form a facing layer completely hiding the backing web; in this instance eight layers are cross-lapped to form a three ounce facing layer in which the three colors are maintained as individual streaks running generally parallel to cross-machine direction, the dominant background color being formed from the orange bundles.

Upon formation of the necessary layers, the crosslapper is stopped and the apron moved the width of the cross-lapper to expose the backing web and the operations repeated.

The backing web carrying the decorative streaked facing layer is then transported to a needle loom where the non-woven fabric is needled forming an integral, needled fabric in which the slightly open, commingled fibers in the facing layer form a random linear streaked pattern of the three colors.

A dimensionally stable glass fiber scrim is then positioned beneath the needled fabric and united thereto at a second needle loom. A conventional latex backing is applied and cured, forming a decorative streaked carpet structure having a fire-retardant surface. The carpet structure is particularly adaptable for use as a decorative wall surfacing material for acoustic applications.

What is claimed is:

l. A method of manufacturing a non-woven needled fabric having a random linear streaked design of a plurality of colors comprising:

a. forming a fibrous layer by opening and blending dyed staple organic fiber bundles to a controlled degree such that each of the bundles retains its distinct coloration, the individual bundles being of one of a plurality of colors;

b. garnetting said layer into a web whereby the fibers are oriented but at a speed whereby further fiber blending is minimized;

c. cross-lapping said web onto a backing web positioned on a stationary apron to build up sufficient layers to hide the backing;

d. transporting said backing web and plurality of surfacing layers to a needling station and needling the web and overlying layers to form an integral, unitary, needled fabric in which the commingled fibers form colorful streaks having a random linear pattern of the plurality of colors of the staple fiber bundles.

2. The method in accordance with claim 1 wherein the denier of the staple fibers is from about 3 to 8 and wherein the lengths of said fibers are from about 2 to 4 inches.

3. The method in accordance with claim 2 wherein the fibers are of a fire-retardant modacrylic composition.

4. The method in accordance with claim 2 wherein a dimensionally stable scrim is positioned over the backing web.

5. The method in accordance with claim 2 wherein a dimensionally stable scrim is united to the back of the needled fabric at a second needling station and a latex backing is thereafter secured to form a decorative streaked carpet structure.

6. The method in accordance with claim 3 wherein a dimensionally stable scrim is united to the back of the needled fabric at a second needling station and a latex backing thereafter applied to forma decorative carpet structure having a flame-retardant random linear streaked surface.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2158533 *Feb 2, 1938May 16, 1939Carthage Mills IncMeans and method for the manufacture of decorative needled fabrics
US3250655 *Aug 28, 1961May 10, 1966Adler SolomonMethod for producing non-woven fabric
US3523059 *Aug 23, 1967Aug 4, 1970Celanese CorpNeedled fibrous batting and method of making the same
US3615989 *May 9, 1967Oct 26, 1971Stevens & Co Inc J PNonwoven fabric structure
US3649400 *Mar 14, 1969Mar 14, 1972Prefecture AitiMethod of manufacturing nonwoven fabric with pattern formed thereon
US3705064 *Jan 14, 1970Dec 5, 1972Cik Chemische Ind Kempen GmbhProcess for the manufacture of varicolored,ornamentally designed needled non-woven fabrics
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4042655 *Sep 5, 1975Aug 16, 1977Phillips Petroleum CompanyMethod for the production of a nonwoven fabric
US4105381 *Jun 6, 1977Aug 8, 1978Phillips Petroleum CompanyApparatus for the production of a nonwoven fabric
US4197343 *Aug 2, 1978Apr 8, 1980Foss Manufacturing Co., Inc.Needle-punched laminate
US4631789 *Nov 10, 1983Dec 30, 1986Oskar Dilo Maschinenfabrik KgApparatus for the production of needled, shaped fibrous bodies
US4828914 *Dec 14, 1987May 9, 1989Armstrong World Industries, Inc.Non-woven flannel fabric
US4878278 *Apr 29, 1988Nov 7, 1989Wangner Systems CorporationMethod for manufacture of paper making fabrics
US4916782 *Jan 27, 1989Apr 17, 1990Armstrong World Industries, Inc.Method for making a non-woven flannel fabric
US6060145 *Jul 22, 1997May 9, 2000Synthetic Industries, Inc.Modified secondary backing fabric, method for the manufacture thereof and carpet containing the same
US6344254Jun 25, 1998Feb 5, 2002Sind, LlcModified secondary backing fabric, method for the manufacture thereof and carpet containing the same
US6735835 *Aug 3, 2001May 18, 2004Kong Foo WongMethod and apparatus for manufacturing non-woven fabrics
US6859983 *Sep 18, 2002Mar 1, 2005Polymer Group, Inc.Camouflage material
US7346967 *Oct 4, 2004Mar 25, 2008Horustec GmbhProcess for producing a floor covering
US20020124367 *Aug 3, 2001Sep 12, 2002Wong Kong FooMethod and apparatus for manufacturing non-woven fabrics
US20030092341 *Sep 18, 2002May 15, 2003Polymer Group, Inc.Camouflage material
US20050042378 *Oct 4, 2004Feb 24, 2005Falke Garne KgProcess for producing a floor covering
US20050287334 *Jun 29, 2004Dec 29, 2005Wright Jeffery JCushioned flooring products
CN101671919BSep 9, 2008Jan 26, 2011仪征市四方轻纺机械厂Cross lapping machine
EP1365061A2 *May 21, 2003Nov 26, 2003DWS Teppichwerke GmbHCarpet and method and apparatus for making the same
WO1989010258A1 *Apr 28, 1989Nov 2, 1989Barry M FellReinforced thermoplastic honeycomb structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/148, 156/166, 156/180, 28/111, 156/181, 156/176, 28/112, 28/109
International ClassificationD04H11/04, D04H1/46, D04H11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04H1/46, D04H11/04
European ClassificationD04H1/46, D04H11/04